MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at WWI, a bear, a gas leak, Lockheed, rapid transit, the Braves, a gold mine and the F-22.
October 25, 2014 04:00 AM | 86888 views | 0 0 comments | 2608 2608 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of Jan. 2
by Damon_Poirier
January 02, 2014 10:10 AM | 986 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
This week’s Time Capsule looks at a hunting accident, a C-130 Hercules landing, a freak snowstorm, Aunt Fanny’s Cabin and a healthcare merger.
 
100 years ago …
 
In Friday, Jan. 2, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that three teenage boys were rabbit hunting on a farm when one of the teens accidentally shot another fatally in the neck.
 
Also that week, it was reported that the cotton census for Cobb County reported 19,171 bales of cotton were ginned up to Dec. 13, 1913. The year before there were only 14,377 bales ginned.
 
50 years ago …
 
In the Friday, Dec. 27, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that students at Southern Technical Institute, now known as Southern Polytechnic State University, would be spending two-dollar bills to demonstrate the effect of the college community on the city of Marietta and surrounding Cobb County.
 
A four-car collision at the intersection of Bells Ferry and the Four-Lane, now known as U.S. Hwy. 41, was reported in the Sunday, Dec. 29, 1963 paper as having sent eight people to the hospital with injuries. Efforts to get a traffic light installed at the busy intersection had been unsuccessful for sometime and had resulted in a controversy between the state and county.
 
The Air Force announced in the Monday, Dec. 30, 1963 paper a $26 million increment to Lockheed-Georgia Company for the C-130E program. The increment was part of an overall $131 million Lockheed program for producing and equipping the C-130E.
 
In the Tuesday, Dec. 31, 1963 paper it was reported that the Navy Department in Washington confirmed that a Marietta-built C-130 Hercules made a successful landing on an aircraft carrier at sea. The landing was made on the flight deck of the super carrier Forrestal, but the Navy did not say when or where the landing took place.
 
Also that day, a ‘freak’ snowstorm was reported as blanketing the county and creating super-hazardous conditions for highways and street travel. The storm dumped more than an inch of snow on the county by noon that day and was predicted to continue snowing and sleeting for the rest of New Year’s eve.
 
Another story that day reported that Aunt Fanny’s Cabin, a nationally-known Cobb County restaurant, was out of business for the remainder of the holiday season after an early-morning fire that destroyed the kitchen. The Lemon-Vinings Fire Department received the fire report at 1:30 a.m. and reached the scene in time to contain the blames to the rear of the establishment with the greater part of the damage concentrated in the kitchen, boiler room and adjoining storeroom.
 
20 years ago …
 
In the Monday, Dec. 27, 1993 MDJ it was reported that the Cobb Community Transit announced it would launch the metro area’s first mass-transit program for the handicapped. Plans called for roughly 20,000 to 30,000 passengers in the first year. Memorial Day weekend was the target date for beginning the $1 million annual service. Fifteen min-busses that could accommodate wheelchairs were expected to arrive by late March or early April 1994.
 
Lottery vendors said in the Tuesday, Dec. 28, 1993 paper that the week’s record $15 million estimated jackpot had residents making a mad dash to their stores. The previous week’s $10 million jackpot, which had rolled over, resulted in the sale of 7.5 million ticket sales. The amount seems rather small compared to the recent $600-plus million Mega Millions jackpot.
 
The Cobb-based Northwest Georgia Health System, now known as WellStar Health System, and Atlanta’s 500-bed Piedmont Hospital were reported in the Thursday, Dec. 30, 1993 paper as beginning merger talks to create what would be the state’s largest healthcare network. In an alliance between the two healthcare organizations, open-heart surgery was expected to be included in the network because it was being performed at Piedmont. Currently, WellStar Health System is in a joint collaboration with Piedmont Healthcare of Atlanta to sell health insurance.
 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Dec. 26
by Damon_Poirier
December 26, 2013 11:00 AM | 846 views | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
This week’s Time Capsule looks at broken arms, a mayor’s salary, prayer and a limousine war.
 
