‘I dreaded how he would look’
by Sarah Westwood and Haisten Willis
July 03, 2014 01:24 PM | 20929 views | 37 37 comments | 46 46 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A tear rolls down the cheek of Justin Ross Harris, the father of a toddler who died after police say he was left in a hot car for about seven hours, as he sits during his bond hearing in Cobb County Magistrate Court, Thursday in Marietta. Harris, who police say intentionally killed his toddler son by leaving the boy inside a hot SUV, was exchanging nude photos with women the day his son died and had looked at websites that advocated against having children, a detective testified Thursday. At that same hearing, a judge declined to grant bond for Harris, meaning he will remain in jail. Staff/Kelly J. Huff
A tear rolls down the cheek of Justin Ross Harris, the father of a toddler who died after police say he was left in a hot car for about seven hours, as he sits during his bond hearing in Cobb County Magistrate Court, Thursday in Marietta. Harris, who police say intentionally killed his toddler son by leaving the boy inside a hot SUV, was exchanging nude photos with women the day his son died and had looked at websites that advocated against having children, a detective testified Thursday. At that same hearing, a judge declined to grant bond for Harris, meaning he will remain in jail. Staff/Kelly J. Huff
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Cooper Harris
Cooper Harris
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Leanna Harris arrives to find a seat in a packed courtroom.
Leanna Harris arrives to find a seat in a packed courtroom.
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Cobb Police Detective Phil Stoddard examines a piece of evidence presented by the defense pertaining to cell phone messages.
Cobb Police Detective Phil Stoddard examines a piece of evidence presented by the defense pertaining to cell phone messages.
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Justin Ross Harris enters the courtroom.
Justin Ross Harris enters the courtroom.
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Justin Ross Harris stares in the direction of  Cobb County Assistant District Attorney Chuck Boring as he rises to leave the courtroom Thursday after Cobb County Chief Magistrate Judge Frank R. Cox ruled there was probable cause against Harris on charges of second-degree cruelty to a child and felony murder of their 22 month-old son Cooper. Staff/Kelly J. Huff
Justin Ross Harris stares in the direction of Cobb County Assistant District Attorney Chuck Boring as he rises to leave the courtroom Thursday after Cobb County Chief Magistrate Judge Frank R. Cox ruled there was probable cause against Harris on charges of second-degree cruelty to a child and felony murder of their 22 month-old son Cooper. Staff/Kelly J. Huff
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Justin Ross Harris sits motionless Thursday during his probable cause hearing before Chief Magistrate Judge Frank R. Cox. The judge ruled in favor of probable cause against Justin Ross Harris on charges of second-degree cruelty to a child and felony murder of their 22 month-old son Cooper. Staff/Kelly J. Huff
Justin Ross Harris sits motionless Thursday during his probable cause hearing before Chief Magistrate Judge Frank R. Cox. The judge ruled in favor of probable cause against Justin Ross Harris on charges of second-degree cruelty to a child and felony murder of their 22 month-old son Cooper. Staff/Kelly J. Huff
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Justin Ross Harris wipes away tears from his eye Thursday during his probable cause hearing before Chief Magistrate Judge Frank R. Cox. The judge ruled in favor of probable cause against Justin Ross Harris on charges of second-degree cruelty to a child and felony murder of their 22 month-old son Cooper. Staff/Kelly J. Huff
Justin Ross Harris wipes away tears from his eye Thursday during his probable cause hearing before Chief Magistrate Judge Frank R. Cox. The judge ruled in favor of probable cause against Justin Ross Harris on charges of second-degree cruelty to a child and felony murder of their 22 month-old son Cooper. Staff/Kelly J. Huff
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MARIETTA — Prosecutors revealed shocking details of the case they will present against Justin Ross Harris during a Thursday afternoon hearing in the Cobb County courthouse, saying Harris was sharing explicit photos of himself while his son was dying in a hot car.

Cobb Magistrate Judge Frank Cox denied Harris’ bond after three hours of statements from attorneys, witnesses and officers investigating the case.

