A special 93rd birthday
by Philip Clements
December 25, 2014 04:00 AM | 991 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A former prisoner of war, decorated veteran Don Scott of Marietta is the only living member of his WWII B-10 bomber crew. <br>Staff/Samantha Shal
A former prisoner of war, decorated veteran Don Scott of Marietta is the only living member of his WWII B-10 bomber crew.
Staff/Samantha Shal
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Scott sits with his wife of 58 years, Martha, and their grandchildren, from left, Scott May, 21, Sam May, 19, Ellen Ward of Dahlonega and Virginia Willis, 20.
Scott sits with his wife of 58 years, Martha, and their grandchildren, from left, Scott May, 21, Sam May, 19, Ellen Ward of Dahlonega and Virginia Willis, 20.
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Scott's Army medals and picture from the 1940s.
Scott's Army medals and picture from the 1940s.
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Among Scott's memorabilia from his time as a prisoner of war is this calendar and notebook he made from cigarette cartons while in a German prison camp. May 2nd is signified as it was the day the POWs were freed. Scott also holds onto this Prisoner of War medal.
Among Scott's memorabilia from his time as a prisoner of war is this calendar and notebook he made from cigarette cartons while in a German prison camp. May 2nd is signified as it was the day the POWs were freed. Scott also holds onto this Prisoner of War medal.
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World War II veteran Don Scott's memorabilia from his time in a German prison camp in 1944 and 1945 includes the fork and knife he was given by the Germans, a cup he made from a soup can, a notebook and calendar he made to commemorate his time in the camp, his Prisoner of War medal and his German dog tag.
World War II veteran Don Scott's memorabilia from his time in a German prison camp in 1944 and 1945 includes the fork and knife he was given by the Germans, a cup he made from a soup can, a notebook and calendar he made to commemorate his time in the camp, his Prisoner of War medal and his German dog tag.
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MARIETTA — A World War II veteran who spent the better part of a year as a German prisoner of war is celebrating his 93rd birthday today with his family, just like he does every year. “I have the coconut cake all cooked and ready to go,” said Martha Scott, a Marietta native and Don Scott’s wife of 58 years. “His mother always made him a coconut cake on his birthday,” she added. Martha Scott said hers is a close family that spends a lot of time with each other. “We all enjoy getting together and having a good time,” she said. “Grandma gets to do the cooking!” Dinner will be turkey, dressing, cranberry salad, potato casserole, sweet potato casserole and an ice-cream cake. It’s a far cry from the horse meat, potatoes and black bread made with sawdust he ate as a prisoner of war. The Scotts’ granddaughters, Ellen Ward of Dahlonega, 25, and Virginia Willis of Rome, 21, have great respect for what their grandfather went through, even if it’s not always easy to put into words. “It’s really hard to explain to people without having x amount of time to do it,” Ward said. “I try to just throw in ‘prisoner of war.’ That’s really the key part.” Willis said her grandfather’s story makes her appreciate history more. “You have a personal connection, almost, with it,” she said. Don Scott moved to Marietta in 1954 and met his wife two years later while working for Lockheed. He worked on the B-47 Stratojet bomber and later the design of a ski version of the C-130 Hercules, which would allow it to land on snow and ice. He retired in 1989. Scott said he enjoys telling his story because it helps him remember what he went through. He said it also helps remind people of the sacrifice made by the men and women who served in WWII. Of 10 B-17 crew members — all of whom survived POW camp — Don Scott is the only one still alive. “We’re getting scarcer and scarcer,” he said. ENLISTING Don Scott was a sophomore electrical engineering student at Virginia Tech in 1943. “I was coming up on 21 years old and the draft board was getting close to drafting me, so about that time, I took the opportunity to get into what was called enlisted reserve,” he said. He said he was supposed to be able to finish school before reporting to the Army Air Force for active duty, but it didn’t work out that way. Basic training was easy, he said, because he was in ROTC at Virginia Tech. After basic training was radio school in South Dakota and then gunnery school in Arizona. “Gunnery school was sort of like a vacation,” he said, because he got to practice shooting .50 caliber guns, compared to radio school where he learned Morse code and how to operate the radio equipment. He said he was classified as a gunner because, as a radioman on a plane, he would have to help defend the plane during an attack. He then did operational training in Florida before spending a week at sea heading across the Atlantic on the RMS Aquitania, a British passenger ship built before the war. “I went through some additional training, briefly, in England. (Then) I started flying missions over Germany,” he said. “I flew as a radio operator.” He said he started flying missions over Germany and German-occupied France and Czechoslovakia in August 1944. A tour of duty for a B-17 crew was generally 25 missions during WWII and the chances of completing 25 missions was slim, as the mortality rate was high. “Our biggest problem flying missions was anti-aircraft,” he said. “All those targets were defended by anti-aircraft batteries. The Germans concentrated their anti-aircraft batteries around these munition plants.” He said his plane would take fire somewhat regularly — “flak” — but it never brought the plane down. “We made it back until the 11th mission,” he said. THE 11TH MISSION “We started out bad,” he said about the 11th mission on September 28, 1944. Scott, a sergeant at the time, said they had “secret equipment” on the plane that had an explosive charge on it in case it fell into enemy hands. The equipment was a safeguard protocol in case the plane was separated from the unit and they returned out of formation. He said they called the unit “friend or foe” and it would identify the plane as Allied so it wouldn’t come under friendly fire. “It was sensitive to shocks and heavy operation … I turned it on as soon as we took off and became airborne,” he said. “On this one mission, we’re going to bomb synthetic oil refineries (in Germany). As soon as I plugged it in, it exploded.” He said he called the pilot and told him what happened, and the pilot made the decision to continue the mission. “But we had received a lot of other damage (at that point),” he said. “We got hit by anti-aircraft fire … and the first thing that happened to me was I started choking. I couldn’t breathe, we had no air. They had shot up the oxygen system. At 27,000 (feet), you got to have oxygen up there at that high.” He said two of the engines were knocked out by the gunfire and a third one was damaged, but the plane was still flying straight and level. “But,” he said. “We were losing altitude. Coming down. And it didn’t take long to come down to where we didn’t need the extra oxygen.” The crew didn’t know it at the time, but Scott said they had veered off their return path and instead of heading back to Britain, they were traveling more southeast in the direction of Spain. He said the decision was made to bail out from the plane rather than attempt an emergency crash landing. He said the pilot had been injured and the copilot noticed they were flying into “rough territory,” meaning it was not occupied by the Allies. On top of that, one of the parachutes had been damaged by gunfire. “I heard the pilot say, ‘Well, it looks like two of you are coming down on the same parachute,’” he said. Luckily, Scott had his own parachute. He said two of the crew members went out before him. “I jumped out and … I flipped out on my back and I could see the plane as I was falling,” he said. “Well, I decided, ‘It’s time to see if this parachute is going to work.’ So I pulled the handle and boy, I received one heck of a jerk, but it opened.” He said the plane was flying pretty low by that point and he could hear a popping noise, which he thought may have been the parachute in the wind. “And then I realized, ‘Oh, that sounds like gunfire,’” he said. He said he and his crew landed near the Rhine River in Germany and they hoped it was occupied by the Allies. “But no. No such luck,” Scott added. Once he was on the ground, he saw his crew down closer to the river. “It felt good to be on solid ground for a change,” Scott said. However, after Scott took a few steps, he said he heard “somebody behind me started hollering.” “I looked around and saw a man in a uniform with a rifle pointed at me and motioned for me to come to him, not go (down to his crew),” he said. “He was speaking in some strange language I didn’t understand. I didn’t know any German, but he used the word ‘Deutschland’ and somehow I had known that it was the other name for Germany.” Once he saw the swastika on the soldier’s uniform, Scott knew how dire his situation was. “This is not friendly territory,” he said. “And that’s how I ended up in the hands of the Germans.” PRISONER OF WAR He said the crew was rounded up and they were put on a train to a Dulag Luft, a German interrogation camp for captured Allied airmen. “I slept on a concrete floor that night with some other prisoners,” he said. “What sleep I got.” At the camp, he was put in a room so tiny he said he could almost touch opposite walls with his arms outstretched. “I remember seeing marks, rows of marks. Some previous prisoner had been in there and checked off the days,” Scott said. He said he was interrogated for days on end, but all he would give the interrogator was his name, rank and serial number. “(The interrogator) was really friendly,” Scott said, laughing. He said at one point, the interrogator thought Scott was a spy because he didn’t cooperate. “They gave up on me and I was put on a train with a guard and went to a permanent prison camp (in October 1944),” he said. He later found out the camp, Stalag Luft IV, was in the eastern part of Germany and is now in Poland. That is where Scott spent his 23rd birthday. He said they marched the prisoners out twice a day to be counted to make sure no one escaped. “I was told there was an escape committee, but I never knew of anybody escaping,” Scott said. LIBERATION In January 1945, the Russian Army was fighting its way west into Germany itself and getting closer to where Scott was being held. “In the camp that I was in, they got panicky and they decided they were going to evacuate the camp,” Scott said. “They didn’t want us being liberated by the Russians.” He said he and the other prisoners were put on the march in February 1945. They were force-marched through the dead of winter until the early spring. “I wore out my shoes,” Scott said. “One of my shoes, the heel was gone completely. We ended up in in Stalag XI-B. That place was crammed full of prisoners.” He said he was put in a big “circus tent” and slept on straw, side-by-side with the other prisoners. “I got lice. Body lice would crawl from one person to the next,” he said. “It didn’t bother you too much in the daytime while you were active, but at night when you were laying still, you would feel them crawling.” Because the Allied armies were getting closer from the west and the Russians were closing in from the east, he said he was put on another march, heading northeast toward Denmark, in April 1945. He remembers getting a pair of new shoes before embarking on the last march. “They were solid, stiff leather with steel toes and steel heels,” he said. “I got back on the march and those shoes tore up my feet. I got to where I could barely walk. I couldn’t keep up with the last column (of marchers).” When they approached the Elbe River, the Germans had everybody wait until nightfall before attempting to cross the river. “Their plan was to ferry us across the river at night because during the daytime, the Allied planes were (attacking) all the boats there on the river,” Scott said. “But they took longer than they had planned on.” He said by the time they got the last of the prisoners across to the other side, the sun was rising and they heard some planes coming their way. “One of them dove down at us and what did we do? We just waved at it,” he said. “He pulled up … and wagged his wings. He recognized us as prisoners.” After the crossing, he said they stopped at a barn in a village in northern Germany for the night. “When we got there, we were told that the British Army was in the next town to the west of us and they were going to come in and take over this village the next day,” Scott said. He said he slept all night long and the next morning, somebody from the road yelled out, “They’re here.” “We ran up there and sure enough, it was the British Army heading up to where we were,” Scott said. “That was the happiest day of my life because I knew I was free. I was liberated.” It was May 2, 1945, and Scott said there were white flags hanging out the windows of some of the nearby houses. “We celebrate May 2 every year,” said Martha Scott.
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Art imitates life: Grandson of Marietta war hero plays his grandfather in movie ‘Unbroken’
by Hilary Butschek
December 25, 2014 04:00 AM | 450 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Stephen Douglas, left, on the set of the movie ‘Unbroken’ with a fellow member of the cast. Douglas plays his grandfather, Clarence Douglas, in the movie. <br>Special to the MDJ
Stephen Douglas, left, on the set of the movie ‘Unbroken’ with a fellow member of the cast. Douglas plays his grandfather, Clarence Douglas, in the movie.
Special to the MDJ
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Clarence Douglas in 1943, was a flight engineer, a gunner and master sergeant in the Army Air Corps who flew on a B-24 Liberator, a bomber plane, during World War II.
Clarence Douglas in 1943, was a flight engineer, a gunner and master sergeant in the Army Air Corps who flew on a B-24 Liberator, a bomber plane, during World War II.
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Clarence Douglas and his wife, Suzanne, in east Cobb in the 1990s
Clarence Douglas and his wife, Suzanne, in east Cobb in the 1990s
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Douglas, a camera operator living in Brooklyn, New York, stands with the director of ‘Unbroken,’ Angelina Jolie
Douglas, a camera operator living in Brooklyn, New York, stands with the director of ‘Unbroken,’ Angelina Jolie
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MARIETTA — The movie “Unbroken,” released in theaters today, features a man playing the role of his grandfather, a World War II veteran and Marietta resident. The movie tells the true war story of Louis Zamperini, who survived for 47 days on a raft after his B-24 crashed into the ocean and later endured torture by the Japanese. Lyn Paddrik, who has lived in east Cobb since 1973, said her late father, Clarence Douglas, was a part of Zamperini’s story in 1943. Douglas died in 1993 of lung cancer and is buried in the Marietta National Cemetery. Clarence Douglas’ grandson, Stephen Douglas, was cast to play his grandfather in the movie. Clarence Douglas served in the Army Air Corps and took part in the dangerous mission over the South Pacific in World War II featured in the movie. He was a master sergeant, a flight engineer and gunner. The movie is based on Laura Hillenbrand’s book, “Unbroken,” which portrays Clarence Douglas as a hero. In 1943, Zamperini and Clarence Douglas were flying in a B-24 Liberator to bomb the island Naru. After they bombed the island, Japanese planes began firing at the plane, and Clarence Douglas shot down the last Japanese plane, Paddrik said. “He was very injured, but he crawled up and was able to shoot down the last Japanese plane,” Paddrik said. The B-24 was shot more than 500 times, according to a newspaper article recalling the mission published in 1943, but all the crew members lived. After that mission, Douglas was sent to a hospital, but Zamperini was assigned to another crew and another mission, which later lead to the series of events — the plane crash and Zamperini’s survival — detailed in the book. Paddrik said when she read the book in 2011 and saw her father mentioned, she was shocked. The book’s tale was the only war story about her father she’d ever heard because he never talked about his experiences, Paddrik said. “I didn’t have any clue about my father’s history,” she said. Clarence Douglas’s son, Tom, who lives in Delaware, said he was never able to get his father to tell him about his time in the war, either. The son said when he would ask his father about it, Clarence Douglas would reply: “You never want to know about war.” “And that was it. He