100 years ago …
 
In Friday, Dec. 26, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that  following the resignation of Fulton National Bank of Atlanta vice president Julius Bashinski that former cashier A.B. Simms had taken his position. Also in the general shifting of positions, Ryburn Clay – son of the late Sen. A.S. Clay, was promoted to the position of assistant cashier. Clay’s promotion came as a wedding present since he was to be married the following week to a woman from Boston, Mass.
 
Also that week the front page reported three broken arms within four days. The first was a Marietta man broke his right arm while playing football in Atlanta, while two other Marietta men broke their right arms while cranking their automobiles.
 
50 years ago …
 
In the Friday, Dec. 20, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal, Sheriff Kermit Sanders was reported saying that the night watch man at the Crescent Park Skating Rink on Austell Road was found dead on the floor of the manager’s office with a large gash in the back of his head. The wound was presumed to be from a fall or a blow from a heavy instrument. Based on blood found on the walls in the restroom, authorities said that the incident happened there and the victim stumbled into the office. Sheriff Sanders said nothing was missing and robbery was ruled out as a possible cause for the death.
 
Also that day, Marietta Mayor-Elect Howard Atherton Jr. was reported as not being satisfied with the mayor’s salary and was going to ask for a reduction when he took office in January. Atherton wanted the pay cut from $616.67 per month to $300. The mayor’s duties were also being slashed. Keeping a campaign promise, Atherton’s administration switched over to a city manager form of government, where the city manager would take over all administrative duties. The mayor’s duties would now be to serve as the ceremonial representative of the city, preside over all city council meetings and serve as chairman of the City Board of Lights and Water.
 
The principal of Lucius D. Clay Elementary School was reported killed in the Monday, Dec. 23, 1963 paper in a wreck at Due West and Mars Hill Roads. He was the third fatality in the county in three weeks and the 32nd of the year. The wreck occurred when a 16-year-old driver skidded through a stop sign and struck the principal’s car. After being hit, the car went into a four-foot deep ditch, flipped once in the air and landed on its wheels. The principal’s four-year-old son survived the incident and was treated for head injuries and a broken leg at Kennestone Hospital.
 
In the Tuesday, Dec. 24, 1963 paper, it was reported that the creation of a new fire district in the Acworth area and expansion of five existing districts drew lop-sided voter approval in a series of referendums through Cobb County. Voting in the Gritters area failed to produce approval for a new fire district there. Last minute Christmas shopping, bad weather and icy roads were blamed for keeping voters away from the polls. A total of only 799 people cast ballots in the seven referendums.
 
20 years ago …
 
The American Civil Liberties Union was reported in the Tuesday, Dec. 21, 1993 MDJ as having threatened to sue Cobb and Henry counties unless their county commissioners halted long-time practices of praying before board meetings. Volunteer lawyers for the ACLU wrote Cobb Commission Chairman Bill Byrne on Dec. 13, threatening legal action if the board didn’t suspend “sectarian prayer at the beginning of each commission meeting.” ACLU volunteer attorney Kelly Brown, a first-year lawyer with an Atlanta publishing firm, said in letters to Byrne that county money used for prayers at commission meetings was unconstitutional. She cited as examples the county’s validation of parking tickets for visiting ministers who deliver the prayer and sending thank-you notes to them on official county stationary. The following day, it was reported that Cobb’s five commissioners said they would oppose any efforts by the ACLU to stop prayer before board meetings and that they believed the ACLU did not have the right to tell them if they could pray before meetings.
 