Harris, 33, who was charged with murder after leaving his toddler in a hot car all day on June 18, will stay in jail for at least the next several months as his case goes to a grand jury. It could be nearly a year before the case goes to trial, according to Cobb District Attorney spokeswoman Kim Isaza. If the state seeks the death penalty, Isaza said it could take even longer before a trial begins.

Detective Phillip Stoddard took the stand at the hearing Thursday to reveal new details of the case that has garnered international attention since the unexplained death of 22-month-old Cooper Harris.

Stoddard was the only witness brought forth by the state, but he revealed a plethora of new information when questioned by Assistant District Attorney Chuck Boring.

Among the new revelations was the fact Harris had been carrying on multiple sexually-charged conversations — complete with the exchange of nude photographs — with women via instant messaging services throughout the day of his son’s death. At least one of the women was a minor, Stoddard said.

Harris’ attorney, Maddox Kilgore, objected six separate times to the line of questioning when Boring began asking about the women and sexually-charged conversations.

“That has nothing to do with anything,” Kilgore said.

After overruling the first several objections, Cox finally agreed Boring was “beating a dead horse.”

Stoddard also testified that Harris’ wife, Leanna, had acted strangely calm upon hearing of her son’s death.

When Leanna Harris arrived at Little Apron day care center to pick up Cooper after work that day and employees informed her that her child had never arrived, Stoddard said she immediately told them her husband had forgotten Cooper in the car. Though others in the room brought up alternate possibilities, Leanna Harris insisted the child must have been left in the car.

Stoddard said Leanna Harris was taken into police headquarters for questioning the same night, where she was briefly reunited with her husband in an interview room.

As Ross Harris broke down over what would happen to him and whether he would lose his job over the incident, Stoddard said she asked her husband, “Did you say too much?”

Three rows of the packed courtroom were filled by Ross Harris’ family, including his wife. Leanna Harris appeared to show little emotion during the hearing. Family members did not speak with the media before or after the hearing.



Timeline



Ross Harris had initially told police he simply forgot to drop Cooper off at day care before heading into work at the Home Depot corporate office that day.

Stoddard said Ross Harris had dropped off Cooper at day care six of the last nine work days, indicating it was part of his normal routine.

The two stopped for breakfast at a Chick-fil-A located less than a mile from where Ross Harris worked. Stoddard said surveillance video shows Cooper Harris was wide awake at the restaurant. Ross Harris backed his car into the spot that morning, which meant he would have turned around to see where he was going, Stoddard said.

Ross Harris told police after the incident he noticed Cooper while making a right turn near the Akers Mill shopping center. But Stoddard said Ross Harris would have made a similar right turn as he entered his workplace that morning.

Before heading to work, Stoddard said Harris backed his SUV into his parking spot, turning around to look in the process. Stoddard said the car seat would have been only six inches behind the vehicle’s front seat, and Cooper Harris was actually too tall for the seat’s regulations.

“The head was clearly visible,” Stoddard said.

Stoddard said Ross Harris returned to his car during lunch to drop off a box of light bulbs he purchased during his break. Stoddard added surveillance video from the office’s parking lot shows Harris stopped and turned back to watch as another individual walked by his car before he headed back inside for the rest of the day.

Early in the afternoon, Ross Harris received an email from Cooper’s teacher at the day care center, according to Stoddard.

Later, Harris was supposed to meet friends at the AMC Parkway Pointe movie theater on Highway 41. The group was going to see “22 Jump Street” at 5 p.m. Stoddard said Harris told friends at 3:45 that he would be late. Though Ross Harris was heading toward the theater when he pulled into the Akers Mill shopping center, he was less than a mile away when he entered the shopping complex at about 4:15. He also told detectives that night he had left early to avoid traffic.

Stoddard said witnesses described bizarre behavior at the scene after Harris stopped and placed his son on the hot pavement.

One told police Harris would yell “Oh my God!” one second, then his face would suddenly go blank.

When a witness began administering CPR to his son, Stoddard said Harris got on his phone. Records show he called his wife first, followed by the Little Apron day care. He did not call 911.

