This week’s Time Capsule looks at World War I honors, Prohibition events and attempted arson.

100 years ago …

The Thursday, Oct. 9, 1919, edition of The Cobb County Times reported that the Kennesaw Lodge, No. 32, F. & A.M., honored the Friday before members of the lodge that served in WWI.

Nearly 200 members of the Masons from all parts of the county gathered in the lodge’s rooms. After the assembly, they marched in body to the hall over the Dixie Theater where they were served barbecue.

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Marietta native William D. Anderson was reported as having been elected president of the Bibb Manufacturing Co., one of the largest textile mills in Georgia.

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At the regular annual meeting of the Marietta Golf Club, held at the clubhouse the Monday before, W.A. DuPre was re-elected president without opposition. T.A. Gramling was named vice-president, W.C. Carricker was once again elected secretary and D.R. Little was elected treasurer.

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The Friday, Oct. 10, 1919, edition of The Marietta Journal ran on the front page an announcement calling all WWI Army, Navy and Marine Corps veterans to the Marietta courthouse on Oct. 11, 1919, for the purpose of organizing Blackjack Post No. 29 of the American Legion.

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Charlie Hunter, Acworth’s town marshal, was reported as having a narrow escape from death. Hunter had charged and arrested a young man for larceny earlier in the week.

The marshal and the prisoner went to Dallas, where the man claimed that he could make bond. At the designated place, the prisoner managed to secure a shotgun and a pistol, then fired on Hunter twice at close range. Hunter knocked the gun aside to escape harm, but the prisoner was also able to escape.

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In the “Current Events” column, the editors carried a story about how Revenue officers, enforcing the Prohibition laws, discovered that “tomatoes and washing powders were used in the manufacture of moonshine whiskey” on a raid in Lick Creek, West Virginia. Those who had drank “the concoction” were reported as having been ill for two or three weeks.

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On the Editorial Page, the editors wrote the following items:

♦ “A fine new hotel and a big cotton factory would not be better located anywhere in the South than in Marietta. Why can we not have both?”

♦ “Soon the census enumerations will be at work and every community owes it to itself to see that the census is fully and properly taken.”

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An advertisement for Rogers, a grocery store with locations at 101 Church Street and 104 Cherokee Street, both in Marietta, listed the following sale items — fresh cranberries for 15-cents per quart; six pounds of whole wheat flour for 56-cents, bunches of celery for nine-cents and cabbage at five-cents a pound.

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In the “News From Our Correspondents” column, the Kennesaw section correspondent wrote the following items:

♦ “Mr. and Mrs. Burt Huggins have moved to Cartersville and we commend Judge Newt A. Morris on the stand he took in ordering this Huggins woman to move out of the Blue Ridge Circuit. She was convicted of selling whiskey (in Kennesaw in) the last court term.”

♦ “Revenue officer McKinney and Sheriff W.E. Swanson made a raid two miles north of (Kennesaw) on the Dixie Highway (the week before) getting some whiskey and malt. No arrests were made.”

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Oct. 5, 1969, edition of The Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that Norton Park Elementary School, already heavily damaged by arson, fell victim to an attempted arson the Thursday before. A molotov cocktail was reported as being thrown through a classroom window and kerosene was also poured in the hall, but both failed to ignite.

The firebug was also reported as having burned a hole in the side of the transmitter station for WKLS on Barnes Mill Road. The frame three-room building was damaged by a “flambo,” which was “a smudgepot used in road construction work.”

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator and Historian for the Marietta Daily Journal.

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