In the Thursday, Dec. 23, 1993 paper, it was reported that Cobb commissioners said they were ready to launch a counter-attack against Atlanta in what had been termed a metro-area “limousine war.” Cobb and several other metro area governments had lost patience with the “aggressive tactics” of the Atlanta Bureau of Taxicabs and Vehicles for Hire. Their impatience was fueled by the passage of the Atlanta City Council’s ordinance requiring out-of-city limousine companies to pay between $650 and $750 per car and driver for licenses to operate within Atlanta’s city limits. Cobb officials were reported as talking quietly with Gwinnett and Clayton counties along with several municipalities about establishing a limousine-services zone that would provide competitive advantages to companies based within it – at the expense of Atlanta-based limo businesses.
 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Dec. 19
by Damon_Poirier
December 17, 2013 10:30 AM | 991 views | 2 2 comments | 30 30 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a monument, a nuclear reactor, a maiden flight, padlocking, the Marietta City Club and Kennestone Hospital.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Dec. 19, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that the State of Illinois had appropriated $20,000 for the erection of a Georgia marble monument on Cheatham Hill, three miles from Marietta, in memory of the Illinois troops that took part in the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain during the Civil War. The Confederates were entrenched on Cheatham Hill when the Northern troops advanced. The fighting was terrible, lasting six days and nights with soldiers almost within gun’s reach of each other. After the sixth day, the Northern troops dug a 50 yard tunnel underneath the Confederates and planned to blow them up as a Fourth of July celebration.

Also that week there was a half-page sized ad on the front from the T.L. Wallace Clothing Co. titled, “A Few Suggestions for Christmas.” The ad offered underwear, shirts, handkerchiefs, gloves, neckwear, silk hose and silk garters all for $1.

50 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 13, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that a pre-dawn blaze, believed to be arson, gutted three stores in a building on Acworth’s Main Street. The building was occupied by the Model Cleaners, the Simco Loan Company and the Hubert H. Hunter Barber Shop. Acworth Police Chief E.H. Stone said that a large can containing two gallons of kerosene and a small antifreeze can with a kerosene odor were found behind the stores.

Also that day, it was reported that a thief with a sack over his face and carrying an automatic shotgun walked into a service station on Atlanta Road and stole $20 from the attendant.

The Marietta City Council was reported in the Sunday, Dec. 15, 1963 paper as facing a proposal to change the names of 69 city streets when it met in January. The proposal was presented by City Planner Loe LaForge as part of a countywide program involving the renaming of streets with duplicate or similar names.

The Atomic Energy Commission in Washington, D.C., was reported in the Monday, Dec. 16, 1963 paper as proposing to permit Lockheed-Georgia Company to operate a nuclear reactor in Dawsonville at higher power. The company at the time was only licensed to operate the radiation effect reactor at a maximum power of one thermal megawatt. Under the new license, Lockheed could operate it at a maximum of three thermal megawatts.

The C-141 StarLifter was reported in the Tuesday, Dec. 17, 1963 paper as having left the ground for the first time at Dobbins Air Force Base. The successful maiden flight marked, to the day, the 60th anniversary of the Wright Brother’s flight at Kitty Hawk, N.C. At the controls of the Marietta designed and built fan-jet transport was Leo Sullivan, Lockheed-Georgia Company’s chief test pilot. Hundreds of spectators lined the Dobbins runway for the historic first flight.

In the Wednesday, Dec. 18, 1963 paper it was reported that The Sugar Shack, a dining and dancing establishment on the Four Lane Highway South (U.S. Highway 41) in Marietta, had been ordered padlocked pending a court order on charges that it was a public nuisance and had violated state liquor laws. The court order was signed by Cobb Superior Court Judge Albert Henderson at the request of Solicitor Luther Hames. Law enforcement officials were ordered to search the premises for illegal intoxicants. The following day, Thursday, Dec. 19, 1963, The Orbit Inn, a café on Bankhead Highway, was also padlocked by Cobb Sheriff Kermit Sanders following charges by Hames that it was being operated as a front for gambling and the sale of intoxicants.

20 years ago …

The public authority overseeing the $48 million Cobb Galleria Centre was reported in the Tuesday, Dec. 14, 1993 MDJ as having tried again to persuade county commissioners to write off almost $400,000 in building permit and water and sewer tap-in fees. Commission Chairman Bill Byrne – who also served on the Cobb-Marietta Coliseum and Exhibit Hall Authority – held out little hope for the request. Commissioners had turned down a similar proposal in September 1992 for the facility under construction on Cobb Parkway in the Cumberland-Galleria area noting that that the county did not waive the permits and fees for schools and other public buildings.