Police later asked Harris to stop talking on the phone, to which he replied, “f--- you,” Stoddard said.



June 18 interviews



Stoddard pointed out several details of Ross Harris’ interviews with police that night.

These included Harris talking at length about how much he knew about car seats and saying his child fell asleep between the drive from Chick-fil-A to the Home Depot. Stoddard said he’d driven the route at least 10 times and it takes between 30 and 40 seconds. In interviews, Stoddard said the day care employees reported Cooper usually arrived alert and happy in the mornings.

Ross Harris told detectives he always kissed his son when he put him in his car seat, just in case they died in an accident. Detectives, who watched from behind a one-way mirror, noticed Harris showed no emotion, according to Stoddard.

While Stoddard said he heard Harris tell his wife at police headquarters that Cooper looked “peaceful” when he died — after admitting to her that he “dreaded how he would look” — Stoddard said Cooper’s body was stiff and parts of his face “discolored” in a graphic description of what he said the body really looked like.

Stoddard said the medical examiner found scratches on Cooper’s face that happened recently enough to lack scabs at the time of his death as well as abrasions on the back of the child’s head.

He said Cooper’s death would have been painful.

Boring keyed in on the phrase “dreaded how he would look,” saying it shows Harris anticipated what he saw.

Leanna Harris also was interviewed that night. Stoddard said she too showed little emotion, but did say the situation was her “worst nightmare.” Police asked about her calm demeanor.

“Leanna responded, ‘I must have been in shock,” Stoddard said.

In Ross Harris’ interview, Stoddard said it was “all about him” as he made statements such as “I can’t believe this is happening to me” and spoke more about his job and the charges than the son he lost.

When police told Ross Harris he was being charged with murder, Stoddard said he responded with, “but there’s no malicious intent.”



An odor in the car



Stoddard said the Harris family had taken out two insurance policies on their son: a $2,000 policy through The Home Depot and a $25,000 policy dating back to November of 2012.

He said Harris recently visited a website he called “Child Free,” which described the benefits of not having children. He also sought out videos of people dying and performed searches about surviving in prison.

Harris had watched a video, made by a veterinarian, about dogs suffering in hot cars, twice, Stoddard said. He said the first time Harris saw the video was June 13, just five days before leaving his son to die in a sweltering car.

Boring asked Stoddard about any odors that were in the car. Stoddard said two of his detectives noticed a strong stench more than an hour after Harris pulled into the Akers Mill parking lot.

“It smelled like decomposition, or death,” Stoddard said.

Boring sought no bond on behalf of the state, saying Harris is a flight risk and a man with alternate personalities. Harris also has law enforcement experience. Harris was a dispatcher in Tuscaloosa at one time and his brother is a police sergeant.

Kilgore asked for $50,000 bond.

“Where could Harris go and not be recognized?” he asked Stoddard.

Kilgore said not every witness gave the same story, bringing a man named Leonard Madden to the stand ,who spoke about Harris’ emotional outbursts at the scene.

“I felt his pain,” Madden said. “I even wept.”

Harris’ vehicle has tinted windows, Kilgore said. He also said Harris bought light bulbs at The Home Depot while out at lunch. His friends drove him to his car afterward and saw him place the light bulbs in his car. None of them said they noticed unusual behavior.

Kilgore said Harris is completely deaf in his right ear. The family did not have debt collectors coming after them and police had no proof their bank accounts were overdrawn, according to Kilgore.

Harris texted his wife the question, “When are you going to get my buddy?” according to Kilgore, though Stoddard said that text couldn’t be found in phone records obtained by police.

A witness called by Kilgore named Alex Hall said he’s a close friend of Harris. The two attended the University of Alabama together and both worked at The Home Depot. Hall was part of the group going to see the movie June 18.

“He said he loved his son all the time,” Hall said.

As Hall spoke, Harris began to show emotion for the first time, more than an hour after the hearing began.

Kilgore said police had shown no evidence Harris left the child in the car on purpose.

“It’s not criminal negligence,” Kilgore said. “It’s a horrible, horrible accident.”

