Colonial Dames mark 100 years: Genealogical society celebrates anniversary, publishes first book
by Sally Litchfield
MDJ Features Editor
sallylit@bellsouth.net
November 28, 2012 12:00 AM | 2681 views | 1 1 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print

From left, Jane Daniel, chairman of the Marietta Town Committee of The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Georgia, stands with Caroline Witcher, Sybil Little and Florrie Corley who have been members of the organization for 62, 42 and about 50 years respectively. <br>Staff/Laura Moon
From left, Jane Daniel, chairman of the Marietta Town Committee of The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Georgia, stands with Caroline Witcher, Sybil Little and Florrie Corley who have been members of the organization for 62, 42 and about 50 years respectively.
Staff/Laura Moon
slideshow
The published book of the Marietta Town Committee of The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Georgia details the establishment of Marietta Town Committee in 1912 by 10 women who were certified members of the Georgia Society of the Colonial Dames of America.
The published book of the Marietta Town Committee of The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Georgia details the establishment of Marietta Town Committee in 1912 by 10 women who were certified members of the Georgia Society of the Colonial Dames of America.
slideshow
Anne Herbert of Marietta, a member of the Marietta Town Committee since 1999, recites the 'Salute to the Flag' with her mother, Florrie Corley, who has been a member for about 50 years, during the celebration of the group's book.
Anne Herbert of Marietta, a member of the Marietta Town Committee since 1999, recites the 'Salute to the Flag' with her mother, Florrie Corley, who has been a member for about 50 years, during the celebration of the group's book.
slideshow
The Marietta Town Committee of the National Society of Colonial Dames of America, a genealogical society for women in the U.S., celebrates its 100th anniversary this year. The MTC continues its mission of preservation, patriotism and education.

“Our Dames share a love of history as well as a love of country, and we joyfully create projects that meet our mission’s goals,” said Carolyn Markert in an address to the MTC and guests at a luncheon celebrating the100th anniversary on Oct. 26 at Marietta Country Club. Markert, a Flowery Branch resident serves on the History Committee of MTC.

“This anniversary marks not only 100 years of service in our state and community and even nationally but it’s special because we have recorded those 100 years in our book,” she said.

The book, a history of contributions of notable women in Marietta titled “The First 100 Years of the Marietta Town Committee of the National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Georgia,” details the establishment of MTC in 1912 by 10 women who were certified members of the Georgia Society of the Colonial Dames of America. These founding members began meeting in 1902 as the “Marietta Circle” and formed the Town Committee after the Georgia Society of Colonial Dames granted them the right to establish a local chapter.

“We’ve endured because we’re a group of women who are bound by a common purpose. We’re part of a national society of descendants from colonial men and women who greatly contributed to the founding of our country,” Markert said.

MTC has been strong from its inception on a local, state and national level through a variety of pursuits such as historic preservation and documentation, authoring books, granting scholarships, and educational efforts.

“It is our responsibility as Dames to teach the lessons of patriotism and to preserve our country’s history for others. Our society was founded to keep America’s history alive. We love doing that,” Markert said.

“We celebrate our personal colonial heritage and remember the sacrifices of ancestors that enable us to have a free country. We celebrate Dames who remind others of our country’s history and honor the men and women who continue to sacrifice for freedom and liberty.”

Membership in the MTC is by invitation to women 30 years or older and less than 70 years old who have a qualifying colonial ancestor of importance in accordance to NSCDA guidelines. Although many of the MTC are legacies, a family member cannot nominate a prospective member.

“The MTC has made sure that people from around Georgia understand why we cherish our community and its history,” Markert said.

To order a copy of “The First 100 Years of the Marietta Town Committee of the National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Georgia,” send a $25 check made to The Marietta Town Committee of The NSCDA to Florrie Corley, 285 Kennesaw Ave., Marietta, 0060-1671. Call (770) 427-3052 or email jandfcorley@bellsouth.net.
Comments
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Ernie Olson
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December 02, 2012
Looking for information on Col Ansel P. Rood & his wife Blanche Gibson Rood.

They built and lived in the Rambo-Olson- Green on the Whitlock Avenue home from 1867 to about 1888.

Colonel Roob had a 1200 acre cotton plantation with about 25 slaves in Steward, Cty. GA.

They buil\t the Whitlock home in 1867 to have their chldren atttend school in Marietta and to escape the warm, humid weather Chatahoochie River.

Col. Rood died in 1875. Blanche Rood lived snd entertasined in Whitlock home. She was very popular and social and active in Marietta and Atlanta societies. Mrs. Rood died in 1903.

Hre daughter was married in their Whitlock home in 1888.
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