Ohio sheriff supports limits on big-cat ownership
by AP News Now
September 20, 2012 11:00 AM | 874 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this Aug. 25, 2010 file photo, "Noah", left, and "Layla" prowl their enclosure at Stump Hill Farm in Massillon, Ohio. Owners of exotic animals in Ohio must soon start registering their creatures with the state once a new law takes effect on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)
In this Aug. 25, 2010 file photo, "Noah", left, and "Layla" prowl their enclosure at Stump Hill Farm in Massillon, Ohio. Owners of exotic animals in Ohio must soon start registering their creatures with the state once a new law takes effect on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)
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In this May 2, 2012, file photo, a bear, lower left, explores its cage on the farm of Marian Thompson near Zanesville, Ohio, after it was released to Thompson by the Columbus Zoo. Muskingum County Sheriff Matt Lutz, who oversaw the response to an exotic animal release in eastern Ohio, said Friday, Sept. 14, 2012 he hasn't received calls or complaints about five surviving animals since they were returned to the property. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)
In this May 2, 2012, file photo, a bear, lower left, explores its cage on the farm of Marian Thompson near Zanesville, Ohio, after it was released to Thompson by the Columbus Zoo. Muskingum County Sheriff Matt Lutz, who oversaw the response to an exotic animal release in eastern Ohio, said Friday, Sept. 14, 2012 he hasn't received calls or complaints about five surviving animals since they were returned to the property. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)
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ZANESVILLE, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio sheriff who oversaw the response to an exotic animal release is visiting Washington to support a federal bill that would restrict the private ownership and breeding of lions, tigers and other big cats.

The Zanesville Times Recorder reports Muskingum County Sheriff Matt Lutz (lootz) was scheduled Thursday to brief leaders about what happened when a suicidal big-cat owner released lions, tigers and other exotic animals that were killed by authorities last fall.

Lutz says the legislation would help authorities track the cats and conduct inspections.

The briefing also was expected to include actress and animal activist Tippi Hedren, who’s best known for being terrorized by crows in Alfred Hitchcock’s "The Birds." Hedren keeps rescued big cats at her California preserve and helped put together the federal legislation.

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Information from: Times Recorder.

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