This week’s Time Capsule looks at the famous Trans-Atlantic flight, Prohibition events and Apollo 10.

100 years ago …

The Thursday, May 22, 1919, edition of The Cobb County Times reported that when the Navy seaplanes – NC-1, NC-3 and NC-4 – arrived at Ponta Delgada in the Azores, one of the greatest feats in the history of heavier than air flying had been accomplished.

The Marietta Journal the next day reported that three Marietta boys were part of the famous event – Cmdr. John Towers, nephew of Tallullah and Mary Towers; Cmdr. King Awtrey, who was in command of the Destroyer Gamble; and Lt. Robt. Adair Awtrey of the U.S.S. Cassin.

The planes began the world famous Trans-Atlantic flight from Rockaway Beach, New York, on May 8, 1919, heading for Halifax, Nova Scotia. The NC-1 and NC-3 made the trip in nine hours, but NC-4 had engine trouble and had to stop off at Chatham, Massachusetts. On May 10, 1919, the NC-1 and NC-3 left Halifax and arrived at Trepassey Bay, New Foundland, 460 miles away, six hours later. NC-4, with repaired engines left Chatham and joined the others at Trepassey Bay.

On May 17, 1919, the three planes left Trepassey Bay for the Azores, 1,350 miles away. NC-4 made the trip in 15 hours, but the other two planes were entangled in fog and had to land on the ocean roughly 50 miles from the Azores. NC-1 was found and towed to port by U.S. destroyers, while NC-3 spent 50 hours out on the ocean’s waves before making it in under its own power.

NC-3 and NC-1 were unable to continue from the Azores to Spain. NC-4, which had trouble at the start, was reported as the only one that will finish the trip to the European continent.

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Page 3 was dedicated to articles and photographs about the city of Powder Springs, which was dubbed “Rich in Opportunity to the Industrial Man or Farmer.”

Detailed were the warehouse of C.M. McIntyre, a dealer in fertilizer; the intersection of Pleasant and Busy streets; the Bank of Powder Springs; the Butner Brothers store; and the various buildings of the Seventh District Agricultural and Mechanical School, which is now the campus of McEachern High School.

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James, the 13-year-old son of Charlie Lewis in the Ligon District of Bartow County, was reported as having died the Monday before after being dragged for over half a mile by a frightened mule.

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The Friday, May 23, 1919, edition of The Marietta Journal reported that Capt. H.W. Hays and six Army men established a recruiting station in Army tents in Glover Park. The men, expected to be there for a week, were seeking recruits to enlist for 1-3 year terms. The pay for a private was $30 per month with food, clothing and medical services for free.Hm

The 82nd Division of the Army was also reported as arriving in installments at Camp Gordon, returning men from Marietta and the county following the end of WWI.

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Sheriff W.E. Swanson was reported as having in his possession “one of the new swindling blind tiger whiskey cans” that was discovered in the woods beyond Cole’s pasture the week before. The can contained one-half pint of whiskey placed in a piece of pipe fixed inside the neck of the container and surrounded “like a small island” by water in the body of the can.

The Journal editors also carried a story about a peculiar incident in Alabama where a man reported his neighbor for running a small still. When the still’s owner heard rumor of a raid, he sold it at a very low price to the man who had reported him. When the raiding party arrived, they found the new owner operating it in his home.

A third story reported that moonshiners were soon going to be hunted by revenue agents from airplanes in the mountains of the South. U.S. Commissioner of Internal Revenue Daniel C. Roper asked the war department for the loan of several planes. He was expected to equip them with cameras to take pictures of the stills while flying low and use the images as evidence in court.

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The federal government was reported as having paid a claim of $176,000 from the seizure of cotton during the Civil War. The claim came from a corporation whose stockholders had kept their records and pressed the fight for years.

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Three boys in Atlanta were reported as having stolen a car from a county policeman on Atlanta’s streets. The boys were captured and locked up in a detention home, only to escape by making a rope of bed clothes and going out the window.

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In the “News From Over The County” column:

♦ Blackwell section – Journal correspondent Jolly Jack wrote that the Methodist Church launched the Sunday before a nationwide campaign to raise funds for their 100th anniversary of the first Methodist Missionary Movement in the country. All members of the Blackwell Methodist Church were asked to contribute.

♦ Mableton section – Journal correspondent Eugene wrote that a little girl was run down and killed by a car at the Union Grove singing the Sunday before. Eugene did not know the names or any particulars about the incident.

50 years ago …

The Monday, May 19, 1969, Marietta Daily Journal reported that Walter E. Jackson, a veteran employee of the newspaper, was one of a group of people to watch Apollo 10 blast off for the moon the day before. Jackson, a truck driver for The Daily Journal and Times Co. for 18½ years, was one of 29 sportsmen from Cobb, Paulding and Fulton counties that were in Florida on a deep-sea fishing excursion at the time of the launch.

Also in that day’s paper, it was reported that the Apollo 10 astronauts awoke to a breakfast of fruit cocktail and cornflakes that morning at 106,000 miles out in space.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator and Historian for the Marietta Daily Journal.

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