would never talk about it — very humble man,” Tom Douglas said. Both of Clarence Douglas’ children were surprised by what they learned from the book. Tom Douglas was so intrigued that he sent an email to Hillenbrand after her book was released, and the two soon began corresponding about his father. Just as Tom Douglas wanted to know more about his father’s experiences during the war, Hillenbrand wanted to know more about what the WWII veteran did afterward. Clarence Douglas had been badly injured in that last mission with Zamperini, so he was sent to a hospital in Samoa, an island country in the South Pacific, to recover. He was awarded the Purple Heart and an Air Medal for meritorious achievement while in flight, with Oak Leaf Clusters for repeated acts of heroism, Paddrik said. After he recovered, he began a career at Western Electric in Baltimore and had two children, Lyn and Tom, with his wife, Suzanne. Paddrik said she remembers her father as a loving man. He and his wife moved to Marietta in 1984 to be near their family. “My father was a true Southern gentlemen,” Paddrik said. “He was a man of principle but had a very gentle way about him. He could fix anything, loved old people and little children, could keep a secret and was the confidant of many, even outside his family.” Paddrik said her father had scars from the war, but would never talk about them. Her father’s skin was speckled with black spots, which she later learned were small pieces of shrapnel that doctors had never bothered to remove. Hillenbrand spoke at length with Tom Douglas about his father’s story. When Tom Douglas learned from Hillenbrand that she had sold the movie rights for the book, which was set to be directed by Angelina Jolie, he immediately thought of his son. Stephen Douglas, who works as a camera operator in Brooklyn, New York, was pushed by his father to audition for the part, and he agreed to his father’s request even though he saw himself as more of a “behind the camera man.” Soon, word came back from producers of the movie that Jolie was interested in having a character’s grandson play the role in the movie, and Stephen got the part. Tom Douglas said he’s thankful the movie was made, even though his son will play only a very small role, because it gave Stephen Douglas the opportunity to learn more about war heroes and his grandfather’s experiences. Clarence Douglas, known as “Pop Pop” to his grandchildren, would have been happy to see his legacy live on, Tom Douglas said. Members of the Douglas family intend to continue commemorating their family war hero by going to the theaters to see “Unbroken” this week.
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MUST Ministries ensures families get happy holidays
by Ricky Leroux
December 25, 2014 04:00 AM | 463 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
MUST Ministries Kitchen Coordinator Lavon Minns and Volunteer Coordinator Virginia Standifer prepare ingredients for a black beans and rice dish at the Loaves and Fish Community Kitchen on Wednesday for MUST’s Christmas Day lunch. <br>Staff- Justin Larson
MUST Ministries Kitchen Coordinator Lavon Minns and Volunteer Coordinator Virginia Standifer prepare ingredients for a black beans and rice dish at the Loaves and Fish Community Kitchen on Wednesday for MUST’s Christmas Day lunch.
Staff- Justin Larson
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MARIETTA — MUST Ministries is doing all it can to help families have a good holiday season this year, including giving away more than 3,000 toys, giving shelter to as many people as it can and serving a big holiday lunch today which is open to anyone who is hungry. The toy shops were open from Dec. 8 to Tuesday, and in that time, MUST has given toys to 3,830 children: 2,509 in Cobb County and 1,321 in Cherokee. Kaye Cagle, director of marketing and public relations for MUST, said it’s “unbelievable” this many children will have a good Christmas because of the toy shops. “It’s really exciting to me that our community supports so many children — that they’re that generous — because everything at the toy shop is new and everything is donated.” Every child gets two or three toys, Cagle said, as well as a blanket, a hat, gloves, a scarf, underwear, a family game, school supplies and a stocking with toiletries and small toys. “We even give wrapping paper to the parents, so that they can go home and wrap them,” Cagle said. Ike Reighard, president and CEO of MUST, said the toy shop is one of the nonprofit’s signature programs. “We’re just thrilled to help people have some presents under the tree for their children because I can’t imagine a more helpless and hopeless feeling than not being able to provide for your kids and Christmas morning rolling around and not having something there,” Reighard said. Reighard said the toy shop gets its inventory through donations from businesses, some of which organize toy drives on behalf of MUST, as well as individuals dropping off toys. “We just kind of put the word out through our network,” he said. “MUST is blessed to have over 8,000 active volunteers in our database, so when we put the word out on something through social media or direct email contact, we just have a great network of people. So rather than it just being some huge burden on someone, we’re able to use a lot of people.” MUST is also working to give as many people as it can a warm place to sleep on Christmas. MUST operates at about 98 percent occupancy year-round, Reighard said. While MUST’s Elizabeth Inn shelter can take in 65 people, the nonprofit also has transitional housing for about 100 more people. Reighard said if the weather drops below freezing, MUST can open a “warming shelter,” which he said can take in about 20 people. MUST can also open its Loaves and Fishes Kitchen to give even more people a place to stay for the night. “Especially on Christmas Day, because they’re the people who live in the woods and the other places, and we just want them to have a place where they can go and have a warm meal on a day that means so much to so many. … The first Christmas started with a full inn, and it’s certainly something that we’re used to experiencing at the Elizabeth Inn, but we try to give the innkeeper a better name and take in everyone that we can on that night,” Reighard said. At the Elizabeth Inn, located just off Cobb Parkway near the Canton Road connector, everyone will get gifts on Christmas morning, Cagle said. “We’ve been out shopping,” she said. “A lot of people to buy for, but what a blessing. And then we have a lot of people come by the donation center to give things to folks.” The Elizabeth Inn provides a six-week program to those who are homeless. The residents are given a bed for the six weeks and three meals each day and are given help finding permanent housing and employment. Reighard said MUST always has plenty of volunteers to help during the holiday season. “This time of year, we’re more overwhelmed than any other time of year with people who want to come in and volunteer. We have no shortage of volunteers during the holidays. I think it’s just because it’s more on people’s hearts and minds,” Reighard said. Cagle said MUST does more than work with the homeless, though that is what the nonprofit is most known for. “We take care of 31,000 people a year, and about 1,200 of them are homeless,” Cagle said. “And people get kind of confused about MUST and think that that’s all we do, is take care of the homeless. And we do take care of the homeless, and they are part of the heart and soul of MUST, but we also take care of another almost 30,000 that are in poverty that are not homeless. It’s a huge outreach to people in need.”
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Doggone purr-fect ending!
December 25, 2014 04:00 AM | 483 views | 0 0 comments | 23 23 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Otis the Labrador is quite content in his easy chair at his new home with his fellow pet, Milo the Cat. Both were adopted by David and Laurel Boles after the two were found alongside the highway in Lawrenceville. <br>Staff-Kelly J. Huff
Otis the Labrador is quite content in his easy chair at his new home with his fellow pet, Milo the Cat. Both were adopted by David and Laurel Boles after the two were found alongside the highway in Lawrenceville.
Staff-Kelly J. Huff
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Otis gives his hero Milo a friendly lick as they lounge around the house.
Otis gives his hero Milo a friendly lick as they lounge around the house.
