This week’s Time Capsule looks at a Coca-Cola lawsuit, WWI soldiers, Nikalgin and a tram accident.

100 years ago …

The Thursday, May 29, 1919, edition of The Cobb County Times reported that the “biggest stunt of the age” was completed. Following the previous week’s reports that Navy seaplanes NC-1 and NC-3 were unable to continue in the famous Trans-Atlantic flight, NC-4 was reported as having reached Lisbon, Portugal, on May 27, 1919, in little more than 26 hours of flight time. The plane was under the command of Lt. Cmdr. Albert Cushing Read and was “the first airship of any kind to have crossed the Atlantic Ocean under its own power and through its natural element.”

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The colors of the various organizations in the 82nd Division were reported as being permanently placed in the state capitol building in Atlanta. One of each of the standards was to be recorded in the war records for the units. Marietta, which had three regimental colors in the 157th Artillery Brigade, were to stay in Atlanta, but would be grouped together.

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The firm of Crowe & Holland — composed of Arthur L. Crowe, son of Dr. Crowe of Smyrna, and Wm. Tate Holland of Marietta — were reported as having purchased the Fire Insurance Agency of Dobbs & Gurley. The firm was opening offices in the Holland Realty Co. in the Reynolds building.

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Marietta’s $15,000 quota in the Methodist Church’s Centenary Drive was reported as being exceeded by $7,994 for a total of $22,994 raised.

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Page 5 was dedicated to articles and photographs about the city of Smyrna, which was dubbed “A Choice Residential Town, Wide-Awake and Surrounded by Some of Cobb’s Best Farm Land.” Detailed were the Bank of Smyrna, Mountcastle’s Drug Store, the farm and residence of renowned farmer J. Gid Morris and J.W. Petty’s store and warehouse.

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The Friday, May 30, 1919, edition of The Marietta Journal reported that the Coca-Cola Company had been denied trademark protection by a U.S. District Court in the case of “Koke Co. of America et al. vs. Coca Cola Co.” in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

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When the government called for field glasses early in WWI for soldiers, J.T. Anderson turned over a pair to Col. Earl d’Arcy Pierce of the 319th Field Artillery. Col. Pierce, who recently returned from overseas, was reported as giving Anderson back the glasses with a silver service-plate added to the case. The plate was engraved the dates the glasses sailed away and returned with the American Expeditionary Force and a list of the battles that they had observed.

George Goumas of Marietta, who also recently returned home, was reported as wearing the Distinguished Service Cross that he won during the fighting in the Battle of the Argonne.

Lt. Leon “Rip” Blair, 89th Infantry, was reported as having landed in New York. Rip, who went overseas with the Dixie Division, was the last of the four Blair brothers to return home from the Army.

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Mrs. J.T. Marr was reported as leaving the Sunday before for Atlanta to spend the week with her brother, Milton Powell — who had been reported dead on Christmas Day and then received a telegram from him on Easter morning that he was alive and safe.

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“Nikalgin, the external anesthetic used successfully in Army hospitals on the Verdun and Somme fronts, and at Paris,” was the invention of an American electrical engineer, according to a report in the June edition of Popular Mechanics Magazine. The inventor was also said to have created “a jet for applying the solution with sufficient force to penetrate gauze dressings and pus-coated surfaces.” The medicine was comprised of quinine, hydrochloric acid and urea.

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On the Editorial Page, the editors had the following items:

♦ “Mysterious murders in Pike and church burning in Putnam do not contribute anything to the peace and welfare of the races in Georgia, and no effort should be spared to solve these crimes and punish the perpetrators.”

♦ “The Alpharetta Free press writes up a bunch of weddings ahead of time, and then just checks ‘em off by number to its readers as they occur. Good idea, so when the editor goes fishing, the printer can tend to things easily.”

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In the Clippings and Comments column, where the editors responded to items in other newspapers, the following item from the Alpharetta Free Press appeared:

“(Former Secretary of the Treasury William Gibbs McAdoo Jr. of Marietta) is being put forward as the Democratic candidate for president. They say he cusses, and it is believed this will be necessary to win next time.”

The Journal editor’s responded with, “We don’t know how much good the cussing will do to get a man there, but if he has half the troubles to face after getting there that (President Woodrow Wilson) has had, he will need the answer to many prayers to pull him through even a four-year term.”

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In the “News From Over The County” column:

♦ Mt. Olivet section — Jim Owens was reported as having fallen out of his barn loft while feeding his livestock the Sunday morning before. Owens did not break any bones, but received several bruises and was out of work for a few days.

50 years ago …

In the Monday, May 26, 1969, Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that a tram loaded with spectators at the Atlanta Golf Classic had a tire blowout and jackknifed the day before, injuring six people. The accident occurred when a heavy thunderstorm broke out. Spectators jumped all over the side of the tram and were hanging onto it when the tire blew out, causing a jackknife before crashing into a tree.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator and Historian for the Marietta Daily Journal.

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