US official: More airstrikes in Iraq
by Lolita C Baldor, Associated Press
August 20, 2014 12:10 PM | 628 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this April 12, 2013, file photo, a U.S. Marine F/A-18 Hornet jet flies low pass during Philippines-US joint military exercise in northern Philippines. President Barack Obama authorized U.S. airstrikes in northern Iraq, Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, warning they would be launched if needed to defend Americans from advancing Islamic militants and protect civilians under siege. Obama said American military planes already had carried out airdrops of humanitarian aid to tens of thousands of Iraqi religious minorities surrounded by militants and desperately in need of food and water. The Pentagon said the airdrops were performed by one C-17 and two C-130 cargo aircraft that together delivered a total of 72 bundles of food and water. They were escorted by two F/A-18 fighters. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
In this April 12, 2013, file photo, a U.S. Marine F/A-18 Hornet jet flies low pass during Philippines-US joint military exercise in northern Philippines. President Barack Obama authorized U.S. airstrikes in northern Iraq, Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, warning they would be launched if needed to defend Americans from advancing Islamic militants and protect civilians under siege. Obama said American military planes already had carried out airdrops of humanitarian aid to tens of thousands of Iraqi religious minorities surrounded by militants and desperately in need of food and water. The Pentagon said the airdrops were performed by one C-17 and two C-130 cargo aircraft that together delivered a total of 72 bundles of food and water. They were escorted by two F/A-18 fighters. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
slideshow

WASHINGTON (AP) — American fighter jets and drones conducted nearly a dozen airstrikes in Iraq since Tuesday, a U.S. official said, even as Islamic State militants threatened to kill a second American captive in retribution for any continued attacks.

The strikes came in the hours after militants released a gruesome video Tuesday showing U.S. journalist James Foley being beheaded.

According to the official, the latest airstrikes were in the area of the Mosul Dam and were aimed at helping Iraqi and Kurdish forces create a buffer zone at the key facility. The strikes, which now total nearly 90 since operations began, have helped Iraqi and Kurdish troops reclaim the dam from the insurgents.

The militants threatened to kill a second American journalist, Steven Sotloff, who is being held captive in case of airstrikes. The official was not authorized to discuss the ongoing operations publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Foley, a 40-year-old journalist from Rochester, New Hampshire, went missing in northern Syria while freelancing for Agence France-Presse and the Boston-based media company GlobalPost. Officials have said the video appears authentic.

Released on websites Tuesday, the video shows a man in an orange jumpsuit kneeling in the desert, next to a black-clad militant with a knife to his throat. Foley's name appears in both English and Arabic graphics on screen.

After the captive makes a statement, the masked man is shown apparently beginning to cut at the neck of the captive. The next shot appears to show the captive lying dead on the ground, his head on his body.

At the end of the video, a second man -- identified as Sotloff -- is shown and the militant warns that he could be next captive killed. Sotloff was kidnapped near the Syrian-Turkish border in August 2013 and freelanced for Time, the National Interest and MediaLine.



Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, and spam will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides