State students improve on End-of-Course Tests
by MDJ staff
July 04, 2012 01:23 AM | 2184 views | 3 3 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
ATLANTA — The results of the spring 2012 Georgia End-of-Course Tests show student improvement in seven of eight comparable tests.

In comparing the results to Spring 2011, students demonstrated improvement in U.S. History, Economics, Biology, Physical Science, Ninth Grade Literature, American Literature and Mathematics I. The percentage of students who met or exceeded standards for Mathematics II decreased by 1 percentage point.

In April 2011, the State Board of Education approved a plan to phase out the Georgia High School Graduation Tests, beginning with students who entered ninth grade for the first time in the 2011-2012 school year. For these students, the EOCT counts as 20 percent of the final grade, an increase from the previous 15 percent level.

“It is encouraging to me to see student performance increase in the large majority of the End-of-Course Tests,” said Georgia Superintendent Dr. John Barge. “End-of-Course Tests are more rigorous than the Georgia High School Graduation Tests, so increases are further testament to the great job our teachers are doing delivering the Georgia Performance Standards to students in a way that they are grasping.”

Beginning this school year, End-of-Course Tests will be used as a factor of high school success for accountability purposes on the new College and Career Ready Performance Index.

* U.S. History: 68 percent met or exceeded the standard, an increase of 2 percentage points

* Economics/Business/Free Enterprise: 77 percent met or exceeded the standard, an increase of 5 percentage points

* Biology: 73 percent met or exceeded the standard, an increase of 3 percentage points.

* Physical Science: 77 percent met or exceeded the standard, an increase of 1 percentage point

* Ninth Grade Literature & Composition: 84 percent met or exceeded the standard, an increase of 2 percentage points

* American Literature & Composition: 89 percent met or exceeded the standard, an increase of 1 percentage point

* Mathematics I: 75 percent met or exceeded the standard, an increase of 4 percentage points

* Mathematics II: 54 percent met or exceeded the standard, a decrease of 1 percentage point

* Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) Algebra: 63 percent met or exceeded the standard

* GPS Geometry: 74 percent met or exceeded the standard

GPS Algebra and GPS Geometry are new tests that were not administered last school year.

Any student receiving credit for a course that requires an EOCT must participate. The test serves as the final exam for the course and contributes 15 or 20 percent to each student’s final course grade as provided for in State Board Rule 160-4-2-.13.

The purposes of the EOCTs are to assess student achievement of the GPS in the designated core courses and to provide data to assist in the improvement of instruction and learning. The EOCTs also provide data to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction at the school, system and state levels.

The system-level results will be available no later than July 17 and the school-level results will be available no later than July 31.

Comments
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Between the lines
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July 04, 2012
Look at the math scores. Almost half are failing. So interesting that the AJC has a headline that is the polar opposite....pointing to where there is a HUGE problem in the curriculum. I still can't believe that the state got away with introducing this math in the first place.

Please, someone, show me some accountability. My children, who have never need additional help before, have tutors who are getting rich off of math students.

Or maybe it's a conspiracy to keep students in state, because from what I've heard, everybody's GPA is dropping from this. No decent out of state school will look twice. God only knows what will happen on the SATs and ACTs. South Georgia, here we come.
Ex-teacher
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July 05, 2012
I highly doubt tutors are getting rich off of math students! Most tutors make $20/hour or less and if you factor in drive time for coming to you it is a lot less than that. I do agree that the curriculum sucks, but a majority of those kids failing do not write any notes done, don't practice at home, and barely listen to the teacher or ask questions.
Yeah but,
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July 04, 2012
Scores would have been even higher with the far superior balanced calendar
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