Plans for a new Harbin Clinic medical office building are now being reviewed by the Rome-Floyd County Building Inspection office.

Drafted by Peacock Architects, the new facility at the intersection of John Maddox Drive and Woodrow Wilson Way will be a two-story, 40,862-square-foot structure.

The new building, which is slated to house much of the Harbin women’s and children’s care programs, will include close to 50 examination rooms on the first floor of the building, which will feature more than 25,000 square feet of space. The second floor will have more than 15,000 square feet of working space.

Harbin CEO Kenna Stock said the first floor would be devoted primarily to the pediatric team while the second floor would house the women’s program and OB/GYN services.

Harbin Clinic Pediatrics is spread out across seven office locations. The two in Rome, in the Ansley Park complex on North Fifth Avenue and the office in the Physicians building on Turner McCall Boulevard will consolidate into the building when it comes online. Other pediatric offices are located in Cedartown, Cartersville and Adairsville, along with Pediatric Cardiology offices in Rome and Cartersville.

The Harbin Clinic Women’s Center is presently housed in the Physicians Building at 330 Turner McCall Blvd. on the Floyd Medical Center campus.

The new building will become home for approximately 110 Harbin employees once it is ready for occupancy in the Spring of 2020.

Stock did not respond to a question regarding the proposed budget for the new building.

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