In the Wednesday, Dec. 15, 1993 paper it was reported that for two years after opening, the Marietta City Club was not meeting its original revenue projections and was slowly draining city coffers. The public golf club, which opened in October 1991, cleared $384,560 after expenses during the 1993 fiscal year, which was far below the $550,000 annual net income projected for each of the course’s first three years of operation.

Smyrna officials were reported in the Thursday, Dec. 16, 1993 paper as expected to annex 19 acres that included several major businesses in the Platinum Triangle. The land was in five unincorporated islands in the highly developed business district at the intersection of Interstates 285 and 75 in southeast Cobb. Annexation would mean an additional $108,000 in property taxes for Smyrna.

Kennestone Hospital trustees were reported in the Friday, Dec. 17, 1993 paper as having voted to file an appeal with the State Supreme Court of Georgia in the next stage in the war for a Cobb-based open-heart surgery center. The hospital’s appeal was in response to the Nov. 22 denial by the Georgia Court of Appeals of the hospital’s request to offer heart surgery.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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ginger allana rich m
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May 26, 2014
Its crazy how times are just as bad as they were back when i was gallabattan around the square swinging on the playground and adm kill ring that ole liberty bell on the square. i was always fascinated by it. Last time pops and i were up there i think somebodt had stole her.like a thief in the night..gofigure. it waa probably the hells angelsmotorcycle gang. Moon ans my uncle mill's were always fighting them i guess trying to keep peace in the Honky Tonks.

Happy Memorial Day to all of those great men i miss and the ones who served our u.s.communities and our Country the land of the free and the Beautiful.

The Week of Dec. 12
by Damon_Poirier
December 11, 2013 04:50 PM | 831 views | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a Confederate veteran, an Atherton’s victim, Studebakers, SPSU dorms, a walkway at Cumberland mall and Lester Maddox.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Dec. 12, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that E.P. Dobbs had been elected Mayor for the next two years during the primary election. Dobbs beat his opponent Joe M. Austin by 126 votes.

Also that week it was reported that after only a week of illness, Rev. Elam Christian died the Tuesday before. Rev. Christian had been in delicate health for years after being seriously wounded in the first volley fired at the first battle of Manassas on July 21, 1861 at the age of 19. After Manassas, he became a drill master of Southern troops at Kennesaw and was there when Northern soldiers stole the “General” and ran away with a W&A freight train. He was a local Methodist minister, but not a member of a conference, and the editor of various papers in cities and towns in Georgia, Texas and North Carolina.

50 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 6, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that Seventh District Congressman John Davis called for an end to regional differences in the country and said the surest way to accomplish that goal was to “wipe out hatred and misunderstanding.” Davis spoke to more than 1,000 Cobb County and Marietta high school seniors in a Citizenship Day Program at the Larry Bell Center in a program sponsored by the county’s four Civitan clubs. Davis credited late President Franklin D. Roosevelt with being the man who “woke up and discovered the forgotten man in our nation is the South.”

Mayor-Elect Howard Atherton and members of Marietta’s new city council were reported in the Sunday, Dec. 8, 1963 paper as agreeing to sidetrack the controversial Kennesaw Avenue and Powder Springs Street links in an effort to salvage a proposed multi-lane highway loop around the city. Atherton said he had been informed by state highway officials that the city was on the verge of losing the entire $10 million highway connector program as a result of protests.

Charles E. Scott of Powder Springs, the brave 78-year-old man with a “very strong constitution,” was reported in the Monday, Dec. 9, 1963 paper as leaving Kennestone Hospital after five weeks of hospitalization following the Halloween explosion at Atherton’s Drugstore. Scott was in the front of the building at the time of the blast and was rushed to the hospital in critical condition.

In the Tuesday, Dec. 10, 1963 paper, it was reported that the news of Studebaker closing down its U.S. Automotive production lines was no disappointment to the Marietta dealership of Burnett-Teague Motors. Officials at the Marietta firm said the demand for the cars had become almost nil and indicated the company had planned to discontinue their sales anyway.

