This week’s Time Capsule looks at a windstorm, a robbery, Maj. Gen. Lucius Clay and World War II events.

100 years ago …

The Tuesday, March 30, 1920, edition of The Cobb County Times reported that a great and deadly windstorm hit several Georgia towns the Sunday before. The storms were the “frayed edge of a series of great tornadoes” that swept the West and the South.

The wire service from “the crippled towns” of LaGrange, West Point, Macon, Washington, Williamson and Jackson estimated the total dead at 76 people. LaGrange was the worst hit and had 18 deaths. West Point, which had been recovering from a recent flood, saw its entire business district wiped out.

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Dr. Leslie L. Blair of Marietta was reported as receiving from French Cabinet Chief Albert Baucher “the medal de la ministre-de-l’ Instructors Publique” for his services with the American Expeditionary Force in France in World War I.

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Roy Mullinax, the night operator of the Bell Telephone Exchange in Woodstock, was reported as being robbed the Monday night before of 75-cents by a black man who came to the exchange wanting to telephone a doctor. When the physician refused to come out unless a payment of 36-cents was left for him with Mullinax, the man drew a pistol and demanded Mullinax’s money.

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The Friday, April 2, 1920, edition of The Marietta Journal reported that John T. Dorsey received a commission in the mail to Assistant Judge Advocate in Chief for the Sons of Confederate Veterans. The commission came from Gen. Nathan B. Forrest of Memphis, who was the Commander in Chief of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and son of the famous Confederate general of the same name.

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In the “News From Our Correspondents” column, the Highlands correspondent “Lily-U-No.” wrote that two Marietta boys camped on Kennesaw Mountain the Saturday before and the following morning scared their community by shooting of guns. Two good hunting dogs were reported as being shot and several children in the community frightened.

75 years ago ...

In the Wednesday, March 28, 1945, Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that 2nd Lt. D.F. Nations Jr., son of D.F. Nations Sr. of Acworth, was killed in action in Germany during World War II on March 16, 1945. Nations, who had just gotten married in October 1944, went overseas in January 1945 and was serving in the Infantry with Patton’s Third Army.

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Marine Private Bessie Ruth Jordan of Smyrna was reported in the Thursday, March 29, 1945, paper as having enlisted in the Marine Corps Women’s Reserve.

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Marietta native Maj. Gen. Lucius Clay was reported in the Friday, March 30, 1945, paper as being assigned the role of civil affairs administrator in occupied Germany. Clay, according to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, would leave the country in a few days and serve as a deputy to Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower. Roosevelt said that Clay was particularly qualified for the German post because of his “splendid service in the civilian as well as the military branches of the government.”

Also that day, Deputy Sheriffs T.M. Bryan and P.M. Groover were reported as raiding a 2,000 gallon still that had been in full operation on a farm six miles from Marietta, just off old Sandtown Road. There were 150 gallons of corn liquor and “a great amount” of mash confiscated and destroyed.

50 years ago ...

In the Wednesday, April 1, 1970, paper it was reported that Spc. 4 Earl L. Poole, 31, of Acworth was killed in Vietnam in a mine explosion the Saturday before.

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Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator and Historian for the Marietta Daily Journal.

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