The past unearthed - Temporary exhibit displays artifacts from 80 years of archaeological studies
by Rebecca Johnston
January 12, 2014 12:05 AM | 1303 views | 1 1 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The pot on the left is a reconstructed pot found on the Etowah River north of Canton. It is a deep conoidal jar with an eccentric rim, applied knobs just below the neck and applied decoration at the rim. The larger stone bowl is a soapstone bowl found on Little River; soapstone was used for bowls because it retains heat well. It is most likely from the Archaic Period, probably 1600-1000 B.C. The object in front is a ceremonial celt from Wilbanks Mound. It is from the Mississippian Period, most likely 1250-1375. (Photos courtesy of Lisa Tressler)
The pot on the left is a reconstructed pot found on the Etowah River north of Canton. It is a deep conoidal jar with an eccentric rim, applied knobs just below the neck and applied decoration at the rim. The larger stone bowl is a soapstone bowl found on Little River; soapstone was used for bowls because it retains heat well. It is most likely from the Archaic Period, probably 1600-1000 B.C. The object in front is a ceremonial celt from Wilbanks Mound. It is from the Mississippian Period, most likely 1250-1375. (Photos courtesy of Lisa Tressler)
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From “Survey and Excavations of the Archaeological Resources of the Allatoona Reservoir” by Joseph R. Caldwell, University of Georgia Laboratory of Archaeology Series Report Number 63, 2011. This is from the 1949 excavation at Woodstock Fort. U.S. Army engineers loaned a mechanized scraper in a desperate attempt to expose the fort prior to flooding. (Photos courtesy of Lisa Tressler.)
From “Survey and Excavations of the Archaeological Resources of the Allatoona Reservoir” by Joseph R. Caldwell, University of Georgia Laboratory of Archaeology Series Report Number 63, 2011. This is from the 1949 excavation at Woodstock Fort. U.S. Army engineers loaned a mechanized scraper in a desperate attempt to expose the fort prior to flooding. (Photos courtesy of Lisa Tressler.)
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CANTON — A new temporary exhibit at the Cherokee County History Museum is digging into Cherokee County’s past.

“Unearthing the Past: Archaeology in Cherokee County” opened to the public Wednesday and runs until April 12. The exhibit explores the last 80 years of archaeological investigations in Cherokee County, highlights some of the more than 1,000 archaeological sites in the area, and features rarely seen artifacts found in Cherokee, the Historical Society said.

The 50 objects on display are all from private collections and are on display for the first time. They represent more than 8,000 years of Native American occupation and include ceremonial objects, game pieces, weapons and tools, said Lisa Tressler, archivist for the Cherokee County Historical Society.

Tressler compiled the data and wrote the panels for the exhibit.

“Native Americans called Cherokee County home for 13,000 years. The Cherokee accounted for approximately 50 of those years. With this exhibit, we hope to open a window to the lives of not just the Cherokee but also these earlier cultures,” Tressler said in a release.

The museum is in the Cherokee County White Marble Courthouse and is a part of the work of the Cherokee County Historical Society.

Executive Director Stefanie Joyner said artifacts from the major archaeological sites are represented, including Long Swamp, Wilbanks Mound and Hickory Log.

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Nancy Morris
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January 22, 2014
This is amazing, this should be seen by our school children.
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