McEachern receiver Rahming gets most with diminutive frame
by Adam Carrington
acarrington@mdjonline.com
August 14, 2014 12:50 AM | 3219 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
T.J. Rahming may not have the size of a prototypical wide receiver, but that hasn’t stopped the McEachern senior. The 5-foot-9 Rahming came down with more than 1,000 receiving yards last season, gaining attention not only locally but in college recruiting circles.
<Br>Staff photo by Kelly J. Huff
T.J. Rahming may not have the size of a prototypical wide receiver, but that hasn’t stopped the McEachern senior. The 5-foot-9 Rahming came down with more than 1,000 receiving yards last season, gaining attention not only locally but in college recruiting circles.
Staff photo by Kelly J. Huff
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A lot is being expected from the McEachern wide receiver T.J. Rahming this season.

The 5-foot-9 Rahming certainly isn’t the tallest receiver, but he’s got the speed to make up for it.

The Duke-bound Rahming was one of Cobb County’s top receivers last season. He finished with 1,054 yards and 13 touchdowns on 54 catches, helping McEachern finish 11-3 with a trip to the Class AAAAAA state semifinals.

Rahming will be counted on to put up just as stellar numbers this season, with sophomore Bailey Hockman taking over the quarterbacking duties from the graduated Ty Clemons.

Hockman has earned recognition of his own, being named a preseason sophomore all-American by MaxPreps.

The adjustment from Clemons to Hockman shouldn’t be an issue for Rahming. They played together in three straight playoff games — all of them victories after Clemons was hurt in McEachern’s regular-season finale against Hillgrove.

One of Rahming’s biggest touchdowns of the season came with Hockman throwing the ball. In the state quarterfinal at Collins Hill, it was a 45-yard connection that came midway through the second quarter to give McEachern an 18-point lead before it held on for a 35-32 win.

Another Hockman-Rahming connection came late in the South Cobb game, when the pair connected on a 56-yard stroke to help the Indians win 40-0.

“He’s a great quarterback, and it didn’t take long for me to be comfortable,” Rahming said. “We put in the extra work at practice (last year) and during the weekends. Now, I’m comfortable.”

In all, he had three touchdown in the South Cobb, with two coming in the first quarter. He was also key in McEachern’s 42-13 win over Harrison, with 149 receiving yards.

Rahming said one of the advantages of being a shorter receiver is playing in the slot, where he can use his speed to outmaneuver linebackers and safeties once he catches the ball.

The disadvantage of being small is being tough enough to take the hits.

Rahming is expected to be stronger and faster as McEachern opens the season with a Corky Kell Classic game against North Gwinnett, the same team that beat the Indians in last year’s semifinal.

“I pretty much can do everything I did last year,” Rahming said. “I’ve worked on stuff like getting bigger and making the first man miss and turn a 5-yard gain into a 20-yard gain.”

When asked about his goals for the season, Rahming didn’t mention winning a state championship, cautioning that the Indians “need to win the first four games before getting into (Region 4AAAAAA) play, and to finish the season strong.”

After Rahming and the Indians host North Gwinnett, they will play at Buford, host Peachtree Ridge and go to Lovejoy before Marietta comes to Walter Cantrell Stadium to open region play.
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