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Otis the Labrador and Milo the Cat have come a long way as they prepare to celebrate their first Christmas in a warm, loving home with their new owners David and Laurel Boles in Atlanta.
Otis the Labrador and Milo the Cat have come a long way as they prepare to celebrate their first Christmas in a warm, loving home with their new owners David and Laurel Boles in Atlanta.
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MARIETTA — It sounds like something straight from a movie. A homeless kitten made friends with a homeless puppy before they were found and given a permanent home. Melissa Baxter of Marietta said the pair was brought to her by a “concerned citizen” who picked them up on her way into Marietta. Baxter said they were “wandering in the freezing rain, cold and skinny.” “They are attached at the hip, and inspect, play and sleep together,” Baxter said. “We don’t know their back story or where their adventure has taken them together. We also don’t know how long they have been together, but it is apparent from their bond that they are in love and Otis follows Milo’s every lead.” She took the animals into her home, named them Milo and Otis after the famous movie duo, and set about finding them a home via social media. Baxter even set up a fundraising account — www.gofundme.com/i582vs — to help find the pair a home. As of press time, $465 had been raised to help pay for medical expenses, such as shots. Baxter said she posted on Facebook that the pair was up for adoption on Dec. 1 and was immediately contacted by Laurel and David Boles of Atlanta. After an interview and home inspection, Milo and Otis were taken to the Boles’ home on Dec. 5, where they now live. Baxter said Otis, a lab mix, was only 13 weeks old and Milo, a standard tabby, was six months old when they were adopted, so she wanted to make sure the Boles were ready for the job of raising the pair. “Most people don’t realize the extensive work and training it takes to acclimate a new puppy to your home,” she said. “Fortunately for us, Laurel and David were experienced pet owners and had glowing references from vets and trainers, so we knew we had found the perfect match.” Laurel Boles said the pair are enjoying their new life. “They are perfectly happy and spoiled,” Boles said. They may not be as inseparable as they once were, but Boles said they still spend time together. “I think now that Otis has started to feel more comfortable at home, he goes after Milo more often,” Boles said. “I think it’s a jealousy thing (and) I think once he gets over the puppy phase, it might be a little bit different.” The story gained so much popularity on Facebook that Baxter even received a message from Mark Saltzman, who wrote the screenplay for the movie, “The Adventures of Milo and Otis.” “What a heart-lifting story to read! About you taking in the lost dog and cat, finding them a home but first naming them Milo and Otis,” he wrote. “My heart is especially lifted, since I have a rescue dog of my own … It’s thanks to my Google alert for bringing your kind deed to my computer screen here in California.” As for the pair’s names, Laurel Boles said they will forever be known as Milo and Otis, especially since they’ve become somewhat famous. “I’ve been told I cannot change them,” she said, laughing. Baxter owns Back by Popular Demand, a women’s consignment store in east Cobb off Johnson Ferry Road, and has been taking in strays for about 13 years after she found one in her apartment complex. “I reached out to find help and realized that there are thousands of dumped animals, and the shelters were packed and having to euthanize animals daily,” she said. She said while she doesn’t run an animal shelter, she tries to help as many stray animals as possible through her store’s Facebook page, which has about 18,000 “likes.” She posts photos of animals up for adoption on the page alongside clothes, purses and shoes. “You know, to break up the fashion,” she said. Baxter said the Christmas season and the Fourth of July are the worst times of the year for shelters and animals. “It’s heartbreaking that people clean up their homes and discard their pets on holidays to make room for guests or because they don’t want the headache,” she said. Michelle Kirkman co-chairs the adoption committee for Good Mews, a nonprofit, no-kill cat shelter headquartered at 736 Johnson Ferry Road in Marietta. Kirkman said while it varies from year to year, the holiday season is a busy time of the year for adoptions. “It’s very unpredictable, but I would say we’re not slower,” she said. “Either the same or busier. People are in the spirit of bringing home a cat for Christmas.” She said it is a good time for people to adopt as well, because people typically have more time at home to better help the new animal get used to the people and the new home. However, she cautioned against adopting an animal as a gift for someone else because the person receiving the animal should be the one picking out the animal. “Everybody has different tastes of what they like,” she explained. Baxter also said a pet should not be a present. “A pet is a responsibility for the length of their life and deserves the acknowledgment of responsibility from those who are looking to adopt it,” Baxter said.
