Bipartisan vote on back pay belies shutdown chasm
by Charles Babington, Associated Press and Stephen Ohlemacher, Associated Press
October 06, 2013 12:01 AM | 1510 views | 1 1 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and House Democratic leaders discuss the government shutdown and their disagreement with Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio) at a news conference at the Capitol in Washington on Saturday. There has been no sign of progress toward ending the impasse. <br>The Associated Press
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and House Democratic leaders discuss the government shutdown and their disagreement with Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio) at a news conference at the Capitol in Washington on Saturday. There has been no sign of progress toward ending the impasse.
The Associated Press
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WASHINGTON — A rare flash of bipartisanship Saturday served as a cruel tease to those hoping Congress is moving toward reopening the government and averting an unprecedented default on the federal debt in less than two weeks.

Only two days after House Speaker John Boehner raised hopes by telling colleagues he won’t let the nation go into default, key members of both parties conceded that no one has presented a plausible plan for avoiding it. Instead, they continued to bicker and to ponder the chasm between two warring parties, each of which seems convinced it’s on the winning side morally and politically.

There was, however, relief Saturday for thousands of furloughed Pentagon workers and the promise of back pay for all federal workers who have been forced off the job.

The Pentagon on Saturday ordered at least 90 percent of its roughly 350,000 furloughed civilian employees back to work, significantly reducing the number of sidelined federal workers. In all, about 800,000 federal workers had been furloughed.

Defense Department said the recall is based on a law passed by Congress this week that allows the Pentagon to end furloughs for “employees whose responsibilities contribute to the morale, well-being, capabilities and readiness of service members.” Republicans had complained that the administration was slow to bring back those workers in light of the law.

The larger stalemate over reopening the federal government persists. Boehner, asked Saturday whether Congress was any closer to resolving the impasse, replied: “No.” Aides close to Boehner say he has not figured out how to end the gridlock.

Even the day’s top bipartisan achievement — agreeing to pay furloughed federal employees for the work days they are missing — was a thin victory. Congress made the same deal after the mid-1990s shutdowns, and Saturday’s 407-0 vote was widely expected.

Still, it triggered the sort of derisive quarreling that has prevented Congress from resolving the larger funding and debt dilemmas.

“Of all the bizarre moments” involved in the debate, said Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-Texas), “this may be the most bizarre: that we will pay people not to work.” He called it “the new tea party sense of fiscal responsibility.”

House Republicans said they want to ease the pain from the partial shutdown. Democrats said Congress should fully re-open the government and let employees work for the pay they’re going to receive.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said Saturday the Democratic-controlled Senate will approve retroactive pay for furloughed workers, although he didn’t specify when.

The politics of the 5-day-old partial government shutdown have merged with partisan wrangling over the graver issue of raising the federal debt limit by Oct. 17. If that doesn’t happen, the White House says, the government will be unable to pay all its bills, including interest on debt. Economists say a U.S. default would stun world markets and likely send this nation, and possibly others, into recession.

Boehner (R-Ohio) and Obama say they abhor the idea of a default. But they and their respective parties have not budged from positions that bar a solution.

Obama says he will not negotiate tax and spending issues if they are linked to a debt-ceiling hike. Boehner and his GOP allies say they will not raise the ceiling unless Democrats agree to deep spending cuts.

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Diamond Jim
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October 06, 2013
Why should furloughed Federal workers get paid for their time off? It amounts to a paid vacation. They stay home for a week or two, go back to work, and get paid for the time they were off. Teachers and other local and state employees taking furlough days to help balance strained budgets don't get paid for that time later. Neither do laid off workers in the private sector collect back pay when they are called back to work. What is so special, so sacrosanct about Federal jobs, that those workers should somehow be immune to facing economic reality? Their pay scales are already well above the average pay for comparable private sector jobs, and they are being paid with tax dollars. Why should they be valued above the rest of us just because they work for the government? Makes no sense whatsoever!
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