Reeves ousts Gregory from House
by Haisten Willis
May 21, 2014 03:13 AM | 4438 views | 2 2 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bert Reeves hugs his girlfriend, Amy Owen, during election night at dk Gallery. Reeves ousted incumbent Charles Gregory by 4 percentage points. ‘Tonight, we are focused on celebrating this victory,’ Reeves said. ‘I’m humbled by the victory and the support of the community.’<br>Staff/Katherine Frye
Bert Reeves hugs his girlfriend, Amy Owen, during election night at dk Gallery. Reeves ousted incumbent Charles Gregory by 4 percentage points. ‘Tonight, we are focused on celebrating this victory,’ Reeves said. ‘I’m humbled by the victory and the support of the community.’
Staff/Katherine Frye
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MARIETTA— State Rep. Charles Gregory (R-Kennesaw) was ousted by challenger Bert Reeves, a Marietta attorney, during Tuesday’s Republican primary.

Of the 30,662 registered voters in Georgia House District 34, 5,375 voters or 18 percent turned out in the primary. The district includes portions of Marietta and Kennesaw.

The earliest returns showed the two in a dead heat, but as more votes came in, Reeves took the lead. In the end, he took 2,659 votes, or 52 percent, to Gregory’s 2,414 votes, or 48 percent.

Reeves and his supporters gathered at dk Gallery on the Marietta Square.

“Tonight, we are focused on celebrating this victory,” he said. “I’m humbled by the victory and the support of the community.”

Former Georgia Republican Party Chairman Chuck Clay outlined the differences between the two.

“Gregory very proudly says we need to ... do more with less and that he’s proud he’s not going to be the guy putting a deal together,” Clay said. “Reeves is more saying if Marietta and Kennesaw want a strong voice in the state legislature, vote for me.

An example of the differences between the two is their responses when asked about the Atlanta Braves move to Cobb County during a May 11 debate.

Gregory said in a free market, everyone votes on whether a product or service is useful every time they make a purchase.

“So what I would say to the Atlanta Braves is, ‘We would love to have you. You, just like any other business, you take out your loan. You build your stadium. You buy your land. You make your investment. You take the risk, and you keep all the profits,’” Gregory said. “We don’t need to be putting or socializing the risk on the backs of taxpayers. It really is legal plunder, corporate welfare, corporatism, whatever you want to call it. The taxpayers don’t need to fund private business.”

Gregory said he would love to have a water park in his backyard, but understands the government is not going to give him the money to build one.

Reeves answered the question differently.

“One of the key differences between Mr. Gregory and myself is his absolute point of view about the complete exclusion of government involved in private enterprise,” Reeves said. “He and I disagree, and I believe there are certain partnerships that certainly provide economic growth and jobs, and that’s what I’m all about.”

Clay said a lower turnout would be to Gregory’s advantage, while a higher turnout would benefit Reeves. In the end, he gave a slight edge to Reeves.

“If I have to pick an upset, I think this would be the race,” he said.

In total, Reeves raised $50,585 for his campaign, while Gregory raised a total of $35,344.

Comments
(2)
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Just Wait
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May 21, 2014
Sanity returns. Aah!
Sanity NO
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May 21, 2014
Sanity = Heck YES! You can count on Cobb taxpayers footing the bill for MORE crony owned projects and wasteful spending!
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