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Georgia Sports Writers Association All-State Football Team
December 25, 2014 12:05 AM | 479 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Georgia Sports Writers Association All-State Football Team All-Classification Player of the Year: AJ Gray, Washington County, Sr. Class AAAAAA Offensive Player of the Year: Sihiem King, Colquitt County, Sr. Defensive Player of the Year: Julian Rochester, McEachern, Jr. Coach of the Year: Rush Propst, Colquitt County First team Offense QB Bailey Hockman, McEachern, Soph., 6-3, 215 RB Sihiem King, Colquitt County, Sr., 5-8, 172 RB Tyray Devezin, Etowah, Soph., 5-9, 170 REC T.J. Rahming, McEachern, Sr., 5-9, 160 REC Preston Williams, Lovejoy, Sr., 6-3, 185 REC Kyle Davis, Archer, Jr., 6-3, 220 OL Mitch Hyatt, North Gwinnett, Sr., 6-6, 280 OL Alfred Brown, Colquitt County, Sr., 6-4, 260 OL Chuma Edoga, McEachern, Sr., 6-3, 280 OL Brad Morgan, Etowah, Sr., 6-5, 270 OL Kaleb Kim, Mill Creek, Sr., 6-4, 280 K Alex Barbir, South Forsyth, Jr., 5-9, 185 ATH Kylil Carter, South Cobb, Sr., 5-11, 210 Defense DL Julian Rochester, McEachern, Jr., 6-6, 285 DL Scott Morgan, Etowah, Sr., 6-5, 277 DL D’Andre Walker, Lan. Hughes, Sr., 6-3, 220 DL Justin Young, Grayson, Sr., 6-4, 265 LB Bull Barge, Colquitt County, Sr, 5-11, 215 LB Quarte Sapp, Milton, Sr., 6-2, 215 LB Adonis Thomas, Cent. Gwinnett, Sr., 6-4, 220 LB Montavious Atkinson, Lan. Hughes, Sr., 6-1, 205 DB Dylan Singleton, Archer, Jr., 5-11, 185 DB Stuart Head, Etowah, Soph., 6-4, 185 DB Josh Norwood, Valdosta, Sr., 6-0, 165 DB Isaiah Pryor, Archer, Jr., 6-2, 190 P Ian Shannon, Marietta, Sr., 6-4, 190 RET Malik Henry, Tift County, Sr., 6-0, 175 Second team Offense QB John Urzua, North Gwinnett, Sr., 6-3, 175 RB Delvin Weems, Tucker, Sr., 5-9, 195 RB Sheldon Evans, Roswell, Soph., 5-10, 205 REC Andrew Harris, Cherokee, Sr., 6-1, 180 REC Tyler Smith, McEachern, Soph., 5-10, 170 REC Josh Imatorbhebhe, N. Gwinnett, Jr., 6-2, 200 OL Max Kemper, Pope, Sr., 6-4, 300 OL Nick Wilson, Milton, Sr., 6-2, 290 OL Trey Derouen, Parkview, Sr., 6-4, 309 OL Tavares Tate, Westlake, Jr., 6-2, 280 OL Chris Barnes, Lee County, Jr., 6-4, 285 K Ethan Suda, Milton, Jr., 5-11, 175 ATH Brittain Brown, Cherokee, Jr., 6-1, 190 Defense DL Nick Steinhaus, Milton, Sr., 6-0, 230 DL Jamaal Angrish, Westlake, Sr., 6-1, 215 DL Andrew Butcher, Alpharetta, Sr., 6-3, 250 DL Robbie Armstrong, Archer, Sr., 6-0, 245 LB Michael Bean, Cherokee, Sr., 6-2, 225 LB Quintin Hampton, Colquitt Co., Sr., 5-11, 225 LB Mohamed Barry, Grayson, Sr., 6-2, 220 LB Quinn Miller, Archer, Soph., 6-1, 220 DB Nigel Warrior, Westlake, Jr., 6-2, 190 DB C.J. Mayes, Dacula, Sr., 5-8, 175 DB Duke Shelley, Tucker, Sr., 5-9, 160 DB Kenyan Houston, Lan. Hughes, Sr., 5-9, 170 P Austin McGuigan, Grayson, Jr., 6-1, 230 RET Jeremy Johnson, Lambert, Sr., 5-10, 170 Honorable mentions: WR Major Bellamy, Central Gwinnett, Jr.; DB Montrell Custis, Lovejoy, Sr.; ATH Daniel David, Mill Creek, Sr.; LB Daniel Fennell, Grayson, Sr.; RB Sonny Harris, Hillgrove, Sr.; REC Daniel Imatorbhebhe, North Gwinnett, Sr.; QB Romario Johnson, Newton, Jr.; QB Austin King, Alpharetta, Sr.; RB Tyler LaFlamme, South Forsyth, Sr.; LB Tre’ Lamar, Roswell, Jr.; DL Jonathan Ledbetter, Tucker, Sr.; QB Garet Morrell, Lee County, Jr.; QB Chase Parrish, Colquitt County, Jr.; QB Tyler Queen, North Cobb, Sr.; DB Dejon Rowe, Alpharetta, Jr.; DL Anree Saint-Amour, North Gwinnett, Sr.; QB Gabe Tiller, Archer, Sr.; ATH Jamyest Williams, Archer, Soph.; DL Maurice Williams, Tucker, Sr.; QB Matthew Wilson, Hillgrove, Jr. Class AAAAA Offensive Player of the Year: Jake Fromm, Houston County, Soph. Defensive Player of the Year: Natrez Patrick, Mays, Sr. Coach of the Year: Kevin Kinsler, Northside-Warner Robins First team Offense QB Jake Fromm, Houston Co., Soph., 6-2, 215 RB Russell Halimon, Allatoona, Jr., 5-9, 185 RB Willie Jordan, Northside-WR, Sr., 6-1, 230 REC Darion Anderson, Houston Co., Jr., 6-1, 170 REC Nick Singleton, Jones Co., Soph., 5-10, 175 REC Chris Williamson, Gainesville, Sr., 6-1, 187 OL Brandon Sandifer, Northside-WR, Sr., 6-5, 300 OL Dallas Warmack, Mays, Sr., 6-5, 305 OL Venzell Boulware, Creekside, Sr., 6-3, 295 OL Bailey Sharp, Sprayberry, Sr., 6-5, 292 OL Cole Minshew, Coffee, Sr., 6-6, 320 K Justin Alonso, Northside-WR, Jr., 5-10, 160 ATH TaQuon Marshall, Harris Co., Sr., 5-10, 167 Defense DL Derrick Brown, Lanier, Jr., 6-4, 285 DL Torrez Finney, Jones County, Jr., 5-8, 205 DL Natrez Patrick, Mays, Sr., 6-2, 260 DL Chauncey Rivers, Stephenson, Sr., 6-2, 255 LB Bryson Armstrong, Kell, Jr., 5-11, 190 LB Mekhi Brown, Carver-Columbus, Sr., 6-6, 220 LB Will Kemp, Allatoona, Sr., 5-10, 180 LB J.D. Sosebee, Gainesville, Sr., 6-0, 220 DB Stefan Ball, Lanier, Sr., 5-10, 170 DB Aaron Williams, Carver-Atlanta, Sr., 6-0, 185 DB Steven Houzah, Lakeside-Evans, Sr., 5-10, 170 DB Khalil Brooks, Mays, Sr., 5-11, 185 P Rodrigo Blankenship, Sprayberry, Sr., 6-1, 190 RET Isaac Zico, Alexander, Sr., 6-2, 185 Second team Offense QB Mikey