Schniederjans part of Tech trio to qualify for U.S. Amateur
by Emily Horos
ehoros@mdjonline.com
July 25, 2013 12:30 AM | 1736 views | 0 0 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print
At the end of his round Wednesday, unsure of the other scores in the field, Ollie Schniederjans seemed resigned to missing out on the U.S. Amateur. Unbeknownst to the Harrison product and Georgia Tech standout, he did make it in as one of three Yellow Jackets to earn berths from the qualifier at Capital City Club’s Crabapple Course.
<Br>Staff photo by Todd Hull
At the end of his round Wednesday, unsure of the other scores in the field, Ollie Schniederjans seemed resigned to missing out on the U.S. Amateur. Unbeknownst to the Harrison product and Georgia Tech standout, he did make it in as one of three Yellow Jackets to earn berths from the qualifier at Capital City Club’s Crabapple Course.
Staff photo by Todd Hull
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MILTON — Anders Albertson is still just 20 years old, but the Georgia Tech standout will be making his third trip to the U.S. Amateur.

The native of nearby Woodstock won a 36-hole qualifier at Capital City Club’s Crabapple Course.

Albertson, who held a two-shot lead entering Wednesday’s second round, shot 67 for a two-day total of 7-under par 133. He finished two shots ahead of Georgia Tech teammate Seth Reeves (135).

A third Yellow Jacket, former Harrison High School star Ollie Schniederjans, and Alabama standout Scott Strohmeyer were tied for third at 138.

Scott Wolfes and Victor Perez tied for fifth at 139, and with only five golfers assured of berths into the U.S. Amateur, they went to a playoff.

Wolfes, a Georgia Southern golfer, and Perez, who joined his New Mexico teammates in the NCAA championship at Capital City Club in May, went to five playoff holes before Wolfes prevailed with a birdie.

Perez was named the first alternate, while Armstrong Atlantic’s Jacob Tilton is the second alternate after winning a playoff with two others after shooting 140.

Albertson, Reeves, Schniederjans and Strohmeyer played the course extensively during the NCAA championship. Their experience seemed to pay off, particularly in the second round, when scores were much higher.

Albertson said he felt in control from start to finish Wednesday — owing largely to the two-stroke lead he had entering the day. Unlike Tuesday, when Albertson had seven birdies, he had just three in the second round. Still, he kept his score low with a bogey-free round.

“I made the turn at 2-under and made a couple of good saves on 10 and 11,” Albertson said. “I had a couple of easy, tap-in birdies. I think 14 through 18 are the hardest stretch on the course. I kept it in the fairway and gave myself some good shots to make pars and finish it off. I didn’t seem like I had to work that hard (Wednesday).”

Albertson will travel to Brookline, Mass., next month for the U.S. Amateur, after previously making the prestigious tournament in 2009 and ’11. Both times, he missed the cut in stroke play.

If Albertson felt in control Wednesday, Schniederjans did not.

Putting for par on 18, he was concerned that he had missed out on qualifying. Sitting at the scorer’s table, Schniederjans asked what the low score was, and he was shocked that it was his 138.

With just three players still on the course, Schniederjans was assured of his spot in the U.S. Amateur.

“I thought I missed it, then I had a bit of a temper tantrum, then a realized I made it,” Schniederjans said, who won a qualifier in Atlanta and made it into the first round of stroke play at last year’s U.S. Amateur in Colorado. “I was a little surprised. This qualifier just gave me a heart attack the whole time. It’s just so nerve-racking.”

Schniederjans said he put himself under pressure to qualify.

“It’s the biggest tournament,” he said. “I feel like I should be in it. It’s basically my last chance at making a Walker Cup team. I just really wanted to go to Brookline. There are just so many reasons. I guess I played good enough. I hung in there.”

Schniederjans was 1-over through nine holes. He birdied 11 and 12 to put himself in a better position.

“I’m just lucky I made it,” he said. “I thought I needed to birdie 18.”

Among those failing to qualify were a couple of other local players.

Charlie Harrison, a former Whitefield Academy standout, shot 141, one stroke ahead of Harrison product Michael Garretson. Former Walton golfer David Yowell shot 144, with his former Raiders teammate, John Yi, at 145 with Kennesaw’s Christian Raynor.

Another Whitefield product, Ty Hampel, shot 150 and was joined by Marietta resident Scott Davenport (151) and Lassiter alums Michael Toler (154) and Adam Wright (156).

With Albertson, Reeves and Schniederjans in the U.S. Amateur, there are now four Georgia Tech golfers who have qualified, including Bo Andrews, who made it in through a qualifier in Virginia earlier this week. Two others, Richy Werenski and Kell product Michael Hines, will vie for berths next week.

“It will be nice to see everyone again, but we aren’t going there to celebrate,” Albertson said. “It’ll be good.”

A second local U.S. Amateur qualifier will take place next week in Athens. Among the locals registered for the event are Mount Paran Christian’s Tyler Young, Kennesaw State’s Jimmy Beck, Walton graduate Anthony Amodeo and Kyle Putkonen, a former baseball and basketball standout at Walton.

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