War being remembered, not ‘celebrated’
May 16, 2014 12:00 AM | 1462 views | 9 9 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print
DEAR EDITOR:

Re: Maria Acevedo Letter, “Why celebrate Civil War, slavery?” Tuesday’s MDJ

I am hoping this letter may help clarify a misconception, such as the one noted by Ms. Acevedo. The Civil War and slavery are indeed nothing to celebrate. The 150th anniversary of Kennesaw Mountain is a commemoration rather than a celebration, and there is a difference. This anniversary is to honor the sacrifices made during this very important part of our nation’s history and it just so happens that one of the most important battles of that war was fought right here on our soil.

I have lived in Marietta my entire life and have yet to run across anyone who was pro-slavery. It was a part of history, both in the North and the South, but I think all would agree in this day and time, it was an abomination and our way of life now would not conceive of such a thing.

We would not protest a commemoration of those who lost their lives on 9/11 or in the Holocaust. History is history and should be recognized as such or else these events slip into obscurity as we live our day to day lives.

Jim Glover

Marietta

Comments
(9)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
anonymous
|
May 16, 2014
Sorry Honest Abe, please read a book. Alexander Stephens, Vice President of the Confederacy, said slavery was the "cornerstone of the Confederacy" and the institution was enshrined in the Confederate Constitution. The South knew that with the expanding territories in the west becoming free states that their immoral, peculiar institution would soon be abolished. The only way for the South to preserve it's economy based on labor intensive cotton production was to withdraw from the union. The Real "Honest Abe" however had different ideas. Your comments on voting and skin color are rather sad and un-American and will always put you on the wrong side of history.
anonymous
|
May 16, 2014
If you have never run across anyone who was pro-slavery you should attend the next Republican Party Meeting!
Ben Twomey
|
May 22, 2014
@anonymous. that is a bald faced lie. Teh Republican Party is nor pro-slavery and you well know it.

If you want to truly find por-slavery advocates, look at the liberals in the government. The more people are made dependent on the government, the more theya re enslaved.

We are heading toward the big Federal Plantation with B.O. as "Massah".
anonymous
|
May 24, 2014
Here it is, right here. Maria writes a letter, stirs up the immigrant/democratic base, angers them and then tries to make it all about the Republican party. Wow.
Samuel Adams
|
May 24, 2014
Anyone who knows about the history of our country realizes that Abraham Lincoln, signer of the Emancipation Proclamation, was a Republican and it was the Democrats who wanted to continue slavery. As late as 1964, it was Congressional Democrats who opposed the Civil Rights Act and it was Democrats in today's senate who were members of the KKK. But they get a pass. And idiots like this say it was Republicans.
lady uninformed
|
May 16, 2014
I think the lady is uninformed, ignorant of the facts and should probably either refrain from showing this, or else really do some research into the our history. Life is too short for someone to be upset about something they know little about.
Honest Abe
|
May 16, 2014
Slavery was the least of the causes of the South's desire to become a separate nation state. One of the central causes of the desire of session was that the population of the north was growing much faster than the south. The south was going to be made politically no longer relevant due to the expanding voting strength of the faster growing north.

In other words, like today some vulgar people take great joy in the changing demographics of the US, changing from a white country to one of a non white controlled nation due to their greater voting block strength.

Forget the past and one is condemned to repeat it.

just sayin
|
May 16, 2014
Sorry Honest Abe, please read a book, Alexander Stephens himself, the Vice President of the Confederacy, said that slavery was the "cornerstone" of the Confederacy and the institution was enshrined in the Confederate Constitution. The South knew that with the expanding territories becoming states the South would soon be outvoted in Congress and their immoral, peculiar institution made illegal.

The only way to save their investment and cotton economy was to withdraw from the union. The "real Honest Abe" however had different ideas and fought to preserve the union. Your revisionist nonsense is however entertaining.
East Cobb Senior
|
May 16, 2014
@Honest Abe: I have to beg he differ with you relative to major causes of the South's desire to become a separate nation. Major discussions had been underway for a number of years about the abolishment of slavery and the economic impact it would have on the south's cash crop cotton. Although the south may have been losing some political influence through representation in the Congress they still had sway in the Senate to block legislation that would have negatively impacted the financial health of the south through abolishing slavery and the subsequent higher labor costs to produce cotton. States Rights and their ability to retain slavery was the major factor contributing to the War Between the States.
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, and spam will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides