082119_MNS_nurse_award Codi Rhear

Codi Rhear, a Midtown resident and oncology nurse practitioner at Cancer Treatment Centers of America’s Atlanta hospital in Newnan, recently earned the national DAISY Award.

A local nurse has been honored for exceptional patient care.

Codi Rhear, a Midtown resident and oncology nurse practitioner at Cancer Treatment Centers of America’s Atlanta hospital in Newnan, recently earned the national DAISY Award.

The DAISY (Diseases Attacking the Immune SYstem) Award is given annually to nurses and nursing faculty and students for extraordinary care of their patients. It’s presented by the Glen Allen, California-based DAISY Foundation to employees at more than 3,400 healthcare facilities around the world.

The foundation estimates that more than 16,000 awards will be given out in 2019. Between 9,500 and 10,000 have already been doled out.

Rhear, who has worked at the hospital since August 2017, was nominated by a patient and his wife for comforting them during difficult moments. He said his passion for helping others is the driving force behind his decision to become a nurse. When he was young, Rhear’s grandmother died of cancer, sparking an interest in oncology that has manifested in his career. When asked why he chose to work in oncology, Rhear said oncology is a calling that chose him.

“I don’t always get to fix (patients) or cure them. You can’t always do that with cancer,” he said. “But if I can help people live life to the fullest and meet those goals, I feel like I’ve accomplished something.”

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