Let’s look at “Income Equality.”
by Pete_Borden
 Politics
February 17, 2014 05:50 PM | 415 views | 2 2 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
The newest carrot being dangled by the liberal administration in an effort to appeal to the entitlement mentality is “correcting the income inequality” that exists in the U.S.  Never mind the fact that it exists, not only in this country, but worldwide.

There are sound reasons for income equality and for its rapid growth, which almost parallels the shift in emphasis from people to technology in employment and compensation.

In short, those who do not choose to avail themselves of the educational opportunities available and prepare themselves for the technology dominated workforce, are going to be on the losing end of income equality game.

However, the economic and social issues leading to income inequality are not being emphasized by this administration and its self-serving “campaign to end income inequality."

The bait being used to ensnare the non-thinking and dependent sector of the population is, “Let’s raise the minimum wage.”  They cleverly avoid talking about the reasons the minimum wage is where it is.  Simply speaking, the minimum wage is where it is because people are still willing to work for it due, in part, to the influx of illegal aliens who can afford to work for the minimum wage or less, because they pay no income taxes and avail themselves of all the social programs in this country.

What the administration fails to point out is the inescapable result of an increase in the minimum wage. Employers will immediately find ways to mechanize and operate more efficiently, thereby enabling them to eliminate jobs.   But the overriding effect will be increased prices of goods and services, which will trigger demands for higher wages for the middle and upper class, and result in the income inequality remaining the same or growing.  The net result will be more unemployment, but no change in the income inequality problem.

What must be grasped is that income inequality is not only a social and economic problem, but an individual problem.  When people are willing to work and become educated for placement in a workplace which demands education and skill instead of numbers, then we will begin to see a decline in the income inequality problem.

But, alas, there will always be the entitlement mentality members of society who are willing to struggle around at the bottom of the income ladder, with their hand out to the government, rather than exercise the initiative required to rise above it.

Now the administration is saying that unemployment is a good thing because it enables one to spend more time with the children and “write poetry.”  I suspect that is a concept which largely depends upon how long the working class is willing support the government “poets.”

“I write poetry while you go to work,
How’s that for a revelation?
Thanks a lot, you conservative jerk.
God bless this liberal plantation”
Comments
(2)
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Lib in Cobb
|
February 25, 2014
@Pete: "fellow journalist". I don't think so!
Kevin Foley
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February 18, 2014
The income inequality discussion isn't about those on the lowest rungs and those at the top. It's all about the middle class being left behind.

Between 1979 and 2007, the last year before the Bush Recession, median family income rose by 35 percent, while incomes for those at the 99th percentile rose by 278 percent.

That's the crux of the income inequality argument, not the minimum wage, which an entirely different discussion. I'll have more to say about income inequality in my next column.

If you're going to make an economic argument, at least substantiate your opinions.

"...the minimum wage is where it is because people are still willing to work for it due, in part, to the influx of illegal aliens who can afford to work for the minimum wage or less, because they pay no income taxes and avail themselves of all the social programs in this country."

At least show us some independent data or facts to back it up. Otherwise you sound like Mel Fein.

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