AP video journalist mourned in Tuscan hometown
August 15, 2014 12:45 PM | 547 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The coffin of Associated Press video journalist Simone Camilli is laid out in state, during the funeral ceremony at the Pitigliano Cathedral, Italy, Friday, Aug. 15, 2014. Camilli was killed Wednesday along with a freelance Palestinian translator working with him when ordnance left over from Israeli-Hamas fighting exploded as they were reporting on the aftermath of the war in the Gaza Strip. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis, Pool)
The coffin of Associated Press video journalist Simone Camilli is laid out in state, during the funeral ceremony at the Pitigliano Cathedral, Italy, Friday, Aug. 15, 2014. Camilli was killed Wednesday along with a freelance Palestinian translator working with him when ordnance left over from Israeli-Hamas fighting exploded as they were reporting on the aftermath of the war in the Gaza Strip. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis, Pool)
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Pier Luigi Camilli, right, father of Associated Press video journalist Simone Camilli, is flanked by Italian Foreign Minister Federica Mogherini, upon the arrival of the coffin of Simone Camilli at Ciampino's military airport, on the outskirts of Rome, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Six people, including an Associated Press video journalist, were killed Wednesday when leftover ordnance believed to have been dropped in an Israeli airstrike blew up in the Gaza Strip. Simone Camilli and his Palestinian translator, Ali Shehda Abu Afash, were covering the aftermath of the war between Israel and Islamic militants in Gaza when they were killed. The blast occurred as Gaza police engineers were trying to defuse unexploded ordnance fired by Israel. (AP Photo/Riccardo De Luca)
Pier Luigi Camilli, right, father of Associated Press video journalist Simone Camilli, is flanked by Italian Foreign Minister Federica Mogherini, upon the arrival of the coffin of Simone Camilli at Ciampino's military airport, on the outskirts of Rome, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Six people, including an Associated Press video journalist, were killed Wednesday when leftover ordnance believed to have been dropped in an Israeli airstrike blew up in the Gaza Strip. Simone Camilli and his Palestinian translator, Ali Shehda Abu Afash, were covering the aftermath of the war between Israel and Islamic militants in Gaza when they were killed. The blast occurred as Gaza police engineers were trying to defuse unexploded ordnance fired by Israel. (AP Photo/Riccardo De Luca)
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Maria Daniela Vigna touches the casket of her son, Associated Press video journalist Simone Camilli, as his father, Pierluigi Camilli, second left, a priest, left, and AP staff members watch during a private ceremony at Ben Gurion airport near Tel Aviv, Israel, before Camilli's body is returned to Italy, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Camilli was killed Wednesday, Aug. 13, in the Gaza Strip while covering the aftermath of the war between Israel and Islamic militants. A Palestinian translator working with Camilli, Ali Shehda Abu Afash, was also killed, and his funeral was held Wednesday. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Maria Daniela Vigna touches the casket of her son, Associated Press video journalist Simone Camilli, as his father, Pierluigi Camilli, second left, a priest, left, and AP staff members watch during a private ceremony at Ben Gurion airport near Tel Aviv, Israel, before Camilli's body is returned to Italy, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Camilli was killed Wednesday, Aug. 13, in the Gaza Strip while covering the aftermath of the war between Israel and Islamic militants. A Palestinian translator working with Camilli, Ali Shehda Abu Afash, was also killed, and his funeral was held Wednesday. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
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PITIGLIANO, Italy (AP) — Hundreds of mourners have packed the cathedral in this Tuscan hilltop town to remember Associated Press video journalist Simone Camilli, who was killed this week in the Gaza Strip.

Video images made by Camilli were projected onto a building beside the cathedral in Pitigliano, his hometown, and mourners streaming to the ceremony Friday were visibly moved as they paused to watch.

AP chief executive Gary Pruitt, speaking before the funeral Mass, lauded Camilli's commitment "to tell the human side of the story in a war" during nearly a decade with AP.

Camilli, his translator and four others died Wednesday when leftover ordnance believed to have been dropped in an Israeli airstrike blew up.

Camilli, who was 35, is survived by his long-time partner, a daughter, his parents and two sisters.



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