Kilgore argued there was not even enough evidence to support a misdemeanor, and pleaded with Cox to throw out the warrant.

He chided police and the media for “publicly shaming” Harris, saying “it’s not like his family hasn’t been through enough.”

Boring seemed put off by Kilgore’s statements.

“There’s a good bit of theater here,” he said.

Boring countered the evidence in the case is overwhelming and asked that a request for bond be declined.

Cox said probable cause is a “low threshold,” ruled there is enough probable cause for a trial to proceed and denied Harris’ bond.

Comments
(37)
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Tc&sg
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July 09, 2014
I am a parent commenting here.first of all if these to evil people did not want that precious little boy. There are many that couldn't have kids that would love to of had thistle precious little thing.but there is no excuse for leaving that child in that car..he knowledge he left that baby in the car.and the mom did to.the two showed no sympathy.and who would have such life policy on a baby.but either way.should not have to prove anything.proof is there u don't forget ur child is in a car.i think the both father and mother should be punished to the extent of the law and more..I call it pre meditated murder.knowing what u were going to do to ur child..
Mom comment
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July 07, 2014
This putting a child who has over grown the child in the car seat at the lowest level for a much smaller size is crazy. If you could only afford to buy one of the correct size car seats for now, then why wouldn't you have the car seat go with the child. This would be the best protection that the child does not get left with the car seat. The car seat goes with the child. My children went to another Bright Horizons corporate sponsored Daycare ( although I was a higher paying community member), I saw many car seats line the halls of the daycare. As one parent would drop the child off on their way to work and then another parent or babysitter would pick up the child . This way the car seat and child goes into daycare. Day cares have no problem with this.

Their was also no reason, that the Harris's could not afford to purchase a second front facing car seat. In the six weeks it had been since they had purchased the first one, Ross alone could have cut out his buying Chick fillet breakfest , daily through drive through claimed his lawyer and then going out to the Publix cafe lunch $5-6 . He could have eaten breakfest at home and packed lunch, skipped movies out with the buds from college ( much younger than him) He would have easily had the money to buy a second forward facing car seat. Then you can always ask Grandparents etc. for help with these purchases. They will buy it.

susansed
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July 06, 2014
Let me see...an almost two year old in the back seat of the car who just ate breakfast and is wide awake...do you think he was having any type of verbal interaction with his father while driving from the restaurant to the work parking lot....my little boys chatted most often when in the car...this is not a baby who has minimal verbal skills...this is a toddler who speaks...he forgot about his child and the restaurant was a skip from the work parking lot??? No tears in the courtroom from mother...for her lost child or husband...never deserved to be parents to that beautiful little boy!
East Cobber
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July 06, 2014


You're entitled to your opinion.

"Child did die of hyperthermia and no real evidence of physical abuse except for a few small scratches and bruises all children get at the victim’s age."

Fresh (unscabbed) scratches on Cooper's face and abrasions on the back of his head are evidence of his panic and struggle during the process of dying from hyperthermia. It is not a peaceful way to die, with his eyes open, mouth open and tongue sticking out (contrary to how Mr. Harris told his wife Cooper looked when he first took note of his son's corpse). Cooper died a torturous, slow and excruciating death being cooked in that oven of a car.

"Also, sounds like Mr. Harris is being prosecuted for certain risqué websites he accessed in addition to being accused of murder. At least the judge finally agreed that the naughty website thing was not relevant. To me bringing this up is evidence that the state hasn't got a solid case and was trying to appeal to prejudices concerning social sexual mores."

Two points: motive evidence, while not technically essential to prove the elements of murder, is helpful in determining guilt. A crime with no discernible motive is harder for average folks to understand. It helps fill in the puzzle pieces even though it isn't legally required to be provided to the jury or judge hearing the case. The sexting and adultery go to Mr. Harris's contempt for his married life and spouse, his boredom, his desire for extramarital relationships, his tendency to assume an alter ego, etc. That would certainly be one reason to dispose of a child: it frees you up to divorce your spouse without the 18 year burden of child support, and removes significant obligations of time, finance and attention from your life completely. Second point, to the degree Mr. Ross continues to protest he simply "forgot" his son in the car three different times, and perhaps blames such forgetfulness on stress, distraction, worries, etc., these activities, which seem to have taken up the bulk of Mr. Harris's workday, are not of the type that typically stressed and overworked parents suffer. Mr. Harris, in fact, worked less than 7 hours on the day he died. Significantly less if you subtract out the time it took him to kik, skout and take pictures of his private parts to send his internet girlfriends.

