On Saturday and Sunday, June 29-30, Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park will commemorate the 155th anniversary of the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. Carol Northcutt Worley and her eight-year-old great-granddaughter, Anna Ryan Reeser, will raise the flag at a flag ceremony to start the weekend.

Seventy-five years ago, Worley, at eight years old herself, observed the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain by assisting Lucinda Hardage in raising the flag in front of the mountain.

“I didn’t know Miss Lucinda Hardage. I’m not sure why they had me pull that flag. Miss Sadie (Sarah) Gober Temple, who wrote “The History of Cobb County, The First Hundred Years,” thought that our family was so linked to the Cobb County history that I guess that’s why she had me do that,” said Worley, who has lived in Cobb all of her life. Her family home place was at the base of Kennesaw Mountain.

Born in 1931 in Marietta, both of her parents were pioneer families of the community. Likewise, the Hardage family had a strong connection to the community.

Lucinda Hardage was a child when the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain took place. “Part of (Hardage’s) story was that she saw Indians coming through, maybe on The Trail of Tears. She even saw the Battle (of Kennesaw Mountain) go on and met some soldiers,” said Worley, who was married to Dan Worley, deceased. They have three grown daughters, nine grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren.

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Carol Northcutt Worley, 88, and her great-granddaughter Anna Ryan Reeser, 8, practice for the flag ceremony. Seventy-five years ago, Worley, at eight years old herself, observed the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain by assisting Lucinda Hardage in raising the flag in front of the mountain.

Worley recalled the 75th ceremony took place in the area where the Visitor’s Center is located today. “There was no paved road up Kennesaw Mountain,” she said. “There was no museum there when I was eight years old. The flag was different than our flag today. We have 50 stars and there were only 48 back then. I had on a white dress and it was dotted Swiss. I thought I was going to raise the flag. I was all set to pull that flag up and I knew just how to do it and everything. But Miss Lucinda reached over and she pulled it up. I didn’t get to. I was really disappointed, but I didn’t act up.”

On June 29, Worley will get a second chance to raise the flag with her eldest great-granddaughter.

“I am excited that I get to do the same thing that my great-grandmother did when she was my age. I go with my family to Kennesaw Mountain a lot and like to hike on the trails and to the top of the mountain. We look at the cannons and read some of the signs that tell about the war and we also go in the museum and look at everything in there,” said Anna Ryan Reeser, a rising fourth grader at West Side Elementary. She is the daughter of Carrie and Ryan Reeser of Marietta.

Kennesaw Mountain is a beautiful mainstay in the community. “The mountain has always been around in our lives,” said Melissa Callahan, who is married to Tim Callahan. They have two daughters and five grandchildren, including Reeser. “There’s a trench line right in mother and daddy’s driveway. We’ve grown up knowing the history of the battle. It’s neat to continue that on.”

Continuous programs are planned from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. To learn more about Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park and its many events, visit nps.gov/kemo/index.htm.

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