Occupy members join police in bid to save Ga. home
by Jeff Martin, Associated Press
October 08, 2012 02:10 PM | 848 views | 1 1 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011 file photo, a protestor is carried away past riot police after being arrested as they clear a downtown street during an Occupy Atlanta demonstration late in Atlanta. Less than a year after Occupy Atlanta members clashed with police in riot gear during a tense showdown in an Atlanta park, they’re now drawing support from police officers in an effort to help a longtime detective avoid losing her home to foreclosure.Demonstrators say they’ll join active and retired Atlanta police officers Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, at the Fayetteville home of retired Atlanta police Det. Jaqueline Barber. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
In this Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011 file photo, a protestor is carried away past riot police after being arrested as they clear a downtown street during an Occupy Atlanta demonstration late in Atlanta. Less than a year after Occupy Atlanta members clashed with police in riot gear during a tense showdown in an Atlanta park, they’re now drawing support from police officers in an effort to help a longtime detective avoid losing her home to foreclosure.Demonstrators say they’ll join active and retired Atlanta police officers Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, at the Fayetteville home of retired Atlanta police Det. Jaqueline Barber. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
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ATLANTA (AP) — Less than a year after Occupy Atlanta members clashed with police in riot gear in a downtown park, they’re now protesting alongside officers to help a retired detective avoid losing her home to foreclosure.

Activists planned to join current and retired Atlanta police Monday for a demonstration and discussion at the home of retired Atlanta police Det. Jaqueline Barber in Fayetteville, south of the city.

"The police are in the 99 percent and when it comes down to their economic struggles, we’re going to be there to a shine light on those and organize around those," said Tim Franzen. He and others who were involved with Occupy Atlanta are now part of a group called Occupy Our Homes ATL, which focuses on the housing crisis.

Barber said she is under threat of eviction after her medical bills mounted, partly because of a diagnosis of multiple myeloma, a form of blood cell cancer.

"I know God did not bless me with this house for someone to just come and take it," Barber, 62, said through tears on Monday.

Representatives of Minneapolis-based U.S. Bank, which is involved in the foreclosure proceedings, did not return phone calls and emails from The Associated Press.

Barber said she spent part of her 20-year career "kicking in doors" as a member of a fugitive task force and also worked undercover in a narcotics unit. She was later assigned to Atlanta’s airport, the world’s busiest, before she was struck by a car and retired due to the injury in 2001.

She’s now raising four grandchildren who range in age from 2 to 10, she said. If she’s evicted, she expects that she will be homeless.

A Thursday court hearing in her case is planned. "If she loses, she will be evicted," Franzen predicted.

In November, Atlanta police on horseback and on motorcycles closed in on Woodruff Park downtown, where Occupy Atlanta members had camped in tents. Dozens of demonstrators were arrested in a series of clashes.

Barber is the second police officer Franzen’s group has tried to help avoid foreclosure, he said. The first was a law enforcement officer who ended up losing his Snellville home but is still involved in a court battle over the property.

Elsewhere, retired officers have joined Occupy demonstrators. A retired Philadelphia police captain, Ray Lewis, was arrested while wearing his old uniform during an Occupy Wall Street demonstration outside the New York Stock Exchange in November.

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anonymous
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October 09, 2012
So let's get this straight. Two women, one living on her City of Atlanta police pension and probably all kinds of Social Security disability and other public assistance, can't find money to pay the mortgage, probably for years if they are nearing the point of no return.

The lady stands forlornly in her kitchen with its pickled cabinets, stonework backsplash and more than one expensive knife set on the granite countertop.

Obama, who promised to help people like this, failed to live up to his promises, putting forth a mortgage adjustment program that somehow did not encompass these two adult women -- they were shut out of either applying or they failed to maneuver the red tape even with all of Obama's doorknockers (those community organizers hired with our tax dollars to see to it that Obama supporters would not lose their homes). Meanwhile, the Occupy protestors, who defacated on police cars in states all around the country last year, have decided to use this particular retired police officer to keep their petard in the news. Instead of helping the ladies pay their mortgage, Occupy is using its considerable budget (yes, they are paid protestors with a huge network of money and management)to squat in their yard and yell.

And unemployment is below 8, according to the liberal media and the Obama campaign....who really couldn't care less about the plight of people losing their homes.

I'm sorry the lady is sick and having to raise her grandkids, and I'm sorry she's losing her home to the bank that owns it. But she probably voted for Obama, and that was her mistake.
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