The State Board of Regents were reported in the Thursday, Dec. 12, 1963 paper as having approved another dormitory project at Southern Tech, which is now known as Southern Polytechnic State University and currently slated to be merged with Kennesaw State University. The dormitory, which cost about $1 million dollars, was to house 180 students and the campus dining hall.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Dec. 7, 1993 MDJ, it was reported that a 37-year-old Mableton man was sentenced to 15 years in prison for the March slaying of a female friend who begged him to kill her because she thought that she was dying of AIDS. An autopsy after the woman’s death later showed that she did not have the disease. The charges, originally malice murder and felony murder, were dropped to voluntary manslaughter in return for the man’s guilty plea.

A pedestrian walkway was reported in the Thursday, Dec. 9, 1993 paper as being built across Cobb Parkway (U.S. Hwy. 41) between the Galleria Specialty and Cumberland malls, near to where the new Atlanta Braves stadium is to be built in the county. Cobb Community Improvement District and state Department of Transportation officials pledged up to $750,000 each for a walkway over the busy eight-lane highway. The final cost was expected at about $1.5 million. The walkway came about after a 15-year-old Wheeler High School student was killed while she was trying to cross Cobb Parkway from the Cumberland Mall parking lot with a friend.

Standing before a mock grave in front of his northeast Cobb home, former Georgia Gov. Lester Maddox was reported in the Saturday, Dec. 11, 1993 paper as paying his last respects to the nation’s healthcare system. Maddox said lives were threatened if President Bill Clinton pushed his plans for a national healthcare system through Congress. So he dug a grave – which was surrounded by a six-foot fence topped with barbed wire – and lowered a flag-draped casket into it to eulogize the nation’s current healthcare system and alert others to the dangers of the presidential proposal.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Dec. 5
by Damon_Poirier
December 04, 2013 11:20 AM | 833 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a pill in the nose, Kennedy’s magnolia tree, Sara Tokars, the Dobbins crash and the Kennedy Interchange.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Dec. 5, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page was taken up by an ad from Joe M. Austin with a letter to Marietta voters and the Austin Campaign Committee with an ad titled, “Some Important Questions To Ask E.P. Dobbs.” It had been reported the week before that E.P. Dobbs had been unanimously chosen as a candidate for the 1914-1915 Marietta Mayor during a mass meeting at Anderson’s Hall. Below the two ads was a third announcing a mass meeting and barbecue for Austin happening at the Court House.

Also that week it was reported that the 24-year-old man involved in a fatal shooting at an Austell store over a lost pipe, mentioned in The Week of Oct. 3rd column, was declared not guilty by a jury in the Superior Court. The shooting was believed to be in self-defense after the victim drew a pistol on his killer.

50 years ago …

A three-year old girl in Clarkdale, which is now a part of Austell, was reported in the Friday, Nov. 29, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal as trying to take a cold pill through her nose. With the pill lodged in her nostril, the parents called the Powder Springs Fire Department who attempted to remove it with an aspirator. But, the device failed to dislodge it and the girl was taken to Douglasville hospital where it was successfully removed without any harm.

In the Monday, Dec. 2, 1963 paper, Commissioner Herbert McCollum said he might refuse to license liquor stores in Cobb County even if citizens vote the county wet in a proposed referendum. Since the commissioner’s licensing power only covered unincorporated areas, his refusal would not prevent the opening of liquor stores within the individual municipalities.

Officers and personnel at Dobbins Air Force Base were reported in the Tuesday, Dec. 3, 1963 paper as having decided to plant a magnolia tree in the memory of assassinated President John F. Kennedy. The tree was to be planted at the V-intersection that stood four feet inside of the base’s main entrance gate. For more information about President Kennedy's assassination, check out The Kennedy Assassination column.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Nov. 29, 1993 MDJ, it was reported that a somber group of relatives and friends gathered at Arlington Memorial Cemetery in Sandy Springs to remember the first anniversary of the death of Sara Tokars of east Cobb. The emotional private service was attended by about 60 people, including Mrs. Tokars’ six sisters and many of her neighbors in the Kings Cove subdivision off Woodlawn Drive. Mrs. Tokars’ parents remained in Bradenton, Fla., with her two sons, who were present when their mother was killed on Nov. 29, 1992 by a shotgun blast to the head. Her husband, Fred, and the alleged triggerman were charged with her slaying. Another man had pleaded guilty to his part in the killing and was expected to testify against the others.

