This week’s Time Capsule looks at a lawsuit, rock throwing, Prohibition, a train derailment and vandalism.

100 years ago …

The Thursday, Jan. 22, 1920, edition of The Cobb County Times reported the City of Marietta won the $30,000 lawsuit brought by Mrs. Carrie Lehn Kraeger for the death of her son, Pvt. Albert H. Kraeger, the Friday before in U.S. District Court. On July 18, 1918, Kraeger was killed on Church Street when he came into contact with a live electrical wire hanging across the sidewalk.

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At the last regular meeting of the County School Board, Harriet Robeson was chosen to be the truant officer, supervising the attendance of children under the compulsory school law that went into effect on Jan. 1, 1920.

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In commemoration of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s birthday, all of the banks in Marietta were to close that Monday.

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Miller’s, a “cash store” in Marietta, ran a full page ad announcing the second week of their “Great Closing Out Sale.” Some of the offers were Turkish Towels, size 18x30, for 47 cents; children’s hosiery for 33 cents, cashmere hosiery for 39 cents and ladies’ silk hosiery for $1.95; American Lady Corsets with front and back lace for $4.19; Bungalow aprons for $2.19 and children’s dresses for $1.98.

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In the “News From Our Correspondents” column, were the following items:

♦ Acworth section — “For performing the greatest amount of war work (for World War I) of any woman in Pickens County,” Mrs. M.K. Williams of Tate, formerly of Acworth, was presented with a gold service pin.

♦ McAfee section — Several community members were reported as slipping and falling on the ice during a heavy sleet. Among them was Whit Chastain, who fractured two bones in his shoulders.

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The Times editors ran an item on the Editorial Page titled, “The Matter of Throwing Rocks,” which discussed two recent incidents and the destruction of property.

The first involved children throwing rocks at a train passing through on the Marietta-Fulton County line. One of the rocks hit and broke a glass window that cut the face of a passenger.

The second incident, witnessed by a Marietta couple returning home around 10 p.m. one evening, involved three boys about 12 years old throwing rocks at a street light. After several attempts to hit it, one of the boys was successful in breaking the light and darkening the corner.

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The Friday, Jan. 23, 1920, edition of The Marietta Journal reported that “H.J. Sosobee, an aged Confederate veteran,” had died at the Soldiers Home in Atlanta and was buried in Marietta the Thursday before in the city’s Confederate Cemetery.

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In the “Current Events” column on the front page, were the following items:

♦ 800 “afflicted” people were said to have visited “the healing layman James Moore Hickson during his brief stay in Atlanta and a number of undoubted cures are reported to date.”

♦ The Prohibition enforcement forces were reported as having captured 200 moonshine stills in the Southeastern territory in the first week of “the great drive.”

♦ Purse snatching was reported as being a prevalent crime in Atlanta within the past week.

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On the Editorial Page, the Journal editors wrote the following item:

♦ “The Brooklyn undertaker who furnished the wood alcohol to make the whiskey that killed so many people in several eastern cities was at least promoting the business of his profession, even though he may not have got any of the business.”

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In the “News From Our Correspondents” column, were the following items:

♦ Due West section — “Two airplanes flying over this place (the Monday before) going in the direction of Atlanta, caused the school children to rush out to see.”

♦ Lost Mountain section — Journal correspondent Allen also wrote about the airplanes, saying — “The roaming of the aeroplanes are frequently heard and we expect to be hit with a cigar stub almost any time.”

♦ Macland section — “W.P. Anderson is remodeling his dwelling, adding more rooms and putting on a new roof. Mr. Nelson and his brother, Willie, are two of our model farmers. They averaged 50 bushels of corn and more than a bale of cotton to the acre (in 1919). The boll weevil did not bother them much, because they stuck so close to their work that they scared them out of the field.”

50 years ago …In the Sunday, Jan. 18, 1970, Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that a 10-car derailment, which four trainmen “miraculously” walked away from, tied up traffic in Cobb for six hours the Friday before.

The nine cars and one engine were “masses of twisted steel” after the derailment with some tipped over a parallel set of tracks and others tumbled down a deep ravine. A second engine managed to remain on the tracks.

The incident happened when the freight train struck a “boom on a ballast cleaner — a machine which cleans dirt from supporting stones alongside the tracks.” The train crew was said to know that a cleaner was in the area, but did not expect the boom to be over their tracks.

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Vandals were reported in the Monday, Jan. 19, 1970, paper as entering Campbell High School through an unlocked band room door and trashing three rooms along with principal R.L. Ash’s office. The vandals were said to have shattered the glass in a door, cut the principal’s chair into shreds, broken a music machine, knocked out 15 windows and six door glasses, and ransacked the library, kitchen and dining rooms.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator and Historian for the Marietta Daily Journal.

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