New invention seals bags tight with tape, not clips
by Sally Litchfield
November 26, 2013 10:00 PM | 3324 views | 1 1 comments | 39 39 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Freshtape, the invention of Marietta resident Laura Wilkinson Sinton and her business partner, Liz Gullum, is now in stores from Maine to Seattle and have 29 selling locations in the Atlanta area. They launched their idea for a functioning way to seal opened bags of potato chips with a re-sealable tape that comes in various designs. <br>Staff/Kelly J. Huff
Freshtape, the invention of Marietta resident Laura Wilkinson Sinton and her business partner, Liz Gullum, is now in stores from Maine to Seattle and have 29 selling locations in the Atlanta area. They launched their idea for a functioning way to seal opened bags of potato chips with a re-sealable tape that comes in various designs.
Staff/Kelly J. Huff
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Tired of cupboard chaos? American-made Freshtape is a fast, new way to organize and save food in the pantry and kitchen.

Invented by east Cobb resident Laura Wilkinson Sinton and her best friend, Elizabeth Gullum of Asheville, N.C., the all-purpose kitchen tape is an easy way to seal food bags in the pantry, refrigerator and freezer.

“No one loves their bag clips. They use things like binder clips, rubber bands, paperclips, sometimes they just fold it over,” Sinton said.

“To really get a seal on it and get it really airtight you need something that’s really going to work,” Sinton said. Sinton and her husband, Jon, have four grown children and two grandchildren.

The kitchen tape in decorative patterns can be resealed and works on flexible packaging from pantry to freezer.

The idea for Freshtape evolved from a conversation between the two friends one Christmas Eve. Gullum told Sinton she was washing chip clips (“germ-vectors”) to avoid the spread of germs from a visitor to her home who was sick.

“(Liz) said someone needs to invent some sort of tape we can use on chips,” she said.

After Sinton’s position at the company where she worked was eliminated in a merger, she took time off. “I came back and was cleaning out my pantry because there were gray moths in it. I couldn’t get rid of them,” she said.

Sinton threw out all the food from her pantry except canned goods, but the moths reappeared three weeks later. “I realized there were gray moth eggs on the inside of the chip clips,” she said.

“I called Liz and told her if we can’t find a tape we’ve got to invent one. That’s where the adventure began,” Sinton said.

The two friends worked with adhesive and chemical companies to come up with an adhesive that was FDA compliant and safe for food use.

“Painter’s tape and scotch tape and duck tape are not FDA compliant. They use all sorts of toxins you’re not allowed to get in your food for adhesive purposes,” she said.

After a series of tests, they found the right adhesive.

“Everything else fell into place,” Sinton said.

Freshtape is a versatile kitchen tool.

“We originally designed the tape for chips but what we found out that our friends were using it for freezer vegetables, they were using it on coffee bags, they were using it as an all-purpose kitchen tape,” Sinton said.

For more information and to purchase Freshtape, visit www.freshtape.com.

Comments
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sounds great
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November 27, 2013
All I can say is, I want some of that tape! I, too, use a lot of chip clips and now I would like to be able to deep-six them for something more sanitary. And great coming from America!
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