Foley’s warped views on hero show contempt for American ideals
October 14, 2013 11:13 PM | 1187 views | 13 13 comments | 32 32 recommendations | email to a friend | print
DEAR EDITOR:

Kevin Foley wrote “An apology to Private Parnam” in which he related his thoughts after visiting the World War II American Cemetery in Luxembourg. His thoughts juxtaposed his blind political beliefs onto a young man who gave his life for what he believed in: his country.

I am no stranger to World War II American cemeteries. My wife and I have been fortunate to be able to pay our respects to our Pacific war dead at the “Punch Bowl” and the USS Arizona memorials in Hawaii, and to the graves of our youth who died fighting the war in Europe. We stood in dreadful awe at the white gravestones and green grass at Normandy, France; Florence, Italy; and in the Luxembourg cemetery that Foley refers to.

When we made these journeys, we were accompanied by various groups of Americans. Some of these visitors were combat veterans of the war; all the rest of us were mature citizens whose age and experience connected us more closely to events of that war. In my judgment, these visitors had already grasped the enormous price paid by our fallen countrymen, and came not to discover, but to pay homage. They understood that those laid to rest under white markers remain an indisputable part in the making of America.

Our fellow visitors approached the somber — yet beautiful — rows of white markers with respect, as they searched the markers for names, home states or perhaps religions, that connected them to the soldier buried there.

What they did not search for was the soldier’s political affiliation. If these very young soldiers had ever thought about politics, those thoughts certainly found no space in the wartime reality of life and death. Our war cemeteries do not commemorate partisan political activities, nor do gravestones list political affiliations: They commemorate the great cost of protecting our precious liberty.

Whereas honorable Americans — and even citizens of the host countries — displayed gratitude to those who served, Foley found opportunities to usurp the dignity of a warrior, and to impute Foley’s own warped political views onto the blameless hero.

As a student of history, I have traveled to most of the major Civil War battlefields — including Petersburg where my great-grandfather was taken by federal forces — and to some of the crucial Revolutionary war sites. On these battlefields men (and women) fought for the freedom to choose a government responsive — not to politicians — but to its citizenry.

Time and conditions have evolved our form of government into something that our ancestors would hardly recognize. However, we can be pretty certain that they did not die in the pursuit of a socialistic control of their personal lives. They declared for “liberty or death” — not for “share the wealth.” They favored equality, but not an equality that was imposed by an overpowering government. They were open to progress, but would have rejected the “progressivism” so abusively asserted by Foley.

Foley’s article, once again, illustrates his massive contempt for American ideals. He implies — idiotically — that those who died honorably must have made their sacrifice in support of the bizarre ideology that Foley endlessly advocates. It is obvious that Foley has infinite self-regard: a narcissistic personality level approaching that of his idol in the White House. His egocentric personality does not permit him to recognize that he does not understand most of what he thinks he knows.

Personally, I find it very difficult to accept that Foley actually believes much of what he writes. It does not seem reasonable that an intelligent being could stray so far from reality. I can only conclude that he is so ignorant of American history that he cannot see how ridiculous his theses sound to educated people.

Rod Paramoure

Marietta

Comments
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Harry Hagan
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October 22, 2013
It is Rod Paramoure who should have a weekly column.

Balance is good, but hateful and unenlightened spumescence is horribly unattractive, and helps nothing. Expropriating the name of a fallen hero in order to sell a frightful ideology is heinous and hideous.
Kevin Foley
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October 22, 2013
Come on, be honest, Harry. You don't care about "balance." You only want to read and hear opinions with which you agree. Anything else to you is "frightful," "heinous" or "hideous."

Mr. Hagan is the perfect example of epistemic closure.
beautiful thoughts
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October 15, 2013
This is one of the most touching letters I have ever read regarding our war dead. The phrase that sticks in my mind is "those laid to rest under white markers remain an indisputable part in the making of America". These people literally changed the history of the world! It struck me after reading both this letter and Mr. Hiron's that the MDJ has some readers who write more inspirationally than a paid hack like Foley. And we need inspiration right now not political carping.
Kevin Foley
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October 15, 2013
Mr. Paramoure's is the third letter published by the MDJ this week attacking my Private Parman column. All three offer the same Rush Limbaugh, Fox News-infused argument that Private Parman would have sided with tea party conservatives, their idiotic shutdown of the government, and their taking the nation to the brink of default, risking a worldwide economic collapse.

