DEAR EDITOR:

My morning ritual is a smoothie. Two scoops of Organic Vanilla Gluten Free protein powder added to eight ounces of water. This is followed by a cup of spinach, frozen organic berries, yogurt, cinnamon and a little turmeric. I reached for the protein powder and the whole jar fell to the floor. Even though no one was in the kitchen I yelled, “Brooks, ... boy! What a knucklehead.” My son, in a rush to go for a jog, forgot to tighten the lid on my protein powder.

Suddenly, I felt a rush of emotion. I am really complaining about spilled protein powder when Ahmaud Arbery’s mom is grieving the murder of her son? Spilled protein powder versus spilled blood. Brooks is 25 years old. The same age as Ahmaud was when he was stalked and gunned down by two white men in February. He and Ahmaud have the same complexion, a rich dark chocolate. Brooks and Ahmaud have that million-dollar smile. Based on the sickening video, Ahmaud was athletic and enjoyed working out and staying in shape. Brooks is solid as a concrete wall from years of wrestling on the college level. He finished his last college assignment this week. His diploma from a college in south Georgia is expected in the coming weeks. He plans to teach history beginning this fall. During an interview with CNN, Ahmaud’s sister said her brother wanted to be an electrician. She described him as a gentle soul who loved jogging.

Since his teenage years, I have educated my son about how to interact with the police. If stopped while driving do this: Call mom. Put me on video. Put your hands and your license on the dashboard. If it’s night, turn on your interior light. Answer the question. Stay calm. You’ll be fine.” In America, black and brown males should be allowed to drive and jog without the threat of being killed or harassed.

Every time my son leaves, I ask the blood of Jesus to cover him. I ask God to assign powerful angels to protect and cover him. The killing of Ahmaud really, really hurts. It feels so personal. Ahmaud is all of our son. If you believe in truth, if you believe in justice, if you profess to love humanity — your heart should be broken!

DeLain R. Climmons

Powder Springs


DEAR EDITOR:

Having moved to Cobb County five years ago to be with our grandchildren, I have seen the fear that many of my black neighbors have of the police and just white folks. Something that is hard for me to understand, as a U. S. Marshal and N.Y.S. Police, never once did I have to fight a black person to put the handcuffs on. I was always trusted, every police officer I have met in Cobb, has been outstanding, nothing to fear, but that fear is there.

They talk about the old days with real fear, what happened to Mr. Arbery now, has reinforced that fear. Knowing that I’m a member of the Union Sons, my family fought with the Irish Brigade, they talk about the Confederate flag and what it stand for them, hate. I meet many Confederate Sons and never once, did one ever bring race into a conversation, its about family heritage.

I see a Georgia State Battlefield Park, like Pickett’s Mill. The State of Georgia will tell you, that it was a one-day battle and the Confederates won. The official investigation of the war in 1891, the reports of both Confederate and Union officers will tell you, that it was a full 10 days of skirmishing in the current park. Gen. Johnston’s line was broken and the Confederates retreated to Lost Mountain. Why is the state of Georgia still re-enforcing black fear?

Its been 156 years since the Battle for Atlanta, and I still see fear in my well-educated black neighbors. I just don’t understand why this is happening, in 2020?

Steve Reilly

Lost Mountain


DEAR EDITOR:

This past week has shown that city, county, state, and the federal governments have learned nothing from past events. The protests in Columbia Virginia should have shown what can happen with the type of protests around the country when there is little pre-preparation. There are groups of people around our country that look for and thrive on these types of civil unrest protests. They come to areas looking to cause unrest and trouble. The authorities in these areas should be prepared to look for these peoples that come from out of the area and especially from out of state.

The federal government has the ability to track some of these groups. The local authorities can do things to track incoming groups. These people use social media and have to have places to stay while here. The hotels and motels could be used to help identify out of starters and let the authorities know of an influx of these people. The police could have undercover officers mix in with the protesters to try and spot the trouble makers. The organizers also should let the police if they stop the same types of people. Small groups of officers should be placed in areas where vandalism might take place and can be rapidly be deployed.

