This week’s Time Capsule looks at Smyrna’s WWI hero, the death of a senator’s wife and a Vietnam casualty.

100 years ago …

The Thursday, June 12, 1919, edition of The Cobb County Times reported that Austell was the first to welcome soldiers and sailors home from WWI. The men were entertained at a large picnic that was attended by 800 people.

The reporter wrote that “bully beef and all of the horrible foods of battle days (were) forgotten as basket after basket of fried chicken and chocolate cake disappeared.”

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Lt. Gen. Hunter Liggett, commanding the Third Army of the American Expeditionary Forces, recommended that Maj. Gen. Charles D. Rhodes receive the Distinguished Service Cross. Rhodes was in command of the 157th Artillery Brigade when they were training in Marietta and during early service in France.

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Brady L. Cash of Smyrna was recorded as being in the same attack Alvin C. York of Pall Mall, Tennessee, who was reported as “the greatest individual hero of WWI.”

York was in Company G, 328th Infantry, while Cash was in Company H. The two companies were said to always make their attacks together.

In October 1918, the two companies were sent against a ridge in the Argonne Forest, which was infested with German machine guns. It seemed an impossible objective until York made his way to the rear. With nearly all of his companions killed or wounded, York opened fire on the enemy’s rear, killing about 25 and taking 132 prisoners.

Cash and another man were reported as the only two unwounded men left in their squad.

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Maj. E. Victor Keller, who died at the general hospital at Fort McPherson in Atlanta on June 3, 1919, received a military escort to his burial in Marietta the Friday before.

Keller was “one of the best known men of Atlanta, having for years been connected with Dr. Michael Hoke at the Crippled Children’s Hospital.” He also had the reputation of being “one of the ablest medical men at Fort McPherson.”

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In the News About the City column was the following item:

♦Lee Brown, who was with the Marines on the USS Utah, was visiting his sister, L.C. Land, and his mother, Mrs. W.P. Brown, of the Blackwells area. Brown was among the Marines that met President Woodrow Wilson when he landed in France.

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The Friday, June 13, 1919, edition of The Marietta Journal reported on the death of Mrs. Marion Cobb Smith, wife of U.S. Sen. Hoke Smith.

Mrs. Smith died early the Saturday morning before in Atlanta following several years of poor health. All members of the immediate family were with her at the time of her death, except for Lt. Cmdr. Austin Simpson – who was with naval forces overseas.

She was the daughter of the famous Confederate leader Gen. Thomas R.R. Cobb and granddaughter of Judge Joseph Henry Lumpkin, the first chief justice of Georgia’s Supreme Court.

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Two black men from Atlanta, visiting Marietta the Thursday night before, were reported as having decided they needed a new wardrobe. The men broke into W.S. Kelly’s men’s clothing store on the east side of Marietta Square and took two suits, shoes, hats, shirts and other apparel, while leaving their old clothes behind. The men then returned to Marietta the following night wearing the stolen items and were spotted by police.

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Doyle Bulter of Marietta’s D.P. Butler Motor Co. was reported as having his new Ford stolen in Atlanta the Wednesday before.

Butler left his car parked on Walton Street on the same block as the post office. The theft was said to have been part of “the organized band, which has long been operating in Atlanta.”

The Journal editors also wrote that, “Atlanta should spare no expense in breaking up this gang.”

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In the Personal Mention column, written by Society Editor Mrs. D.C. Cole, were the following items:

♦Bartow Ford, the general manager of the Baragua Sugar Company of Cuba, was with his family in Atlanta for a month and visited his sister, Laurie Ford, in Marietta the week before.

♦Mrs. Ed Groves received a cablegram from her husband, Capt. Groves, the Saturday before that said he had broken his leg in the port of Brest, France, as he was getting ready to sail home.

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On the Editorial Page, the editors had the following item:

♦ “Little Jane, 5, has learned to use the family credit at the village soda fount, when her father heard of it, he denied its future use. The next day, Jane slipped into her accustomed seat at the fountain and gave this order: ‘Give me a glass of water, please, and put a cherry in it.’”

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The editors published a poem by Ada T.W. on Page 8, titled “Spring in the Kennesaws.”

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A story out of Fitzgerald reported that a 50-year-old black woman was burned to death at her daughter’s home the Monday before. The woman was using gasoline to straighten her hair when it ignited from a lamp.

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Col. Earl DeArcy Pearce, commanding officer of the 319th Field Artillery, received a brass trophy the Wednesday before from the men of his regiment, who were stationed in Bordeaux, France. The regiment was one of the three in the 157th Artillery Brigade and received their colors in Marietta and carried them to France.

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50 years ago

The death of Sp/4 James “Harry” Harrison Hopkins was reported in the Tuesday, June 10, 1969, Marietta Daily Journal. He died the Wednesday before in Tuy Hoa, South Vietnam in an accident involving a mine detonation, which came 15 days before his tour of duty would have ended.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator and Historian for the Marietta Daily Journal.

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