KSU class donates block print to museum
by MDJ staff
December 14, 2013 12:00 AM | 1263 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Kennesaw city officials accepted the donation of a block print produced by a Kennesaw State University art class during a ceremony at the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History, 2829 Cherokee Street in Kennesaw, on Dec. 7. Above: From left are Harrison Long, director of the KSU School of Art and Design;  Valerie Dibble, professor of Art; and Kennesaw Mayor Mark Mathews.
Kennesaw city officials accepted the donation of a block print produced by a Kennesaw State University art class during a ceremony at the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History, 2829 Cherokee Street in Kennesaw, on Dec. 7. Above: From left are Harrison Long, director of the KSU School of Art and Design; Valerie Dibble, professor of Art; and Kennesaw Mayor Mark Mathews.
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Kennesaw city officials accepted the donation of a block print produced by a Kennesaw State University art class during a ceremony at the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History, 2829 Cherokee Street in Kennesaw, on Dec. 7. The four-foot by eight-foot print depicts the famous Great Locomotive Chase.

The presentation was made by Harrison Long, director of the School of Art and Design, along with Valerie Dibble, professor of Art, and Samantha Palmer, a KSU graduate who was one of the students who participated in the project. City representatives included Mayor Mark Mathews; City Councilmen Jeff Duckett, Matt Riedemann and Tim Killingsworth; Dr. Richard Banz, executive director of the Southern Museum; and City Manager Steve Kennedy.

The carved wooden block and the print stamped from it were created by students in the KSU advanced printmaking class during a large scale collaborative print event hosted annually by the Atlanta Printmakers Studio. The class worked together to create the design to scale as a paper drawing, then transferred it to the block. Carving was done as a group. The project took half a semester. The event’s theme for this year was Storytelling.

The print and wood block will be on permanent display at the museum.

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