This week’s Time Capsule looks at a knife attack, the Compulsory Education Law, Apollo 12 and a jail break.

100 years ago …

The Thursday, Nov. 27, 1919, edition of The Cobb County Times reported that an old family argument between Roy Medford and his brother-in-law, F.L. Clark, took a serious turn the Saturday before on Marietta Square.

After exchanging some heated words, Medford was said to have struck Clark in the face. Clark responded by pulling a knife.

The altercation ended with Medford in Nolan’s sanitarium suffering from “a dangerous cut over the heart and another on the right side of the body.”

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Starting on Jan. 1, 1920, the paper reported that the Compulsory Education Law would go into effect.

The law forced every child between 8-14 to attend public or private schools for at least six months of each year. The act also provided money for an enforcement officer to both the Marietta City Schools and Cobb County School District boards of education. These officers were to ensure that children attended school and to prosecute the parents or guardians who did not send their child to school.

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The Holland Realty Company was reported as breaking records for selling real estate in Cobb County over a two-day period the week before.

The company sold over $43,000 worth in Marietta and Cobb County in under 48 hours during two auction sales. The B.T. Frey property in Marietta brought in $17,000 and the late Judge Bowie place near Smyrna brought in $26,000.

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Marietta High School mathematics teacher Flora Cox was reported as having an accident while watching the Marietta and Rome high school football game the Friday before. Cox seriously sprained her ankle in a fall when some of the players crossed over the field line during the game. Despite the incident, Marietta sent Rome home with a score of 12-0.

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The Marietta Journal appears to have not published a paper for the week of Nov. 28, 1919, because of the Thanksgiving holiday.

50 years ago …

“Leaving the ‘unreal’ world of the moon far behind,” the Sunday, Nov. 23, 1969, Marietta Daily Journal reported that Apollo 12’s astronauts sailed Yankee Clipper into Earth’s gravity and lined up a course for a Pacific Ocean splashdown.

The following Tuesday, it was reported that Charles “Pete” Conrad, Alan L. Bean and Richard F. Gordon “landed flawlessly in the rolling South Pacific at 3:58 p.m. EST after a blazing re-entry at temperatures ranging up to 5,000 degrees.” The splashdown in 24-mile-per-hour winds and 11-foot seas ended a 10-day, half-million mile round trip to the Ocean of Storms where Conrad and Bean walked twice on the moon and left behind a geological experiment station that would broadcast information for at least a year.

President Richard Nixon telephoned the men in their isolation trailer on the USS Hornet and promoted them on the spot from commanders to captains.

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In the Monday, Nov. 24, 1969, paper it was reported that over 100,000 Georgians, many family groups with small children, attended an open house for Lockheed Georgia.

One of the features of the event was walking through “the cavernous cargo bay of aircraft No. 10” of the C5 production line. Two other C5 Galaxies were on the ground and another set of planes were in flight, conducting tests of instrument approaches.

M.L. St. John, public relations officer at Lockheed, said the crowd exceeded any other public turnout in the company’s history.

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Four inmates of the Cobb County jail were reported in the Tuesday, Nov. 25, 1969, paper as having escaped the night before.

The quartet overpowered a guard who had opened the cellblock where the men were housed to remove another prisoner at 11 p.m. that night. The men rushed the public elevator and made their way to the main floor of the then-new Public Safety Building.

When the doors opened on the first floor, the prisoners came face to face with two Cobb County police officers reporting for their midnight shift.

All four were arrested and re-jailed, but one man was shot in the right arm and neck as he ran across Lawrence Street toward the Cobb Federal Savings and Loan building.

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Willis High School was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 26, 1969, paper as having a “Thanks for America” rally the night before that was attended by over 1,000 people.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator and Historian for the Marietta Daily Journal.

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