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When Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed the Illinois Way Forward Act into law in August, he put the state squarely on the side of a growing movement against the federal government’s vast immigration detention system. The law banned cities and counties statewide from renting out beds in their jails to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and it required counties that already had ICE detention contracts to end them by Jan. 1.

When Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed the Illinois Way Forward Act into law in August, he put the state squarely on the side of a growing movement against the federal government’s vast immigration detention system. The law banned cities and counties statewide from renting out beds in their jails to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and it required counties that already had ICE detention contracts to end them by Jan. 1.

When Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed the Illinois Way Forward Act into law in August, he put the state squarely on the side of a growing movement against the federal government’s vast immigration detention system. The law banned cities and counties statewide from renting out beds in their jails to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and it required counties that already had ICE detention contracts to end them by Jan. 1.

When Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed the Illinois Way Forward Act into law in August, he put the state squarely on the side of a growing movement against the federal government’s vast immigration detention system. The law banned cities and counties statewide from renting out beds in their jails to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and it required counties that already had ICE detention contracts to end them by Jan. 1.

When Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed the Illinois Way Forward Act into law in August, he put the state squarely on the side of a growing movement against the federal government’s vast immigration detention system. The law banned cities and counties statewide from renting out beds in their jails to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and it required counties that already had ICE detention contracts to end them by Jan. 1.