2 charged in kidnapping of North Carolina prosecutor's father
by Michael Biesecker, Associated Press
April 16, 2014 01:00 PM | 965 views | 1 1 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Two more people were charged Wednesday in the kidnapping of a North Carolina prosecutor's father, bringing the number to at least eight people who authorities say were involved in the elaborate plot.

Federal authorities filed kidnapping charges against Jakym Tibbs and a man listed as John Doe, known by the street name "Kirkwood Quan." Kirkwood is a neighborhood in East Atlanta. Officials declined to say whether the two men are in custody or release any information about their whereabouts.

Six other people were accused last week in the scheme following a late-night raid by the FBI on an Atlanta apartment. Rescued was Frank Arthur Janssen, 63, a Wake Forest man whose daughter is an assistant district attorney in Wake County.

Authorities said the kidnappers made demands for the benefit of Kelvin Melton, an inmate serving a life sentence in a North Carolina prison for a 2011 shooting. The victim's daughter, Colleen Janssen, prosecuted Melton, 49.

Also known as "Dizzy" and "Old Man," Melton had a mobile phone in his cell at Polk Correctional Institution in Butner, exchanging at least 123 calls and text messages with the alleged kidnappers, according to the FBI. Authorities closed in on the suspects by tracking their mobile phones and listening to their calls.

"My office will continue to pursue everyone involved with this crime," said Thomas G. Walker, the U.S. attorney in Raleigh. "This deliberate attack on our judicial system cannot be tolerated."

Frank Janssen was kidnapped April 5 from his home and driven to Atlanta, where he was held for five days before his rescue. The kidnappers sent Janssen's wife photos of him tied to a chair with text messages threatening to cut him into pieces if their demands weren't met. Authorities have not said specifically what the demands were.

According to testimony from his 2012 trial, Melton is a high-ranking member of the Bloods street gang from New York City who ordered a 19-year-old subordinate to travel to Raleigh and kill his ex-girlfriend's new boyfriend.

Court records show Melton has a long record of felony convictions in New York, the first being a 1979 robbery committed when he was 14. He pleaded guilty to manslaughter and robbery in 1998 and served more than 13 years in New York prisons before being released in August 2011.

Melton was arrested in the shooting in Raleigh the following month. It is not clear from the court record why Melton came to the South, but he was supposed to be serving parole in New York through 2015.

According to court filings, the FBI monitored a phone call made by Melton from his prison cell to an Atlanta number associated with the kidnappers during which two male voices discussed how to kill Janssen and dispose of his body.

Following the call, authorities tried to enter Melton's cell and he smashed the phone. A few hours later, they located Janssen in Atlanta.

When making the arrests, authorities also recovered a .45-caliber handgun, picks and a shovel, according to the FBI.

Melton faces a federal kidnapping charge, along with five people from the Atlanta metro area who were denied bond at a court hearing Tuesday.

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Follow Biesecker at Twitter.com/mbieseck



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Comments
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monsters among us
|
April 17, 2014
What a bunch of monsters! Hope they spend the rest of their lives in prison. Its frightening, to say the least, to think that people like this occupy the same space as the rest of us.
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