No million dollar life insurance policy taken out so no real monetary incentive to commit murder.

Hmmm. Perhaps not everybody places such a high value on life as you do. For a guy who was in credit card debt of $4k and earned roughly $60k per year, had student loans and car debt to pay, $25k is a nice chunk of change. Plus, no taxes!

"Mr. Harris acted normally at work that day and he was well liked and was not a loner."

Meaningless. Do killers have the word "murderer" tattooed on their foreheads at birth? Evil lurks amongst us, and perhaps the scariest aspect of that is that it frequently looks, sounds and acts benign. Until it isn't. In fact, one hallmark of sociopathy (having, among other things, no conscience) is that they are considered witty, charming and socially adept. The truth is that they use imitation of others to hide the hollow of their souls.

"This case in my opinion doesn't pass the smell test that would indicate that Mr. Harris committed murder. Either way guilty or innocent Mr. Harris's life is ruined."

Take a whiff of the SUV in which Cooper died. Does that pass your smell test? Because the LEOs who entered or examined the vehicles, even hours after Cooper's body was removed, smelled decomposition, which is unmistakable, unforgettable, and begins just after the moment of death. In a sealed, hot car, in combination with the smell of a dirty diaper and perhaps vomit, it would have been, and surely was, a powerful indicator to Mr. Harris that something very wrong was happening in the back seat of that car. Yet, he chose to ignore it for 7 minutes while he drove to Akers Mill.

"This accident could happen to anyone with a small child that has to be according to state law be in a child restraint seat."

No, it only happens to people whose top priorities are not their children. It isn't always intentional, but it's always negligent. Parents owe a duty of care to their children to not place them in unsafe situations where likelihood of injury or death is unreasonably high. If a child is placed in a carseat in a hot car and left there, even "accidentally" that duty has been breached. Should it always be criminal? That's a debate for another day.

"Also the seat was facing to the rear making the child not easily visible from the front. Here is an interesting fact from the website the Harris's may have accessed concerning child death by heat stroke at http://ggweather.com/heat/ "In the most recent three-year period of 2011-2013, when almost all young children are now placed in back seats instead of front seats, there have been at least 109 known fatalities from heatstroke...a ten-fold increase from the rate of the early 1990s." If Mr. Harris did intentionally kill his son he has to be one of the most cold blooded murderers in history evidenced by his actions that day like going back to his car at lunch time to leave some light bulbs or he is being railroaded for political gain. I hope we don't have another Nifong in the D.A.'s office."

Cooper had outgrown the carseat, and his head came up over the top of the seat, which was mere inches from Ross's face when he was driving.

He would have noticed this everytime he turned to look in his blind spot or out the rear window (to back up into the parking space).

I support Vic Reynolds and his staff, applaud Cobb PD for their hard work on this case to date, and sincerely hope justice (and belief that) will be served for little Cooper, who was completely innocent and clearly betrayed by the two people who were supposed to protect him.

Honest Abe
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July 04, 2014


Sounds like the state is trying to pound a large square peg into a small round hole.

Child did die of hyperthermia and no real evidence of physical abuse except for a few small scratches and bruises all children get at the victim’s age.

Also, sounds like Mr. Harris is being prosecuted for certain risqué websites he accessed in addition to being accused of murder. At least the judge finally agreed that the naughty website thing was not relevant. To me bringing this up is evidence that the state hasn't got a solid case and was trying to appeal to prejudices concerning social sexual mores.

No million dollar life insurance policy taken out so no real monetary incentive to commit murder.

Mr. Harris acted normally at work that day and he was well liked and was not a loner.

