This week’s Time Capsule looks at the sale of Coca-Cola, a foul crime and a condemnation lawsuit.

100 years ago …

The Thursday, July 31, 1919, edition of The Cobb County Times reported that in the rural sections all over the county, records of attendance at the schools were being broken.

Superintendent Awtrey thought the gain in attendance was due to “greater interest in education being manifested by the parents.” Another theory suggested that the children were racing back after having been kept out of school last winter due to the Spanish Influenza epidemic.

♦ ♦ ♦

Cobb County was reported as having over $1 million worth of automobiles, which was about one automobile for every six families. Nebraska had recently reported that one family out every five in the state had an automobile.

♦ ♦ ♦

The Friday, Aug. 1, 1919, edition of The Marietta Journal carried a story on the front page from The Atlanta Journal that reported “the Coca-Cola company of Atlanta, capitalized at $50,000, has been sold for $25 million to New York financial interests.”

The owners of the company, with one exception, were all residents of Atlanta and members of Asa G. Candler Sr.’s family. The sale of the company included “the name, trade mark and formula for Coca-Cola, the contracts and good will of the company.” The sale included the new plant that was being constructed at North Avenue and Plum Street in Atlanta, but did not include the bottling rights or a number of properties owned by Asa G. Candler Inc.

♦ ♦ ♦

A second story on the front reported on a “foul crime committed in City of Marietta.”

The Thursday before at about 10 a.m., “little Eugene McEntyre went to the home of Julia Green on Waterman Street and found her with her face swollen, bruised and bleeding, in a semi-conscious condition.” She was rushed to Dr. Nolan’s sanitarium and found to have a broken jaw from having her face and head beaten severely with a heavy instrument causing both eyes to become swollen shut. In her condition, Green stated that she was attacked in her sleep the night before. She claimed that she had chased away from her yard the day before an unknown black man. Green died later at 4 p.m. that Thursday.

♦ ♦ ♦

J.H. Wilson, a World War I soldier taking a rehabilitation course at the college of agriculture in Athens, was reported as learning when he came home to “the mountain section of North Carolina” that the War Department had reported him dead. Wilson’s wife was said to have “already spent most of her first allotment of his war risk insurance.”

♦ ♦ ♦

On the Editorial Page, the editors had the following items:

♦”Is there another state in the union with so much wealth as Georgia collecting as little taxes? We do not believe there is.”

♦”Down in Macon when burglars can find no other booty they take your dog. One citizen first lost his mule and then the bull dog he bought to guard it.”

♦ ♦ ♦

In the “Personal Mention” column, written by Society Editor Mrs. D.C. Cole, was the following item:

♦”There has been quite an interesting exhibit in the window at Eisman Brothers in Atlanta, this week, of things brought over from France by Earnest Gifford. There are a number of big French and German shells made into vases, a beautiful little aeroplane, etc., all made by Gifford.”

♦ ♦ ♦

In the “Around The Square” column were the following items:

♦A $15,000 shoe sale was going to take place soon at the W.A. Florence Dry Goods Company in order to make room for the remodeling of the shoe department.

♦The new building for Ralph W. Northcutt, the agent for Reo, Buick and Dodge automobiles, was nearing completion.

Northcutt had also taken out a full page advertisement in the Cobb County Times that week announcing Buick’s new 1920 Model K Series automobiles. The Buick Model K-Six-44 three passenger roadster and the Buick Model K-Six-45 five passenger touring car were both priced at $1,495, the Buick Model K-six-49 seven passenger touring car was priced at $1,785, the Buick Model K-Six-47 five passenger touring car was priced at $2,255, the Buick Model K-Six-46 touring coupe was priced at $2,085 and the Buick Model K-Six-50 seven passenger sedan was priced at 2,695.

50 years ago …

The editors announced on the front page of the Sunday, July 27, 1969, Marietta Daily Journal the switch to a new six-column format for Page 1. The new column measure was designed to be “more readable, more attractive and in keeping with a popular trend in newspaper design.” That edition also marked the introduction of a new Page 1 feature, titled HOT LINE, which answered questions by readers who contacted the paper by telephone or letter.

♦ ♦ ♦

In the Tuesday, July 29, 1969, paper it was reported that “Lockheed-Georgia officials declined comment (that day) on a statement by Air Force Secretary Robert C. Seamans that he was ‘reserving judgement’ on picking up the option for 39 additional C5 Galaxy aircraft.” Seamans revealed the Monday before in Washington that negotiations between the Air Force and Lockheed were underway and “for the purpose of doing away with what Seamans termed ‘ambiguities’ in the C5 contract.”

♦ ♦ ♦

A lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court was reported in the Friday, Aug. 1, 1969, paper as having charged members of the Cobb County Commission with “conspiring with a large Atlanta development company to violate the civil and constitutional rights” of two black Vinings land owners. The suit, the result of condemnation proceedings, sought $300,000 in actual damages and $150,000 in punitive damages.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator and Historian for the Marietta Daily Journal.

0
0
0
0
0

Recommended for you