Gonzalez, Gainesville, Sr., 5-10, 185 RB Tae Crowder, Harris County, Sr., 6-3, 220 RB Marquis Terry, Drew, Sr., 5-8, 175 REC Jalen Wilkerson, Coffee, Sr., 6-4, 230 REC Jai Creamer, Rome, Jr., 6-4, 215 REC Zach Nichols, Allatoona, Sr., 6-0, 186 OL Quentin Stanford, Northside-WR, Sr., 6-2, 310 OL Trey Perkins, Jones County, Sr., 6-4, 300 OL Darius Anderson, Mundy’s Mill, Sr., 6-3, 300 OL Conor Brumfield, Allatoona, Sr., 6-4, 235 OL Benaiah Everett, Ware County, Sr., 6-0, 270 K Jordan Strevig, Houston County, Sr., 6-1, 185 ATH Jawon Pass, Carver-Columbus, Jr., 6-5, 225 Defense DL Isaiah Johnson, Northside-WR, Sr., 6-5, 290 DL Charles Wiley, Stockbridge, Jr., 6-4, 237 DL Trae Philpots, Creekside, Sr., 6-2, 230 DL Jonathan Greenard, Hiram, Sr., 6-4, 220 LB Tobias Little, Mays, Jr., 6-1, 230 LB Joshua Moon, Creekside, Sr., 6-0, 185 LB Mike McCain, Kell, Jr., 5-11, 195 LB Jay Lott, Coffee, Sr., 5-10, 192 DB Sammy Burley, Ware County, Sr., 6-1, 183 DB Rayshawn McCall, Clarke Central, Jr., 5-9, 165 DB Tae Daley, Northside-WR, Soph., 5-10, 170 DB Marquez Callaway, Warner Robins, Jr., 6-3, 180 P Shawn Davis, Union Grove, Sr., 6-3, 210 RET Meco Jackson, Miller Grove, Sr., 5-9, 170 Honorable mentions: QB Asahnia Aderhold, Mays, Sr.; OL Nick Buchanan, Dunwoody, Sr.; WR DeParis Carter, Mays, Sr.; DL Rosheem Collins, Ware County, Sr.; DL Titus Davis, Stockbridge; RB CeCe Green, Winder-Barrow, Jr.; OL Marquel Harrell, Creekside, Sr.; QB Bradley Hunnicutt, Jones County, Sr.; QB Conner Larson, Allatoona, Sr.; RB Artemus Mitchell, Stockbridge, Sr.; QB Brian Moore, Cambridge, Sr.; ATH Joseph Newman, Drew, Jr.; DB Kameron Pena, Allatoona, Sr.; RB Tyler Pippins, Ola, Sr.; WR L.J. Pope, South Paulding, Jr.; DL Stephone Raybon, Warner Robins, Sr.; OL Steven Robinet, Houston County, Sr.; QB Cameron Rosendahl, Kell, Sr.; WR Justin Strozier, Woodland-Stockbridge, Sr.; QB Peyton Veraldi, Dalton, Sr. Class AAAA Offensive Player of the Year: Kawon Bryant, North Oconee, Sr. Defensive Player of the Year: Trenton Thompson, Westover, Sr. Coach of the Year: Jess Simpson, Buford First team Offense QB Trevor Lawrence, Cartersville, Fr., 6-3, 180 RB Kawon Bryant, North Oconee, Sr., 5-9, 205 RB Shannon Brooks, Pickens, Sr., 5-10, 200 REC Justin Smith, West Laurens, Sr., 6-6, 200 REC Keyston Fuller, Griffin, Sr., 5-11, 175 REC Terrius Callahan, Cartersville, Jr., 6-0, 160 OL Nick Polino, Buford, Sr., 6-4, 270 OL E.J. Hurley, Sandy Creek, Sr., 6-2, 325 OL Hunter Holland, Buford, Sr., 6-3, 280 OL Sage Hardin, Marist, Sr., 6-6, 260 OL Chad Nelson, St. Pius X, Jr., 6-3, 250 K Joey Gogol, Marist, Sr., 6-0, 180 ATH Eric Swinney, Sandy Creek, Sr., 5-10, 185 Defense DL Shug Frazier, Buford, Jr., 6-3, 320 DL Kenneth Brinson, Marist, Sr., 6-3, 220 DL Trenton Thompson, Westover, Sr., 6-4, 300 DL Ben Cleveland, Stephens County, Jr., 6-6, 325 LB Joshua Thomas, Buford, Sr., 5-11, 200 LB Tyler Reed, Cartersville, Jr., 6-2, 225 LB Max Richardson, Woodward Acad., Jr., 6-0, 225 LB Austin Smith, Buford, Sr., 6-3, 230 DB Richard LeCounte, Liberty Co., Soph., 6-0, 160 DB David Curry, Buford, Sr., 6-1, 195 DB Keri Brown, Mary Persons, Sr., 5-8, 180 DB Arrington Farrar, Woodward Acad., Sr., 6-2, 200 P Cristian Ramirez, Carrollton, Sr., 6-1, 200 RET Elijah Holyfield, Woodward Acad., Jr., 5-11, 200 Second team Offense QB Anforne Stroud, Griffin, Sr., 6-0, 185 RB Kentavious Thomas, Baldwin, Sr., 5-10, 205 RB Malik Miller, Griffin, Sr., 5-10, 200 REC Antonio Gibson, Eagle’s Landing, Jr., 6-2, 200 REC Isaac Nauta, Buford, Jr., 6-5, 240 REC Christian Owens, Griffin, Sr., 6-5, 215 OL Chandler Tuitt, Sandy Creek, Jr., 6-4, 275 OL Brackin Smith, North Oconee, Sr., 6-3, 262 OL Tyler Camp, Mary Persons, Sr., 6-3, 290 OL Brodarious Hamm, Spalding, Jr., 6-5, 315 OL Mitch Mathes, Troup, Sr., 6-3, 290 K Bryan Villa, Northwest Whitfield, Sr., 5-6, 150 ATH Kalin Heath, Cartersville, Sr., 6-3, 185 Defense DL Brandon Berry, Griffin, Sr., 6-5, 230 DL Demarcus Davis, Mary Persons, Sr., 6-2, 225 DL Arthur Holmes, Eastside, Sr., 6-1, 225 DL DL Quay Picou, Buford, Sr., 6-3, 287 LB Matthew Turner, West Laurens, Sr., 5-10, 180 LB Jeremiah Littles, Wayne County, Jr., 6-2, 225 LB Ian Hayes, Ridgeland, Sr., 6-2, 220 LB Trent Sellers, Sandy Creek, Sr., 6-4, 230 DB Ernest Harris, TCC, Sr., 6-2, 180 DB Zantravious Shields, N. Oconee, Sr., 5-10, 185 DB Brian O’Reilly, St. Pius X, Sr., 6-0, 180 DB Javon Jackson, Sandy Creek, Jr., 5-11, 180 P Hunter Roberson, Wayne County, Sr., 6-0, 200 RET Victor Bodison, Bainbridge, Sr., 5-8, 145 Honorable mentions: WR Malik Bledsoe, Mary Persons, Sr.; RB Darius Bradford, West Laurens, Soph.; QB Andre Brown, Columbia, Sr.; DL Austin Bryant, Thomas County Central, Sr.; DB Cole Coker, North Oconee, Sr.; DB Aaron Dore, Eagle’s Landing, Sr.; ATH Wesley Fields, Americus-Sumter, Sr.; TE Cameron Fannon, St. Pius X, Sr.; LB Marcus Gaines, Cairo, Sr.; ATH Xavier Gantt, Buford, Jr.; RB Jeremiah Hill, Cairo, Sr.; OL Jake Ingram, Gilmer, Sr.; RB Anfernee Jordan, Wayne County, Sr.; QB Mason Long, Stephens County, Sr.; QB Cameron Maddox, Locust Grove, Jr.; QB Garrel Quainton, Warner Robins, Sr.; QB Jes Sutherland, Woodward Academy, Sr.; DL Malik Taylor, Cairo, Jr.; RB Christian