This week’s Time Capsule looks at a Confederate veteran monument, a land auction, an escaped convict and a gambling house.

100 years ago …

The Thursday, Nov. 6, 1919, edition of The Cobb County Times reported the Friday night before, the Blackjack Post No. 29 of the American Legion was “temporarily organized” by 40-50 men with the following officers: Ed Groves, commander; Arthur C. Crowe, adjutant; A.D. Little, treasurer; and Dr. L.L. Blair, chaplain. The article said that because so many former service men were scattered about Cobb County, there weren’t enough men present to attempt a “permanent organization.”

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The Rotary Club of Marietta was reported as holding its first meeting the Wednesday before at the Kennesaw Hotel, attended by its full membership.

Rotarian M.L. McNeel spoke on the “deplorable service now being given patrons of the trolley line between Marietta and Atlanta.” Following the speech, the Club voted to have its public affairs committee take up the matter with officials of the company.

On the editorial page, the Times editors also ran the following statement: “Marietta — the smallest city in the United States to share in the Equitable Home Purchase Plan — and Marietta, the smallest city in the United States to have a Rotary Club.”

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The Friday, Nov. 7, 1919, edition of The Marietta Journal reported on the front page that J.A. Massey broke his thigh bone the Saturday before in Marietta after slipping on a banana peel on a sidewalk in Marietta.

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A resolution was passed the Saturday before at the monthly meeting of the Marietta Camp No. 763 of Confederate Veterans that asked Cobb County’s residents to erect a monument to the memory of the men who died in service during the Civil War. J. Gid Morris was quoted as saying that he would donate the land for the site on the Dixie Highway and “contribute to the cause as much as anyone else did.”

The article also reported Judge J.M. Gann, the ordinary of the county, had been trying to get the names and enlistment records of every man from Cobb that entered the service.

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A.P. Talley, the manager of The Strand Theater in Marietta, was reported as leaving at the end of the week to go “elsewhere in the service of the S.A. Lynch Enterprises, owners of the Strand.” Talley was to be succeeded by B.R. Linton.

S.A. Lynch Enterprises was also reported as having made “a big deal” that week and acquired the chain of Wells picture theaters in Atlanta, Savannah, Knoxville and Augusta. The deal added five theaters in Atlanta alone to the company.

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Olive Faw’s school, which had been called the “Little School on the Corner” in Marietta, was reported as opening for the year with a number of pupils from out of town. Among them was Robert Gregg McCulloch of Anaconda, Montana, which was 3,000 miles away.

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A full page ad on Page 11 announced that the Carolina Land Auction Company of Columbia, South Carolina, and the Holland Realty Company of Marietta were to have two auctions, which would be “the biggest auction sale ever held in Cobb County.”

The first was to be on Nov. 19, 1919, for 190 building lots in Marietta along with four residences, which were within a block of the streetcar line.

The second was to be on Nov. 20, 1919, for the 380-acre farm, formerly owned by the late Judge P. Bowie, that was three miles west of Smyrna and had been cut into several smaller farms.

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On the Editorial Page, the editors wrote the following:

♦ “The fact that over 100 divorces were granted in the Savannah courts last week would indicate that it is not everyone who knows what they want until they get it.”

♦ “Two of the midway show operators at the Southeastern Fair died from drinking wood-alcohol while a third got 12 months for forgery, which shows the average midway morality.”

50 years ago …

In the Thursday, Nov. 6, 1969, paper it was reported that nine people were arrested and $17,000 in gambling money was confiscated in a raid on a gambling house near Acworth. Officers said the operation was linked with interstate crime activities as well as other gambling operations in metro Atlanta. One officer described the house as a major gambling center, with cards, dice and blackjack tables.

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Escaped prison inmate Billy Ray Gray, 27, was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 5, 1969, Marietta Daily Journal, as being back at the Reidsville State Prison because of Smyrna Patrolman Jim Tarver. Gray was arrested by Tarver as the convict stood at the intersection of Ward and Cherokee streets in Smyrna the day before.

An intense manhunt had been underway for Gray after he escaped from the Hay-Gantt Funeral Home in Marietta the week before. Gray had been released from maximum security at Reidsville to Cobb Police officers to attend his brother’s funeral. During the service, Gray “broke open a bolted door” and escaped. The convict was also said to have made a previous escape attempt at the funeral of his grandmother several years earlier.

In the Thursday, Nov. 6, 1969, paper it was reported that nine people were arrested and $17,000 in gambling money was confiscated in a raid on a gambling house near Acworth. Officers said the operation was linked with interstate crime activities as well as other gambling operations in metro Atlanta. One officer described the house as a major gambling center, with cards, dice and blackjack tables.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator and Historian for the Marietta Daily Journal.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator and Historian for the Marietta Daily Journal.

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