This week’s Time Capsule looks at Marietta’s The Daily Rebel newspaper, lawsuits, the Victory Liberty Loan campaign, the deaths of soldiers and a collision between a horse and a car.

100 years ago …

The Thursday, April 24, 1919, edition of The Cobb County Times reported that the United Daughters of the Confederacy had arranged an exhibit in one of the show windows of Hodges Drug Company the Tuesday before.

One of the items of interest was “an old copy of Marietta’s only daily newspaper, ‘The Daily Rebel,’ which was published (in Marietta) during a period of 1863 by Henry Watterson and Mr. Neal of Marietta.” The paper bore the date of Oct. 22, 1863. It was received by Mrs. J.H. Patton from Mrs. N.B.E. Irwin of Westfield, New York, who found it in some of the trunks of her brother.

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Annie Jenkins, a Cobb County girl living near Bolton, was awarded $10,525 in damages from the Whittier Mills Company with interest since Dec. 13, 1917, for injuries received during her employment. In her first trial, Jenkins was awarded $3,500. The company, however, made a motion for a new trial that was granted. In the second trial, which lasted a week, the jury awarded her a sum that was almost three times the original case’s verdict.

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Following a disagreement on the lunacy commission in the case of Naomi Campbell, the counsel for her defense immediately filed for a new trial. The request was heard the Monday before in Cumming before Judge N.A. Morris, who threw it out. Campbell, formerly the head of the Undenominational Orphans’ Home at Collins Switch, had been convicted on two charges of cruelty to children and sentenced to two years at the state prison farm.

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In the “News From Our Correspondents” column, were the following items:

♦ East of Macedonia section — Ernest Arrington was reported as becoming injured the week before while unloading baled hay, which fell on top of him.

♦ Kennesaw section — A mad dog scare was reported in the section, but there were no new cases of rabies found.

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The Friday, April 25, 1919, edition of The Marietta Journal reported that Marietta started her Victory Liberty Loan campaign off with a big celebration the Wednesday before. All of the stores on the Square were closed and the hitching of horses was not allowed at the railings around Glover Park so there would be more room for the celebrants.

One of the highlights of the event was the arrival of a two-man tank with a one-pound rapid-fire gun. The tank was able to be “moved about with considerable speed and agility.” Many “young folks” were allowed rides both inside and on top of the tank as it made frequent trips around the park. At one point, the tank was parked in front of the courthouse and was covered with so many small boys that it looked like an ant-hill.

One of the campaign’s tanks was also reported as having “turned turtle” while doing a demonstration at Calhoun earlier in the week. No one was hurt and it was righted by the large crowd of spectators.

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Georgia’s 100,000-mark in motor vehicles was passed the Tuesday before when a license tag bearing the number “100000” was issued to J.H. Smith, professor of accounting in the Commercial High School in Atlanta.

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On the Editorial Page, the editors wrote the following item:

♦ ”Marietta (can’t) grow any more until it gets more houses for the people to live in. But it might be worth while living in a tent just so it was pitched in Marietta. Come on, folks, and bring your tents with you.”

♦ ”Funny how all the wet-minded folks are blaming the Chicago whiskey on the women, very much in the same way that Adam ‘passed the buck’ to Eve on the apple-stealing charge.”

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In the “News From Over The County” column, were the following items from the Due West section by Journal correspondent Amor:

♦ “There has been a very peculiar scent around here of late, and several land holders have been looking up and down the branches of their farms.”

♦ Lon Phillips, who was raised in the section, was reported as shot in Anderson, Alabama, the Tuesday before by a black man and was recovering with his father, Joe P. Phillips, at his bedside.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, April 20, 1969, Marietta Daily Journal, the cause of death for Pfc. George W. Walker, 18, of Atlanta, was reported. Walker, who drowned Sunday, April 6, 1969, while swimming with friends, was bitten by a water moccasin and according to the medical examiner “had enough of the snake’s poison in him ‘to kill several men.’” Judging from the spread of the fang marks on the body, it was believed that the snake’s head was the size of a man’s fist.

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A collision between a horse and a car on Allgood Road from the night before was reported in the Monday, April 21, 1969, paper. According to a police report, a car traveling east on Allgood at 2:35 a.m. hit and killed the horse at the driveway of Happy Valley Farms. The horse was thrown 100-feet down the road and the car struck the ditch to the right of the highway, coming to a halt 20-feet from the horse. The driver suffered lacerations to his hand and face.

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1st Lt. Travis B. Lee Jr., 23, of Sherwood Drive in Marietta, was reported in the Tuesday, April 22, 1969, paper as the county’s latest Vietnam casualty. Lt. Lee was killed on April 17, 1969, while out on patrol in Vietnam.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator and Historian for the Marietta Daily Journal.

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