Wafford, Whitewater, Sr.; ATH Dalton Wilson, St. Pius X, Sr. Class AAA Offensive Player of the Year: Kaelan Riley, Calhoun, Jr. Defensive Player of the Year: Will Coneway, Washington County, Sr. Coach of the Year: Hal Lamb, Calhoun First team Offense QB Kaelan Riley, Calhoun, Jr., 6-4, 205 RB Labron Morris, Cedar Grove, Jr., 5-10, 185 RB Devyn Collins, Pepperell, Jr., 5-7, 180 REC Dalton Hill, Jefferson, Sr., 6-1, 175 REC Orenzo Smith, Maynard Jackson, Jr., 6-1, 175 REC TJ Skelton, Jefferson, Sr., 6-1, 185 OL Ken Allen, Elbert County, Sr., 6-1, 280 OL Jack Defoor, Calhoun, Jr., 6-4, 260 OL Caleb Chandler, Jefferson, Soph., 6-4, 280 OL Cody McPeek, Fannin County, Sr., 6-4, 320 OL Will Bryan, Franklin County, Sr., 6-3, 280 K Bradley Hodgson, West Hall, Sr., 5-11, 170 ATH AJ Gray, Washington County, Sr., 6-2, 220 Defense DL Logan Hunt, Washington County, Sr., 6-0, 230 DL Antwaun Jackson, Cedar Grove, Jr., 6-4, 240 DL Marterious Allen, Hart County, Sr., 6-2, 250 DL Michail Carter, Jackson, Jr., 6-3, 310 LB Will Coneway, Washington Co., Sr., 5-11, 200 LB Austin Bennett, Calhoun, Sr., 6-0, 185 LB Pat Jasinski, Blessed Trinity, Sr., 6-2, 200 LB Jireh Wilson, Calhoun, Jr., 6-1, 200 DB Tyrique McGhee, Peach County, Jr., 5-11, 175 DB Will Conley, Calhoun, Sr., 6-0, 190 DB Cam Young, Dodge County, Jr., 6-1, 185 DB Tradd Porter, Jefferson, Sr., 6-0, 180 P Anthony Lotti, West Hall, Jr., 6-1, 190 RET Terry Godwin, Callaway, Sr., 6-0, 170 Second team Offense QB Evan Shirreffs, Jefferson, Sr., 6-6, 197 RB Eddie Culpepper, Callaway, Sr., 5-11, 180 RB Zay Malcome, Westminster, Soph., 5-3, 150 REC Anthony Turner, Hart County, Jr., 6-3, 200 REC Jailyn Ingram, Morgan County, Jr., 6-5, 220 REC Terrell Carter, Pierce County, Sr., 5-6, 145 OL Jacoby Jackson, Lumpkin County, Sr., 6-4, 290 OL Clifford Bouza, Peach County, Sr., 5-8, 195 OL Robert Walters, Maynard Jackson, Sr., 6-4, 295 OL Tobias Hagins, Appling County, Sr., 6-3, 280 OL Emmanuel Lemon, Kendrick, Jr., 6-3, 320 K Mitchell Rostowsky, Blessed Trinity, Sr., 6-4, 165 ATH Kwon Williams, West Hall, Jr., 6-0, 180 Defense DL Max Whitlock, Central-Carrollton, Jr., 5-11, 210 DL Quint Nash, Central-Macon, Sr., 6-0, 235 DL Landon Rice, Calhoun, Sr., 6-5, 255 DL James Traylor, Cook, Sr., 5-11, 300 LB Jaleel Laguins, Oconee County, Jr., 6-2, 210 LB Garrett Dupuis, Blessed Trinity, Jr., 6-0, 205 LB Charlie Trense, Westminster, Sr., 6-0, 200 LB Caleb Turner, Pierce County, Sr., 6-0, 191 DB Marquez Sanford, Westside-Macon, Sr., 5-11, 170 DB Vincente Thompkins, Laney, Jr., 6-0, 170 DB Mecole Hardman, Elbert County, Jr., 5-11, 175 DB Kendrick Robinson, Jefferson, Sr., 5-9, 155 P Blake Gillikin, Westminster, Jr., 6-2, 190 RET Torrance Marable, Towers, Jr., 5-8, 170 Honorable mentions: ATH Marcus Childers, Adairsville, Sr.; QB Conor Davis, Blessed Trinity, Jr.; QB Cameron Fouch, Hart County, Sr.; ATH Josh Henderson, Pierce County, Sr.; RB Sidnee Johnson, Adairsville, Jr.; ATH Thomas Lester, Sr.; QB Jacob Lewis, Jackson County, Sr.; ATH Wesley Long, Central-Carrollton, Sr.; RB Keyshawn Lowe, Peach County, Sr.; QB Hinton McConkey, North Murray, Sr.; DB Malcolm Mitchell, Banks County, Sr.; DL Zach Morris, Ringgold, Sr.; DL Jacorey Polite, Jenkins, Sr.; RB Rantious Reed, Elbert County, Sr.; RB Milton Shelton, Blessed Trinity, Jr.; DL Mitch Tanner, Dodge County, Sr.; QB Devin Watson, East Hall, Sr.; LB Tim White, Elbert County, Sr.; RB Sammy Williams, Jefferson, Sr.; DL Dontae Wilson, Jefferson, Soph. Class AA Offensive Player of the Year: Brad Stewart, Benedictine Defensive Player of the Year: Roquan Smith, Macon County Coach of the Year: Danny Britt, Benedictine First team Offense QB Stevie Powers, Benedictine, Sr., 6-1, 175 RB Micah Abernathy, GAC, Sr., 6-1, 190 RB Duranta Dunson, Heard County, Sr., 5-9, 175 REC Exavius Medlock, Brooks Co., Sr., 5-11, 165 REC Darius Slayton, GAC, Sr., 6-2, 185 REC Brad Stewart, Benedictine, Sr., 6-2, 190 OL Levi Brown, Heard County, Sr., 6-4, 275 OL James Banister, Lamar County, Sr., 6-0, 250 OL Sanders Creech, Benedictine, Jr., 6-0, 230 OL Allen Robinson, Thomasville, Sr., 6-2, 248 OL Jose Yanez, Macon County, Sr., 6-2, 255 K Samuel Sloman, Pace Academy, Jr., 5-8, 175 ATH Gerald Morgan, Fitzgerald, Sr., 6-2, 190 Defense DL Arden Key, Hapeville Charter, Sr., 6-6, 230 DL Josh Eason, Vidalia, Sr., 5-11, 250 DL Tremond Ferrell, Washington-Wilkes, Sr., 6-1, 270 DL Anthony Trinh, Pace Academy, Jr., 6-2, 235 LB Roquan Smith, Macon County, Sr., 6-2, 210 LB Nathan McBride, Vidalia, Soph., 6-3, 215 LB Paul Carothers, GAC, Sr., 6-1, 225 LB Dax Bishop, Model, Sr., 5-11, 220 DB Jay Bowdry, Thomasville, Sr., 5-11, 184 DB Zach Scott, Benedictine, Sr., 5-11, 185 DB Charlie Woerner, Rabun County, Jr., 6-5, 220 DB Jordan Black, Vidalia, Sr., 6-1, 185 P Adam King, Benedictine, Soph., 5-10, 170 RET Drell Greene, Bacon County, Sr., 6-0, 185 Second team Offense QB Joseph Mancuso, Union County, Jr., 6-4, 200 RB Darnell Holland, Bowdon, Sr., 5-10, 175 RB Nakyle Watkins, Model, Sr., 5-10, 212 REC Justin Phan, Greater Atlanta Christian, Sr., 5-7, 140 REC Trey Graham, Fitzgerald, Sr., 5-11, 171 REC Will Geraghty, Lovett, Sr., 6-5, 230 OL Damien Kemp, Greene County, Sr., 6-6, 290 OL Kaleb