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The formal parlor at the Root House is set for a Victorian-style funeral.

The William Root House, 80 N. Marietta Parkway NW in Marietta, will have Mourning in the 1850s Flashlight Tours.

The self-guided flashlight tours will be Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29 from 5 to 8 p.m.

During the 1850s, Hannah and William Root shared their home with their children and extended family. Hannah Root’s father, Leonard Simpson, lived with the family and passed away on Oct. 11, 1856. For the month of October, the rooms inside the Root House will be decorated as they would have been following Leonard’s death. Curtains will be drawn, and rooms will be adorned with black crepe and ribbons.

Visitors will be able to view 19th century embalming equipment, mourning jewelry made from human hair and other curious artifacts related to death and mourning during the Victorian era.

In order to maintain social distancing guidelines, staff will be limiting the number of guests permitted in the house at one time.

Daytime tours are included in the cost of regular admission. Flashlight Tour tickets are $10 per person and may be purchased online at roothousemuseum.com/mourning.

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