These are but a few things that could be done in advance to help insure that the protesters, residents, and businesses can feel safe. Just saying.

Larry Bost

Marietta


DEAR EDITOR:

Let us all try to give our young people and the rest us some hope. I was dismayed how little coverage was given to the SpaceX launch and the faultless rendezvous of our USA astronauts with the Space Station. This uplifting news was related to miniscule articles buried in both the MDJ and AJC. It was the same on TV. All news was of the rioting, looting and protests. While I understand and sympathize with the anger, I wish it could be directed in a positive and productive way.

I grew up in the fifties during the Cold War and the Space Race. In schools we had drills where we hid under the desks, not to prepare for tornadoes, but to prepare for an atom bomb attack. We were fearful, but hopeful that we were going to be OK.

At all space launches, every TV in the school was on with all students eyes focused and we were in awe as we watched the rockets head to the sky.

Russia was ahead with Sputnik and the first man and women in space, but the USA rose to the occasion and sent Neil Armstrong to land on the moon.

It was inspiring and gave us hope for the future.

I am trying to be positive and hopeful that we can find a way together to give our young people and all of us the inspiration to rise above this calamity now facing our country.

Way to go, USA.

Linda Worley

Marietta


DEAR EDITOR:

I have a few opinions about the guidelines for re-opening schools as shared by my superintendent, Dr. Rivera and the CDC. To reopen schools, they have to have:

♦ Strategic placement of school desks to increase social distancing in classrooms.

♦ One-way walk patterns in hallways.

♦ Increased hand sanitizer bottles/stations in classrooms and hallways.

♦ Masks may be worn by students and staff.

♦ Limiting large groups of students in areas such as cafeterias, gyms, etc.

♦ Students eating in classrooms or outside, rather than in the cafeteria.

How is this going to work? I’m not criticizing or anything, but our school isn’t big enough for social distancing of desks and students. How are we going to get enough sanitizer for our school if all schools throughout Georgia are doing the same thing? If we aren’t able to eat in the cafeteria or with friends, how are we going to talk to them other than yelling across the room, “Hey (I’m making up a name) Jeremy, how was summer break!?” I mean only time will tell, but have you heard the zen saying, leap and the net will appear? If we leap, by letting everyone go back to school and work, then the net will appear and we could be totally fine or we could start a new wave of sicknesses.

In closing, I’m all in for going back to school to see my friends again, but I don’t understand how this is going to work, our school isn’t big enough to stay 6 feet apart, will I get suspended if I’m only like 4 feet apart from my friend?

Jackson Micheletto

a 12-year-old Rising MMS, troop 287

Marietta


DEAR EDITOR:

My friends and I were excited about the Georgia Grown Food event on Al Bishop Road. Here was a chance to get locally grown food therefore helping Georgia farmers and helping someone else with a food donation. I was the lucky one. After wending through Powder Springs traffic, a daunting task on any day, I reached the pickup site after only an hour. Some friends sat in traffic for two hours. Once I reached the pickup site, the event ran rather smoothly, taking only 10 minutes to go through. It was when I arrived home that I became confused.

I had purchased an extra flat of blueberries so that I could freeze and have “Georgia Grown” blueberries all year long because I like to buy local produce if possible. Imagine my surprise when I saw that my blueberries, clearly marked Georgia Grown, came from Traverse City, MI. I know GA grows blueberries because I have bought some. The vegetables were beautiful, but now I doubt whether they actually came from Georgia. Checking my bank statement, I saw that the event was handled by JRM Management, an event planner from Kennesaw. For some reason, I thought that this was an event run by volunteers.

I am sure there must have been some fine print somewhere that I neglected to read that would have answered my questions. I only hope that someone in need actually got a free box for which I paid $40

Pamela Keenliside

Marietta


DEAR EDITOR:

I’ve been wondering what one voice could do in the COVID environment and I think I’ve got it. I cleaned out my closet yesterday looking for articles of clothing Made in _ _ _ _ _. I found more than I expected. A few items had been recently purchased for spring and summer. Today I took them back to UPS to return for my money back. Others will not go back in the closet. Regardless of politics, I decided I just no longer want to patronize businesses in certain countries. My closet is cleaner, my conscience is clearer. From now on, I’ll buy Made in the USA.