Ogles, Coosa, Sr., 6-0, 300 OL Nikita Fair, Washington-Wilkes, Sr., 6-5, 290 OL Patrick Kearns, Darlington, Jr., 6-4, 260 OL Matthew Voyles, Benedictine, Sr., 5-10, 190 K Andres Aparico, Greene County, Sr., 5-9, 165 ATH Deshawn Waller, B.E.S.T. Academy, Sr., 5-11, 190 Defense DL Garrison Williams, Monticello, Sr., 6-1, 240 DL Phillip Burke, Benedictine, Sr., 6-0, 225 DL Matt Brown, Heard County, Jr., 6-3, 215 DL Demone Kemp, Greene County, Sr., 6-4, 270 LB Tyler Cooksey, GAC, Sr., 6-3, 225 LB Brooks Busby, Darlington, Sr., 6-0, 220 LB Chase Barnett, Union County, Sr., 5-11, 200 LB Daylan Williams, Jefferson County, Sr., 6-0, 220 DB Chris Marshall, Coosa, Sr., 5-9, 180 DB Tron Folsom, Bacon County, Sr., 6-2, 193 DB Brian Rhodes, Screven County, Sr., 5-5, 150 DB Kemble LaGuines, Washington-Wilkes, Jr., 6-2, 170 P Taylor Goettie, Oconee County, Soph., 5-10, 170 RET Maurio Moore, Chatt. County, Sr., 5-11, 180 Honorable mentions: QB Willie Candler, Lovett, Sr.; LB Tru’Self Cooper, Benedictine, Jr.; LB Joseph Daniels, Macon County, Sr.; RB Trey Edge, Darlington, Sr.; RB Isaiah Foster, Chattooga, Soph.; ATH Jermany Hawkins, Screven County, Jr.; WR Devontae Hudson, Macon County, Sr.; ATH John Kennedy, Benedictine, Soph.; RB J.D. King, Fitzgerald, Soph.; DL Bryson Lamboy, Coosa, Sr.; QB K’hari Lane, Macon County, Soph.; QB Davis Mills, Greater Atlanta Christian, Soph.; ATH Hakeem Montgomery, Temple, Sr.; LB Jack Muller, Benedictine, Sr.; TE Robert Muschamp, Darlington, Sr.; RB Desmond Parker, Pelham, Sr.; RB Daulton Pope, Bremen, Sr.; RB Juan Tucker, Lamar County, Jr.; DL Malik Walker, Macon County, Jr.; RB Justin Ware, Coosa, Jr. Class A Offensive Player of the Year: Dorian Walker, Mount Paran Christian Defensive Player of the Year: Nick Sbravati, Mount Paran Christian Coach of the Year: Mitch Jordan, Mount Paran Christian First team Offense QB Aaron Winchester, Mount Pisgah, Sr., 6-1, 175 RB Ruben Garnett, Aquinas, Sr., 5-10, 170 RB Dorian Walker, Mount Paran, Sr., 6-1, 182 REC Lorenzo Smothers, Marion County, Jr., 5-8, 165 REC Emoni Williams, Mount Paran, Sr., 5-7, 160 REC Ben Miller, Mount Pisgah, Sr., 5-10, 170 OL Ryan Meneely, ELCA, Sr., 6-2, 300 OL Zach Boyer, Commerce, Sr., 5-11, 255 OL Stephen Bedosky, Landmark, Jr., 6-3, 260 OL Rob Kraeling, Prince Avenue, Jr., 6-8, 250 OL Carter Smith, Mount Paran, Sr., 6-1, 235 K Colton Lichtenberg, Sav. Country Day, Sr., 5-10, 180 ATH Tra Minter, Schley County, Sr., 5-8, 190 Defense DL Will Evans, Aquinas, Jr., 6-2, 260 DL Devin Adams, Hawkinsville, Sr., 5-11, 235 DL Tyrone Riley, Calvary Day, Sr., 6-6, 230 DL Royce Owens, Hawkinsville, Sr., 6-1, 195 LB Chase Burdette, ELCA, Sr., 6-0, 215 LB Taylor Hardigree, Athens Christian, Sr., 6-0, 220 LB Nick Sbravati, Mount Paran, Sr., 6-0, 185 LB Jonathan Ward, Tattnall Square, Sr., 6-1, 210 DB DeAndre Bowman, Pacelli, Jr., 5-9, 170 DB Reed Massey, Mount Paran, Sr., 6-0, 175 DB Davis Reynolds, ELCA, Sr., 5-11, 191 DB A.J. Keene, Calvary Day, Sr., 5-9, 165 P Ben Holt, Brookstone, Sr., 6-0, 180 RET J.J. Battle, Tattnall Square, Sr., 5-8, 175 Second team Offense QB Liam Welch, Aquinas, Jr., 6-2, 185 RB Michael Sutton, ECI, Sr., 5-11, 185 RB Robert Heyward, Calvary Day, Sr., 6-0, 190 REC Zach Jones, Strong Rock, Sr., 5-10, 178 REC Jacob Harper, Hebron Christian, Sr., 6-0, 160 REC Kordell Braxton, Brookstone, Jr., 5-8, 170 OL Napoleon Williams, Aquinas, Sr., 6-1, 260 OL Chris Rehak, Pacelli, Sr., 6-1, 325 OL Cam Morgan, Irwin County, Sr., 6-3, 275 OL Phillip Dunn, Tattnall Square, Sr., 6-0, 240 OL Chandler Reeces, ELCA, Jr., 6-6, 250 K Justin Thompson, Aquinas, Sr., 5-10, 150 ATH Jakyron Young, Irwin County, Sr., 5-11, 166 Defense DL Chauncey Manac, Clinch County, Jr., 6-3, 230 DL Elester Shedrick, Calhoun County, Sr., 6-0, 245 DL Christian Rodgers, Tattnall Square, Soph., 6-0, 220 DL Derek Benoit, Commerce, Sr., 6-2, 250 LB Ben Davis, Pacelli, Jr., 6-1, 205 LB Anthony Jackson, Charlton County, Sr., 6-4, 210 LB Derrick Lawrence, Marion County, Sr., 6-3, 185 LB DJ Pollard, Irwin County, Jr., 5-5, 160 DB Mikal Marble, Pacelli, Jr., 6-4, 195 DB Cornelius Taylor, Claxton, Sr., 6-1, 185 DB Octavis Johnson, Clinch County, Sr., 6-0, 185 DB Daniel Lindsey, Aquinas, Sr., 5-9, 165 P Daniel Weaver, First Pres. Day, Jr., 6-3, 180 RET Quantavious Jones, Wilkinson Co., Sr., 5-11, 190 Honorable mentions: QB Jake Allen, Mount Paran, Sr.; OL Levi Cribb, Charlton County, Sr.; ATH A.J. Cummings, St. Francis, Sr.; ATH Jonah Doster, Prince Avenue Christian, Sr.; QB Dustin Eckert, Marion County, Sr.; RB Chanin Hamilton, Dooly County, Sr.; ATH Tyree Johnson, Atkinson County, Sr.; ATH Carson Leatherwood, Mount de Sales, Sr.; RB T.J. Lowe-Foston, Georgia Military College, Sr.; QB Stockton McGuire, Landmark Christian, Jr.; LB Gary McRae, Randolph-Clay, Sr.; LB Zack Ragle, Prince Avenue Christian, Jr.; LB Griffin Scott, Aquinas, Sr.; ATH Warren Singletary, Hawkinsville, Sr.; RB Lofton Tidwell, Landmark Christian, Soph.; RB Mathew Turner, Mt. Zion-Carroll, Sr.; ATH Jameson Vest, Our Lady of Mercy, Sr.; LB Jalen Wade, Lincoln County, Sr.; ATH O’Showen Williams, Stratford, Jr.; DL Keshun Wright, Hawkinsville, Sr.
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