The failure of an experimental rudder was reported in the Thursday, Dec. 2, 1993 paper as the cause of the early February 1993 crash of a Lockheed aircraft at Dobbins Air Force Base. The deaths of the seven crew members at the base were mentioned in The 1993 Dobbins Crash column. The fiery crash occurred 26 seconds after the rudder failure caused the aircraft to mistakenly lift off the ground while simulating an engine failure on takeoff. The crewmen aboard the “High Technology Test Bed,” which was described by Lockheed as a flying laboratory, were testing a new fly-by-wire, computer-controlled rudder system. The company had planned to use the rudder system on its C-130J airlifters and modified C-141 StarLifters built at the Marietta plant. The crash led to criticism of – and eventual changes in – safety procedures at the plant.

The $75.7 million Kennedy Interchange, which is near to where the new Atlanta Braves stadium is to be built in Cobb County, was reported in the Friday, Dec. 3, 1993 paper as having cost projections increase by $3.5 million or more due to engineering changes that required additional rights of way. At the time, the Interchange was already the most expensive road project in county history. The new money was planned to buy 30 to 40 additional feet of rights of way on both the eastern and western side of I-75 to accommodate HOV lanes on the extensive ramp system. The former Eastern Airlines reservation center on Akers Mill Road, which was gutted by suspected arson in July 1991, was expected to have to be torn down under the new engineering plan.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Nov. 28th
by Damon_Poirier
November 27, 2013 10:20 AM | 785 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a mayoral candidate, subpoenas, a liquor petition, a bomb threat, NAFTA and a cougar.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Nov. 28, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that at a mass meeting held in Anderson’s Hall the night before, E.P. Dobbs was unanimously chosen as a candidate for the 1914-1915 Marietta mayor. A committee of 10, with Dobbs as an ex-officio member, totaling 11, was named to select City Councilmen from each ward to complete the ticket headed by Dobbs.

Also that week was a story stating that “the Journal believes that Cobb County has the best Sheriff in Georgia.” A week before the November term of the Superior Court, Sheriff W.E. Swanson was given 216 subpoenas to bring before the Grand Jury. By Friday of that week, 201 of them had been brought before the Grand Jury, been sworn, and by Saturday morning the Grand Jury found 64 bills of indictment. By Saturday night, 65 of those indicted had been arrested and either made bond or were in the county jail.

50 years ago …

Petitions calling for a referendum to determine if voters favored the sale of liquor in Cobb County was reported in the Friday, Nov. 22, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal as being circulated through the county for several days. State law required that when presented a petition signed by 35 percent of the registered voters, the ordinary must call a countywide referendum on the manufacture, sale and distribution of liquor. Cobb voters rejected a similar move to open the county up to liquor sales in March 1958 by a vote of 10,126 to 7,869. Cobb Ordinary Garvis Sams said he did not know who was behind the petition, but issued a blunt warning that he would not condone monkey business in the gathering of the petition.

A “bomb-call-terrorist” was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 27, 1963 paper as threatening the Pine Forest Elementary School the day before. The school received the call about 2:15 p.m. Officers rushed to the school to investigate, but found no bomb. Schools all over Marietta had been plagued with threats of bombs since late September and Kennestone Hospital had been threatened in early October.

Also that day, law enforcement officers from all over Cobb County, in a Thanksgiving Day gesture, organized a fund for the family of J.D. Tippit, a Dallas, Texas policeman who was killed by the accused assassin of President John F. Kennedy. Tippit had no life insurance. Officers in the county, touched by the family’s plight, decided to organize the fund for immediate assistance to the family.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Nov. 22, 1993 MDJ, it was reported that U.S. Rep. George “Buddy” Darden, who had collected $234,128 in political contributions from organized labor during 10 years in Congress, might lose union support because he voted for the North American Free Trade Agreement. Rep. Darden, a Marietta Democrat, was one of six members of the Georgia House delegation to vote for NAFTA. Since state labor unions and peanut farmers were the two most organized opponents of the agreement in Georgia, lawmakers who opposed them stood the most to lose. Herb Mabry, Georgia state AFL-CIO President, said that labor felt particularly betrayed by Darden because he had told union leaders up until two days before the vote that he would oppose the agreement.