Judy Beard

Marietta


DEAR EDITOR:

This class is not the first to miss its graduation ceremonies. I know of one soldier was ready to parachute into Normandy on D-Day when he realized his high school class was graduating that night. My dad did not attend his college graduation ceremony, as he left for the Navy. He was the first in our family to graduate from college. His dad was a coal miner. Dad and Mom were tainted by the Depression, just as today’s graduates will be defined as the 2020 class who spent the last few months at home. There are worse things, like World War II.

“The Economist” Magazine quoted Raj Chetty, Harvard Economist, “The chance that a child will go on to earn more than their parents, has dropped from 90% to 50%.” I question that. My kids are millennials and all have graduate degrees. I don’t.

Kennesaw State University President Pam Whitten spoke to The Marietta Rotary Club recently. “KSU has 38,000 students including many from Cobb County.” As former President Obama said, graduates need to find a way to serve their communities. I believe it may not be in your field of study. My dad was trained as a teacher, but became a salesman. He said, “There will always be a job for a salesman.” The KSU Coles College of Business is named after Michael Coles, a cookie salesman! It has been my experience, there is no nepotism in Atlanta. Your grandfather does not need to be buried next to my grandfather for us to do business. If you think big, add value, and provide a service, you will have a rich rewarding life. Every time there is change, there is opportunity, like right now.

Daniel F. Kirk

Kennesaw


DEAR EDITOR:

Instead of big companies laying off the “little people” during the virus pandemic I think the better idea would be to let the “big wigs” go first. That would save far more money and allow the more productive workers to maintain their homes, etc.

After all the big wigs are making the biggest salaries and doing less of the hard work.

J. A. Smith-Painter

Marietta


DEAR EDITOR:

I am presenting an idea re the state of the economy in Georgia. I reside in Cobb County and have another home in Pennsylvania. As a result we pay the full school tax on the value of our Kennesaw house. It is a wonderful law that allows senior citizens in Cobb County to not pay this tax on their private homes.

My suggestion is for those senior homeowners who can afford it, pay a one time charity offering to the schools of Cobb County and Marietta to HELP the districts maintain the education system in the time of COVID-19. Totally voluntary, one time donation, for the wonderful teachers and children.

Peggy Filipovits

Kennesaw


DEAR EDITOR:

The editorial written by Mr. Gary Bottoms on Thursday, May 21 was excellent. His simple arguments for the financial grant of $1 million by the Cobb County Board of Commissioners to help provide food assistance to those in need was right on the mark. I join him in thanking Chairman Boyce and Commissioners Birrell, Cupid and Ott for their vote. This assistance is much needed by many in our community.

It is too bad that Commissioner Keli Gambrill chose to vote no. She apparently does not want to help the many constituents in District 1 that need help in this unprecedented time. This the only negative vote in approving the grant will come back to haunt her in her next election cycle.

James Daniel

Marietta


DEAR EDITOR:


DEAR EDITOR:

I read the article of 5/20 regarding Wellstar. I want to give them some business. My wife was scheduled for a total hip replacement in mid-April. Of course, it was canceled. Now outpatient surgery has reopened but due to her having complications that require an overnight stay she cannot be scheduled. Her doctor says that is a Wellstar rule.

Kennestone says that as long as there are COVID-19 patients in the hospital the surgery can only be done if the doctor advocates and presents the case to the board. Meanwhile, she is in great pain and no one can tell me when she might have some relief.

Can anyone out there tell me a pathway for relief?

Randall Brand Sr.

Acworth


It has been wonderful that our medical care workers and heroes have been saluted by flyovers by the Blue Angels, the Thunderbirds and C-130s from Dobbins AFB. They deserve this and so much more.

I suggest that our Sen. Kelly Loeffler lead a flyover to honor them in her private jet that her husband bought her to commute to work and campaign. She could lead other private jets from her corporate pals.

James Daniel

Marietta

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