This case in my opinion doesn't pass the smell test that would indicate that Mr. Harris committed murder. Either way guilty or innocent Mr. Harris's life is ruined. This accident could happen to anyone with a small child that has to be according to state law be in a child restraint seat. Also the seat was facing to the rear making the child not easily visible from the front. Here is an interesting fact from the website the Harris's may have accessed concerning child death by heat stroke at http://ggweather.com/heat/ "In the most recent three-year period of 2011-2013, when almost all young children are now placed in back seats instead of front seats, there have been at least 109 known fatalities from heatstroke...a ten-fold increase from the rate of the early 1990s." If Mr. Harris did intentionally kill his son he has to be one of the most cold blooded murderers in history evidenced by his actions that day like going back to his car at lunch time to leave some light bulbs or he is being railroaded for political gain. I hope we don't have another Nifong in the D.A.'s office.

anonymous
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July 05, 2014
Well said, Abe.
anonymous
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July 06, 2014
Honest Abe. Scholar, please explain how the father and child were VIDEOTAPED at a restaurant less than a half mile away from where the father parked his car to go to work, less than a minute drive, yet the father forgot his child was in the car after strapping him in his car seat less than a minute before. Father is VIDEOTAPED at noon going to his car and father again forgot again his child was in the car. Father leaves work and forgets AGAIN his child was in the car. This is three times father "forgets" his child is in the car. Once, going to work; twice, at lunch; and three times, when leaving work. Thanks for clarifying this for all of us, Honest Abe.
anonymous
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July 06, 2014
And you said it all here, Honest Abe, with your quote, "Mr. Harris acted normally at work that day." Well, I don't know about you, Honest Abe, but I for one could not be performing my job and "sexting" all at the same time while acting normally.
Stupidity
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July 04, 2014
If it was intentional, he should have known that his actions that day would be under a microscope... yet he did everything wrong.

He is either Innocent or really Stupid.

I lean toward the latter.

bimeler
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July 09, 2014
I agree!

CobbCountyNative
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July 04, 2014
The evidence of this being planned is overwhelming, he had 30 seconds to turn right to Home Depot or left to go to Day Care, they changed front facing car seats to rear facing car seats 2 weeks prior, the research on dying in cars, being child free, going to car during lunch to place light bulbs, all contrived. I applaud Cobb County for keeping the developments of this case and doing their job. He is a Narcissistic person that only thinks of himself!!!
kdkddk
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July 04, 2014
Put me on the jury! This is a NO BRAINER... cant wait to see the mom charged also!
bimeler
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July 08, 2014
Me too she is. Not innocent either!!

MAY-RETTA SURVIVOR
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July 04, 2014
These 2 are EVIL PERSONIFIED.
mdx9668
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July 04, 2014
Leanna Harris has that 'Susan Smith' look about her. I think she was a knowing accomplice in Cooper's death.
anonhjkhlkghgjg
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July 03, 2014
So why was this man denied bond? Was he a flight risk? no. Was he likely to commit another felony? no. Was there a significant risk of him failing to appear when required to do so? no. Was he a danger to anyone or any property upon release? No. Was there a risk of him interfering with witnesses or obstructing justice? No.

Regardless as to if Mr Harris is guilty or not, by statute he deserves a bond. Judge Cox ought to know better, shame on him.
Mom comment
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July 04, 2014
The judge stated why he would not give a bond, this may become a death penalty case. The judge found they met the probable cause just with the short time it took to drive from Chick fillet to the daycare or his office. Then second that he drove around with a child in rigermortise , that clearly smelled of death the entire five minutes before he choose to stop.
Rusmoking Crack
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July 04, 2014
@anonhjkhlkghgig- really are you willing to ask these questions, if so see the name..
anonymous
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July 04, 2014
I am with anonhjkhlkghgjg.

When the state brought in sexting messages that have nothing to do with this matter, I knew that they were working hard to distract folks from something else...likely the holes in their case.

Watch out you sexting type folks. Cobb PD thinks that is a sign of a killer.

