Stay of execution rejected: Man who killed Mercer students declared dead
by The Associated Press
February 22, 2013 01:55 AM | 1571 views | 2 2 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Andrew Allen Cook
Andrew Allen Cook
slideshow
JACKSON — A 38-year-old inmate convicted of killing two college students in 1995 was executed in Georgia on Thursday, apologizing to the families of both before being injected at the state prison.

Andrew Allen Cook was pronounced dead at 11:22 p.m., about 14 minutes after he was injected with the lethal drug.

With his last words, he apologized to the families of Mercer University students Grant Patrick Hendrickson, 22, and Michele Lee Cartagena, 19, who were shot several times as they sat in a car at Lake Juliette. He said what he did was senseless.

“I’m sorry,” Cook said as he was strapped to a gurney. “I’m not going to ask you to forgive me. I can’t even do it myself.”

He also thanked his family for “their support, for being with me and I’m sorry I took so much from you all.”

The Georgia Appeals Court on Wednesday temporarily stayed Cook’s execution to consider a challenge to the state’s lethal injection procedure.

But the Georgia Supreme Court lifted the stay Thursday and all other appeals were exhausted.

Cook was the first inmate to be executed since the state changed its execution procedure in July from a three-drug combination to a single dose of the sedative pentobarbital.

Cook’s lawyers have argued at various stages in their appeals of his death sentence that he suffered from mental illness and was being treated for depression up to the time of his death.

Mary Hendrickson, mother of one of the victims, recently told television station WMAZ-TV in Macon she’s been waiting 18 years for justice.

“I think that’s what it was: the devil’s work,” she said. “When all that is going on, I was just thinking to myself: ‘Well, the devil is not going to win. He’s not going to win over my heart. He is not going to win.’”

The single-drug injection began at about 11:08 p.m. Cook blinked his eyes a few times, and his eyes soon got heavy. His chest was heaving for about two or three minutes as his eyes closed. Not too long after, two doctors examined him and nodded and Carl Humphrey, warden of the state prison in Jackson, pronounced him dead.

Corrections officials said shortly before the execution was scheduled to start that Cook had received visits from family Thursday and ate the last meal he had requested — steak, a baked potato, potato wedges, fried shrimp, lemon meringue pie and soda.

A Monroe County jury sentenced Cook to death after he was convicted in the January 2, 1995 slayings at Lake Juliette, which is about 75 miles south of Atlanta. Cook wasn’t charged until more than two years later. He confessed to his father, a Macon FBI agent who ended up testifying at his son’s trial.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation reached out to John Cook in December 1995 because they were interested in speaking to his son. When he called his then-22-year-old son to tell him the GBI wanted to talk to him, he had no idea the younger man was considered a suspect.

“I said, ‘Andy, the GBI is looking for you concerning the Lake Juliette homicide. Do you know anything about it?’” John Cook testified at his son’s trial in March 1998. “He said, ‘Daddy, I can’t tell you. You’re one of them. ... You’re a cop.’”

Eventually, Andrew Cook told his father that he knew about the slayings, that he was there and that he knew who shot the couple, John Cook recalled.

“I just felt like the world was crashing in on me. But I felt maybe he was there and just saw what happened,” he said. “I then asked, ‘Did you shoot them?’

“After a pause on the phone, he said, ‘Yes.’”

As a law enforcement officer, John Cook said he was forced to call his supervisor and contacted the Monroe County sheriff.

At the trial, as he walked away from the stand, the distraught father mouthed “I’m sorry” to the victims’ families who were sitting on the front row of the Henry County courtroom. Several members of both families acknowledged his apology.
Comments
(2)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
VFP42
|
February 22, 2013
Why do we spend so much money just to kill people when people will die naturally for free?

If we insist on killing people, why don't we sell these death row inmates to Ford Chevy GM and Chrysler to use in crash tests? We could get our money back and our prison industrial complex could yield greater profits.
Gringo Bandito
|
February 22, 2013
I used to think Mary was the craziest person here, but lately she seems almost lucid compared to you and your ramblings.
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, and spam will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides