5 US institutions to share meteorite pieces
August 22, 2013 08:00 AM | 450 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this May 30, 2012 photo provided by the University of California-Davis, geology professor Qing-zhu Yin holds a fragment of the rare Sutter's Mill meteorite donated by an alum in spring 2012 in Davis. UC-Davis is one of five institutions that have since acquired the main mass of the Sutter's Mill meteorite that exploded over California's Sierra foothills in April 2012. The other four receiving a piece of the rare meteorite are: The Field Museum in Chicago; the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington; the American Museum of Natural History in New York; and Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Courtesy of University of California-Davis, Gregory Urquiaga)
In this May 30, 2012 photo provided by the University of California-Davis, geology professor Qing-zhu Yin holds a fragment of the rare Sutter's Mill meteorite donated by an alum in spring 2012 in Davis. UC-Davis is one of five institutions that have since acquired the main mass of the Sutter's Mill meteorite that exploded over California's Sierra foothills in April 2012. The other four receiving a piece of the rare meteorite are: The Field Museum in Chicago; the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington; the American Museum of Natural History in New York; and Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Courtesy of University of California-Davis, Gregory Urquiaga)
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This July 2013 photo provided by the Smithsonian Institution via the University of California-Davis, shows the main mass of the rare Sutter's Mill meteorite after the Smithsonian Institution cut it and divided it among five U.S. academic institutions. The five institutions receiving a piece of the rare meteorite are: The Field Museum in Chicago; the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington; the American Museum of Natural History in New York; Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz.; and the University of California-Davis. The 205 gram mass is the largest stone recovered from the meteorite that exploded over California's Sierra foothills in April 2012. (AP Photo/Courtesy the Smithsonian Institution via the University of California-Davis)
This July 2013 photo provided by the Smithsonian Institution via the University of California-Davis, shows the main mass of the rare Sutter's Mill meteorite after the Smithsonian Institution cut it and divided it among five U.S. academic institutions. The five institutions receiving a piece of the rare meteorite are: The Field Museum in Chicago; the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington; the American Museum of Natural History in New York; Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz.; and the University of California-Davis. The 205 gram mass is the largest stone recovered from the meteorite that exploded over California's Sierra foothills in April 2012. (AP Photo/Courtesy the Smithsonian Institution via the University of California-Davis)
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CHICAGO (AP) — Five U.S. institutions will share parts of a rare meteorite that exploded in a fireball over California last year, The Field Museum said Wednesday.

The meteor dates to the early formation of the solar system 4 to 5 billion years ago. It was probably about the size of a minivan when it entered the Earth's atmosphere on April 22, 2012 with a loud boom. It was seen from Sacramento, Calif., to Las Vegas and parts of northern Nevada.

Field Museum curator Philipp Heck said the institution will preserve the meteorite for "future generations of scientists who will be armed with analytical tools which we can only dream of today."

The Smithsonian cut the 205 gram meteorite into five sections that will go to five institutions: The Field Museum in Chicago; the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington; the American Museum of Natural History in New York; Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz.; and the University of California-Davis.

Scientists plan to use the pieces for research. They used a CT scan to determine the meteor's age and chemical composition.

Private collector Robert Haag owned the meteorite and contacted Meenakshi Wadhwa, director of Arizona State University's Center for Meteorite Studies. She contacted the other institutions to discuss sharing the piece.

After the explosion it was possible that bits of the meteor were strewn over an area as long as 10 miles, most likely stretching west from Coloma, where James W. Marshall first discovered gold in California, at Sutter's Mill in 1848.



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