I say Private Parman would be appalled if he saw what these disgraceful people were doing to America.

West Cobb
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October 16, 2013
@ Kevin Foley

Let's just get to the fact of this matter. This whole argument has been about whether we wake up in the morning free and independent Americans or "Socialists." It's not been about government shutdown, budget ceilings or global economic collapse but about who has the power... the people or the government. In America we've always believed that power belongs to the people but now that's changing. Now power belongs to the government. In the morning we will wake up "Socialists." From this day on the power in America will be with the government. We'll move from socialized medicine to socialized education to a socialized workforce to socialized production etc etc etc. From this day on there will always be a legitimate case for centralized planning and management by the government. "We The People" is now just a quaint slogan from our colonial past that was dreamed up by some poor, ignorant, and misguided souls. The vote is now in. The conservatives failed. We're now "Socialists."

just sayin
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October 17, 2013
@West Cobb

Sounds like you are channeling 1961 Ronald Reagan on "Medicare" the most popular government program of all time.

"Write those letters now call your friends, and tell them to write them. If you don't, this program I promise you will pass just as surely as the sun will come up tomorrow. And behind it will come other Federal programs that will invade every area of freedom as we have known it in the country until one day we will awake to find that we have socialism. And if you don't do this, and if I don't do it, one of these days, you and I are going to spend out sunset years telling our children, and our children's children what it was like in America when men were free."

Wrong then, wrong now! Were still free and I love Medicare!
Guido Sarducci
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October 17, 2013
@West Cobb - Open you eyes and look around. Everything that Reagan predicted has come true or is in the process of it.

We are not free. Government is invading every area of our lives from the light bulbs we can buy to the size of the soft drink we fill out gut with.

We are just a short ways from socialized medicine, the Common Core Cirriculum will finish socializing education, the government has illegally seized private companies, is telling priests and ministers when they can and cannot minister to our military.

And you don't see anything wrong with it. People like you make me wonder what has happened to intelligence in this country.

And, your beloved Medicare is the most fraud ridden government program in existence with the possible exception of NSA and FEMA.
Guida Sarducci
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October 17, 2013
My apologes to West Cobb. My previous rant was aimed at "Just Saying".

Guido Sarducci
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October 17, 2013
Well, Foley. you are entitled to your opinion, which is, as usual, all wrong.

It was the President and his idiot body slave Reid, and their stubborn refusal to sit down and talk that led to the shut down. As to the default, that was purely an Obama invention. There is enough money coming in to meet those obligations and there was never any need for, or danger of, a default.

The blind insistence that Obamacare is the law and must be done is crap, in light of the number og exemptions, exceptions and waivers which have already been illegally granted, by our law abiding President. The entire thing could have been avoided by one more illegal act of granting a one year delay in the individual mandate. That would not have precluded anyone from signing onto the program. It would simply have not forced anyone to do so.
dave y
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October 17, 2013
It's amazing how conservatives inevitably confuse "We the People" with Every man for himself".
just sayin
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October 18, 2013
@ Guido Sarducci

Yes I like Medicare, realizing that individuals in their sixty's and beyond, with pre-existing conditions will never be able to purchase private affordable health insurance makes me question your intelligence.

"The legitimate object of Government falls into two classes; those which have relation to wrongs and those that do not: The first embraces all crimes, misdemeanors, and non performance of contracts. The other embraces all which in it's nature, and without wrong, requires "COMBINED ACTION", as public roads and highways, public schools, charities, pauperism, orphanages, estates of the deceased and the machinery of government itself".

Abraham Lincoln

anonymous
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October 18, 2013
@Guido Sarducci

I would suspect that any government program that did not profit the wealthy would be corrupt to you. I do like Medicare, not realizing that people in their sixty's and beyond, with pre-existing conditions, will never be able to purchase affordable private health insurance makes me question your intelligence.
anonymous
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October 19, 2013
When they come for Foley's business, he won't be so smug.

So far, if you have a gun or ammo business, they're on your back. Own a business that imports wood, such as a guitar business or a flooring business? They're gunnin' for ya. Those government regulators ain't caring what your excuses are.

Had a farm for a few generations? Better get in line with Obama's regs. Own a car business and not on Obama's crony list? Buh-bye! You get the point.
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