Fulton County is under consideration to be a music industry oasis in Georgia.

Georgia Music Partners, in partnership with the county and Sound Diplomacy, has launched of a six-month comprehensive study of recording studios, rehearsal spaces, music venues and music festivals in Fulton.

“Music and culture are a big deal in Fulton County. Our music industry creates jobs and attracts businesses, tourism, and investment dollars,” Fulton Board of Commissioners Chair Robb Pitts said in a news release. “This work with Sound Diplomacy and (Georgia Music Partners) will tell the story of our music economy, so we can sustain and grow this industry in the future.”

The announcement was made at a July 25 news conference at Bravo Ocean Studios in southeast Atlanta. Georgia Music Partners is an Atlanta-based nonprofit working with state officials to foster growth in the music industry through an increase and jobs and tax incentives for music companies. Sound Diplomacy is a music policy consultancy firm that helps municipalities improve their economies and cultures through music, and it has offices in Barcelona, Berlin, London and New Orleans.

The news release stated the initiative aims to map related business across the county and assess their economic impact. Sound Diplomacy will manage the entire process, which will ultimately deliver both an ecological assessment of recording in the county and an economic impact report on the music industry in the county.

According to the release, Georgia Music Partners has been advocating on behalf of the state’s music industry for nearly 10 years.

To remain competitive, attract investment and create job growth in the music sector, Georgia Music Partners forged a relationship with Sound Diplomacy several years ago.

In the release, Georgia Music Partners President Shachar Oren said the company was delighted to engage with Sound Diplomacy and Fulton in this study, “and this is just the beginning.”

“Our work with Sound Diplomacy will help dig deeper and wider into data and surface information in an insightful and actionable way for the county,” he said.

Oren said Georgia Music Partners was looking forward to the work and the findings it will lead to, and how it will impact the bigger vision of music in Georgia.

A critical piece of the study will be direct engagement with stakeholders in the music industry in Fulton. Their feedback will combine with Sound Diplomacy’s research to develop a rich picture of the assets in this vertical of the county’s robust music ecosystem, the release stated.

Work has already begun on the study, with a tentative delivery date being January. Sound Diplomacy will regularly share updates on the progress of the study on its website.

“We’re thrilled to be starting this work to map the music ecosystem in Fulton County and determine its economic impact with such an impressive group of cities residing within Fulton County, spearheaded by Atlanta,” Shain Shapiro, founder and CEO of Sound Diplomacy, said in the release. “Music is one of Fulton County and the region’s largest exports and we know, once it’s fully quantified, the support will continue to grow across Greater Atlanta and Georgia as a whole.”

This is not the first time the county has gotten involved with the music industry. In June the board voted 6-0 to approve a $250,000 feasibility study for possibly building a second Grammy Museum in the county.

The original one is in Los Angeles and would not move to Atlanta. The museum is devoted to the music recording industry, and the Grammys are the annual awards the Recording Academy hands out.

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