Finally, the detective had obviously spent a lot of time with the sexting photos. Yet, he had not had time to go thru all of the text messages from that day...namely the one Harris sent to his wife asking when she was going to pick up his buddy. Sounds like a detective may like "neekid pitchers" a little more than doing a through job.

anonhjkhlkghgjg
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July 04, 2014
Most cases meet probably cause, and most grand juries will indict a ham sandwhich, the statutes are there so a person can be able to have a fair trial providing these criteria are met. A person has a presumption of innocence, and when these conditions are met are entitled to a bond to help defeat the indictment charged against them.

@mom comment, if he didn't see the kid it didn't matter if the kid was in rigormortis or not-but if he was the kid was in rigormortis he would have been still and silent. A 5 minute drive I think would be a convenient estimate for a small period, which is probably hyperboleated by the police which is common. Secondly, we don't know how strong the stench of death was or even if they was a smell of death given this short period of time, and again police in general are known to hyperbolate and make up details to try to justify their questionable actions. Usually upon death a person void their bowels which is fairly common knowledge, and if there was an odor at this point it probably would have been similar to a messy diaper...Which it is possible the car already smelled like.
Flight risk
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July 04, 2014
At this point, Mr. Harris recognizes that he will be going to prison. That makes him a flight risk!
brw735
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July 03, 2014
Yes - abrasions on the back of his head from writhing around in his car seat and scratches to his face from his own desperation... When I first heard this story I felt so sorry for the parents. I have three children and I do believe that from time to time these incidents happen to loving parents purely through human error. I could only imagine the torment a loving parent would endure knowing their negligence has cost their child his life. But this?! This is a disgrace and kudos to our Cobb police for smelling a rat from the first moments.
Kael
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July 04, 2014
You believe from time to time this things do in fact happen?

ARe you as moronic as you sound? I'm a parent and regardless of how tired I may be, I have NEVER forgotten that my precious children were in the car, EVER.
Jose from Marietta
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July 03, 2014
In my opinion this lady knew that her son was going to be murdered that day by her husband, she agree,they don't love their child,this is double conspiracy,no emotion,no pain,they want to get rid of the baby,why they don't guive him for adoption in their church,are this people Christians??Cobb Police should take a second look at her.
Clemente
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July 04, 2014
This lady is definitely guilty, but to the extent of which we won't know until further investigation is done. She may be able to excuse the first two points I will bring up, but let's see how she can address the many points I bring up collectively

1) no emotion about kid's death. OK, people react differently. But then why doesn't it occur to her when the Day Care people said her son didn't arrive that day and with her admitted guess that her husband left the kid in the car, why was there no reaction from her to immediately call the husband to see if she can allay her worst fears and see if her son is still alive?

2) While her internet search about hot cars may not be enough in a court, it does beg the explanation why if she had such a fear of her husband leaving the kid in the car, why wouldn't she call her husband casually every day to make sure he didn't forget.

3) If she was truly betrayed by her husband's double life and the damning facts about the way her husband had to know he left the kid in the car at some point that morning, why is there not even any kind of reaction showing surprise, shock, anger or confusion. Just something about what she was hearing in court. Or maybe she just knew all along?

4) So what can she be guilty of? It could be something they discussed, but she had no idea when he would actually carry it out, if he ever did and her reaction at the day care was the realization that it actually happened and she genuinely was numb in sadness about her being part of something she realized felt worse than she planned on it being. Or that she had a hunch and she never acted on it by checking up on the hubby. Or is it possible that her husband is good at preying on vulnerable youngsters judging by his sexting pattern and targets and that he chose his wife(not underage in this case) because she is a weak minded follower and that he convinced this moron that this is the way to go.
rhal
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July 04, 2014
They were doing this for money, please read the full transcripts before commenting with your nonsensical rhetoric.
Cobbresident
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July 03, 2014
I am proud to be a Cobb County resident and have faith that the judge and jury will convict this monster to the fullest. I hated how the defense tried to downplay his "sexting" and that too with minors-all during work and during the day he plotted to kill his little baby. That is very relevant to his horrible character and his low life. It brought tears to my eyes when I heard how the detective described the baby's suffering. What an absolute monster. Times like this I wish we still did public stoning.
Mom comment
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July 04, 2014
I am sure that the Home Depot HR department had someone deliver his termination letter to the Cobb County Jail and to his Attorney's office. On National News sites HD is being ripped big time for not catching an employees exiting on the job this much. People are asking is that the environment?.

