Special needs kids learn to thrive at MDE school
by Hannah Morgan
January 14, 2014 10:30 PM | 1809 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bella and Sarah play at the MDE school. The school is having an open house on Jan. 21 at 7 p.m. for parents with special needs students to learn more about the facility. The school is so popular that it relocated to a larger building in east Cobb in October, where students have more space to learn. Spread over two floors, the school has a brand-new gym, classrooms and upgraded resources.
Bella and Sarah play at the MDE school. The school is having an open house on Jan. 21 at 7 p.m. for parents with special needs students to learn more about the facility. The school is so popular that it relocated to a larger building in east Cobb in October, where students have more space to learn. Spread over two floors, the school has a brand-new gym, classrooms and upgraded resources.
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MARIETTA — Mindy Elkan has a passion for working with special needs students.

She opened the MDE school in 2009 to teach special needs children in Cobb how to thrive in school.

Her school was so popular that it relocated to a larger building in east Cobb in October, where students have more space to learn. Spread over two floors, the school has a brand-new gym, classrooms and upgraded resources.

The school is having an open house on Jan. 21 at 7 p.m. for parents with special needs students to learn more about the facility.

MDE is named after Marc David Elkan, who died suddenly from a heart attack six years ago. Since then, Mindy Elkan has run the school in his memory and built the school up from just three students in 2009 to almost 30 students enrolled as of this month, she said.

The brand new facility in east Cobb can accommodate up to 60 students, but Elkan will not grow the school more than that. She believes in a small student-to-teacher ratio, as it is now 4 to 1 at the school.

The school’s curriculum is unique, and focuses not only on education but also life skills. Classes teach students how to shop at the grocery store, as well as other skills. This is part of a well-rounded curriculum Elkan believes is crucial to children’s development.

“I have the most amazing staff you can imagine … we have unique specials, field trips, and we try to expose children to many different things,” she said.

The event on Jan. 21 will feature a question-and-answer session and introduce parents to the school’s curriculum.

After the introduction, parents will be invited to a special needs resource fair, where there will be representatives of companies that serve the special needs community present to answer questions about behavior skills and teaching resources, Elkan said.

“We want to serve these children as best we can in a smaller environment,” she added, “Our school is a language and communication-based school.”

The MDE school is accredited by the Georgia Accrediting Commission to teach special needs children in grades K-8, and the school also offers a vocational rehab Certificate of Completion for grades 9-12, Elkan said.

For more information on tuition, and on the MDE school, visit mdeschool.com.

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