Honoring history: Groups remember ancestors at Confederate Cemetery
by Nikki Wiley
April 28, 2014 04:00 AM | 3419 views | 8 8 comments | 32 32 recommendations | email to a friend | print
James Tolbert, right, loads a charge into The Preacher, a Civil War-era cannon, as former Marietta resident David Sapp waits to fire the weapon on Confederate Memorial Day on Sunday at the Confederate Cemetery in Marietta. <br> Staff/Jeff Stanton
James Tolbert, right, loads a charge into The Preacher, a Civil War-era cannon, as former Marietta resident David Sapp waits to fire the weapon on Confederate Memorial Day on Sunday at the Confederate Cemetery in Marietta.
Staff/Jeff Stanton
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Several members of Kennesaw Chapter 241 of the Daughters of the Confederacy gather together as member Lynda Jeune Wilson, far left, fans herself to stay cool while wearing her period apparel for the event.
Several members of Kennesaw Chapter 241 of the Daughters of the Confederacy gather together as member Lynda Jeune Wilson, far left, fans herself to stay cool while wearing her period apparel for the event.
slideshow
MARIETTA — Beneath large shade trees and in the midst of thousands of Confederate flags perched near tombstones Sunday, the Daughters of Confederate Veterans on Confederate Memorial Day honored their ancestors who died in the Civil War.

Some attendees donned period garb, wearing hoop skirts and outfits reminiscent of Confederate soldiers. Others said they just wanted to remember the soldiers who died in the bloodiest battle to take place on American soil.

Maryanne McCurdy, president of the Kennesaw Chapter 241 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, which hosted the event, said it’s important to take the time to reflect on history. 

“We are honoring our ancestors,” McCurdy said. “It’s not about fighting the war again. We are honoring people who laid down their life for what they believed in.”

Richard Boarts agrees. He traveled from Haralson County, near the Alabama border, with his fellow members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans to participate in the ceremony.

He played taps at the cemetery after muskets and a cannon were fired.

Setting aside a day to remember lives lost in the Civil War is just as important, Boarts said, as reflecting on the casualties of other battles.

“Why do we honor Georgia Washington? Why do we honor World War II soldiers? The same reason. Identical,” Boarts said.

Marietta is deep in Civil War history, said Brad Quinlan, a local historian, who spoke at the Sunday ceremony.

“Here in Marietta 150 years ago, it was the second largest hospital site,” Quinlan said.

All 15,000 hospital beds throughout Marietta were full, Quinlan said, and sights of dying soldiers with wounds wrapped in bed sheets were all too common.

He quoted letters written by Marietta residents who described images of soldiers lying on blood soaked stretchers outside the Kennesaw House and in open fields across the city.

About 3,000 soldiers are buried in the Marietta Confederate Cemetery, which is the largest Confederate cemetery south of Richmond, Va.

Confederate Memorial Day has been a legal holiday in Georgia since 1874, and the members of the Ladies Memorial Association, United Daughters of the Confederacy and Sons of Confederate Veterans have kept the tradition alive.

In 2009, Georgia permanently designated April as Confederate History and Heritage Month.

Comments
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not even close
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April 28, 2014
Ben, I am not your son and would prefer to be called sir by you. So you equate civil rights and the defending of slavery in the same sentence and you call me dense and foolish? Please if you are trying to represent the Confederacy don't show your ignorance and try make it seem that slavery was not the issue. We all know better.
C.W. Roden
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April 29, 2014
Frankly I think what you don't know would fill a library little nobody.

Honoring dead American Veterans - and Confederate soldiers ARE recognized as such - and taking pride in being their descendants is not the same thing as condoning either the War itself or the Confederate government.

The men were fighting to defend their homes and families first and foremost. Their government was often secondary of third in their thoughts. If the invading armies had been wearing Union blue, British red or even other men in Confederate gray and butternut they would have fought and been right to do so.

It is that devotion to home and the land of their birth that we honor before all else.
MAY-RETA SURVIVOR
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April 30, 2014
@"not even close"; Such Slum Prudery from the likes of someone (namely you!) who feels comfortable calling those, with whom they disagree, "TRAITORS".

My suggestion to you, Sir (?), is that if you wish respect from others, then you must also demonstrate it.
not even close
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April 28, 2014
"Why do we honor Georgia Washington? Why do we honor World War II soldiers? The same reason. Identical,” Boarts said." No its not the same, teh confederates were TRAITORS! Those who celebrate their heratige I can understand, those who celebrate what was happening in the South at that time are evil.

Ben Twomey
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April 28, 2014
Son, you need to study history a little more,than you will not appear quite so dense or foolish.

To say that the Confederates were traitors is like saying all those who who defied the law to in the cause of gaining civil rights were traitors.

Both the followers of MLK and the followers of Jefferson Davis were engaging in civil disobedience in order to right what they saw as wrong. The Confederacy was more adamant and violent than the civil rights activists were required to be. However, that is not to say that the civil rights activists did not engage some ultra violent activities too.
MAY-RETTA SURVIVOR
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April 28, 2014
@"not even close": I was wondering just how long before a bigot-baiting "PC" termite like you would come out of the woodwork!

Trust me, your online "not even close" moniker says it all.
Southern Patriot
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April 29, 2014
"God Save the South" from ignorant fools like you!
Confederate Mike
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April 29, 2014
Once again, Confederate Soldiers are forever set in Stone as American Soldiers. They deserve and have been recognized by The Federal Government as heroes who have done what was necessary. To the misguided and ill-informed, please remember that no matter how you slice it or dice it Folks, The Yanks were the Invaders and The Confederates were The Defenders. If one were to leave an abusive relationship, where one side takes advantage of the other, while trampling on their States and dismissing the Original American Constitution, would you not agree that leaving peacefully was the only possible outcome ? And yes, they seceded peacefully... Lincoln needed to aggravate and instigate a conflict, Fort Sumter, in order to pursue his agenda of taking the South by force. Otherwise, he wouldn’t have had a leg to stand on. I guess your kind also classifies Washington and Jefferson as traitors ? As they too have rebelled and stood up for their beliefs...Hence why you don't live in British North America, Canada, today !

Please educate yourselves prior to making nasty accusation and allegations.

As long as Folks like myself keep roaming this planet, the name of the brave and gallant Confederate Soldier will always be honored, respected, commemorated and paid homage to.

Wishing all a Wonderful Dixie Day !

Deo Vindice, Confederate Mike.

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