My guess is by 2:30, the HR department had that letter in process and had grounds for termination.
Just Wait
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July 03, 2014
Maybe from now on, the public will give the police the benefit of the doubt before they beat them up. So many people demeaned the Cobb Police for charging this father because they all knew it was just a tragic accident. Well, our police department works on just the facts. Thankfully.
PeeWeesBrother
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July 04, 2014
I always thought the benefit of a doubt automatically went to the accused not the police? Innocent until proven guilty? Also, when did accessing naughty sex oriented websites become evidence that one may have committed murder? At least the judge threw out that load of junk evidence as not relevant.
Mike In Smyrna
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July 03, 2014
The Cobb County Police Force are an exceptional team.
mom comment
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July 03, 2014
I give the Cobb County Detectives until Monday to call Leanna back in for more questioning. Her mother who already ripped her for not being emotional enough and hating her husband day one. Is going to rip her a new one, after hearing the testimony of him being a child perv. on the internet, sending child porn to 16/17 year old.

If she does not agree to cooperate and sing on her husband by then, I suspect they will file Conspiracy to commit murder and child abuse charges on this pathetic woman.

That poor church lady looked like she was about to vomit on the stand as she got told about his looking up porn on the web, while the kid was baking in the car. His 1/2 brother cop said it all with his tears as he left the stand after the DA told him too, about the child porn. He was shaking his head crying.
Not Convinced
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July 03, 2014
Looking up porn does not equal murder or half the male population would be charged. And now it seems the lunchtime car trip was just opening the door and throwing something in, not like he was checking to see if the boy was dead. I still am not convinced this was intentional but here in the South you are generally guilty if the police say so given the low education, conservative ignorance and hate (look up Leo Frank),and no police oversight. Time will tell if this guy is being railroaded or is the evil person the prosecution is trying to make him out to be.
Mom comment
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July 04, 2014
Setting and receiving pornography, from any minor is against the law. Even when teenagers send it amongst themselves.

Teenage boys get arrested for sending shots of their weenies to teenage girls. One at my daughter's Cobb County high school got 3 charges. Are you going to say he only got charged because he was black and white guys don't get charged.

A 33 year old sending photos of there weenies to minors is even creepier. They should know better and have more control. When are men going to get it woman aren't really turned on by groin shots, we like hairless backs and hairless six pack chests. This guy is so ugly inside and out he is unattractive to mature women.
anonymous
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July 04, 2014
Hey Not Convinced, you are correct about how promptly folks are willing to take the word of the cops in Cobb County. I think this has a lot to do with the large number of older (greater than 65) folks who live here and the era they come from --- which pretty taught all of us kids that "The policeman is your friend. He is here to help you! He would never lie!"

Combined with the fact that most of these older folks do not really access the internet and read/view not much more than CNN, the MDJ or ABC, CBS or FoxNews, and you have a population that almost believes that it is a patriotic duty to fawn over law enforcement. This, even as the popularity of iPhones has revealed ( via You Tube and the online media) the real life activity of far too many police officers who are engaging in blatant criminal and abusive behavior exacted on every day innocent citizens( An "epidemic of isolated incidents", some have called it..

For those of us younger than 60, we grew up in a world were, as young people - despite what we had been taught-- we saw how law enforcement actually operated ...and, too many of them just did not ever act like "friends" or honest people when they were around us kids.

That said, when you reference an ugly case from 100 years ago to make your point,...you DO lose me.
Pot Meet Kettle
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July 04, 2014
Awfully bold of you to degrade an entire region of the country for being dumb and uneducated while posting under the username of "Notconvinced".

If you aren't convinced after hearing that testimony and evidence there is really no helping you. I'm just glad I didn't receive your superior level of education.

Some people...
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