No oil spill seen at Shell drill ship in Alaska
by Dan Joling, Associated Press
January 01, 2013 01:00 PM | 1219 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Shell Oil incident commander Susan Childs, second from right, answers a question about the Monday night grounding of the Shell drill ship Kulluk at a press conference on Monday, Dec. 31, 2012, at the Mariott Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska. Looking on are Shell Alaska spokesman Curtis Smith, standing, Coast Guard Commander Shane Montoya, state on-scene coordinator Alan Wien, and Garth Pulkkinen of Noble Corp., the operator of the Kulluk. The drifting Shell drill ship that broke loose from tow vessels during a severe Gulf of Alaska storm ran aground Monday in shallow water off Sitkalidak Island, company officials said. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
Shell Oil incident commander Susan Childs, second from right, answers a question about the Monday night grounding of the Shell drill ship Kulluk at a press conference on Monday, Dec. 31, 2012, at the Mariott Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska. Looking on are Shell Alaska spokesman Curtis Smith, standing, Coast Guard Commander Shane Montoya, state on-scene coordinator Alan Wien, and Garth Pulkkinen of Noble Corp., the operator of the Kulluk. The drifting Shell drill ship that broke loose from tow vessels during a severe Gulf of Alaska storm ran aground Monday in shallow water off Sitkalidak Island, company officials said. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
slideshow
Arctic Drill Ship Slideshow
In this photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, the tug Aiviq travels at just under 2 mph with the mobile drilling unit Kulluk in tow 116 miles southwest of Kodiak City, Alaska, Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012. The crews remain stationed with the drill rig Kulluk Sunday 20 miles from Alaska's Kodiak Island as they wait in rough seas for another tug boat to arrive. The Coast Guard says the goal is to tow the Kulluk to a safe harbor and determine the next step. (AP Photo/U.S Coast Guard, Chris Usher)
view slideshow (12 images)
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — An overnight Coast Guard flight over an Alaska drilling rig that ran aground in shallow water on New Year’s Eve found no signs of a fuel spill.

But officials at a unified command center run by the Coast Guard, Royal Dutch Shell PLC, state responders and others say they’ll have to wait until daylight to know for sure what environmental impact the grounding might have caused.

Spokeswoman Darci Sinclair says the North Pacific storm that has caused problems for Shell’s efforts to move the drill into place near Kodiak Island is expected to continue Tuesday, at a slightly milder intensity. The storm has included winds near 70 mph and swells to 35 feet.

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