The dean of Kennesaw State College’s School of Education was reported in the Tuesday, Nov. 23, 1993 paper as having announced his resignation amid efforts to regain the national accreditation the school lost in October 1993. Dr. John Beineke, who had headed the education department since 1991, would return to the classroom as a professor of history and social studies education. Kennesaw State lost its accreditation after a two-year review by the National Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) found overcrowded classrooms, too few faculty members and curriculum problems.

The Cobb County woman issued a warning earlier in the month about possessing wild animals without a license was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 24, 1993 paper as having filed a suit to get back the five-month-old cougar that was seized by state officials. The lawsuit alleged the cougar should be returned because the state law used to seize the animal was too vague and should be declared unconstitutional.

Also that day, it was reported that the state Public Safety Department had to come up with as much as $200,000 from the Georgia General Assembly before it could complete its planned move of the state Patrol’s airplane unit to McCollum Airport in Kennesaw. The plan included adding office space in a 16,250 square foot hanger built for the patrol by the county earlier in 1993 using $268,000 in funds from drug seizures.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Kennedy Assassination
by Damon_Poirier
November 22, 2013 10:15 AM | 1156 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Fifty years ago, Friday, Nov. 22, 1963, the nation was stunned as President John F. Kennedy was assassinated at 1:25 p.m. in a burst of gunfire in downtown Dallas, Texas while riding in an open car through the city’s streets. The shooting occurred as President Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline Kennedy, were riding with Texas Gov. John Connally and his wife, Idanell Brill “Nellie” Connally. 

A full story about the anniversary of the tragedy, written by Rachel Gray, can be viewed here. The column below looks at the coverage of events following the tragedy.

Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963

The citizens of Marietta, which were still not fully recovered from the fatal gas explosion at Atherton’s Drug Store on the Marietta Square, were reported as having reacted with stunned grief to the death of President Kennedy the Friday before. Within minutes of the shooting, the Square was almost completely deserted as people huddled in stores and offices around television sets and radios.

A group of people also gathered outside the pressroom doors of the Marietta Daily Journal waiting for the papers to confirm the news.

Another story reported several observations of grief the day of the shooting –

  • Lockheed workers continued at their jobs, but a noticeably slower pace.
  • The girls at a junior high school class received the news and sat at their desk crying.
  • An elderly woman was seen sitting on her front porch swing with a paper in her lap and her face in her hands.
  • The Community Players held a backstage “buck-up” session the night after the shooting and then performed to a packed house.
  • A couple sat in an automobile outside a restaurant listening to radio reports of the president’s death with their plates from eatery on the seat between them.
  • Marietta policemen said they learned of the assassination in an announcement over the police radio network
  • Smyrna Mayor J.B. Ables, an employee at Lockheed, called the Journal after Kennedy was shot to confirm the shooting and ask about the President’s condition only to later learn of his death in a Lockheed intercom announcement.
  • The flag over the Cobb-Marietta Library on Atlanta Street was lowered to half mast immediately with others in the city following suit.
  • After the announcement of Kennedy’s death, the Journal received a telephone report that Vice President Johnson had suffered a heart attack. A check with United Press International in Atlanta dismissed the report.

A special community-wide prayer and worship service to pray for the family of the slain President and for guidance for President Lyndon Johnson was held in the sanctuary of the First Baptist Church. Rev. Lewis Davis, pastor of the Powers Ferry Road Methodist Church and president of the Marietta Ministerial Association, participated with the pastors of First Baptist, First Presbyterian, St. James Episcopal and First Methodist churches. St. Joseph’s Catholic Church held a requiem high mass.

All schools, county and city offices, along with federal government buildings and several businesses were to close on Monday, Nov. 25 in memory of the late President while President Johnson declared it a day of national mourning. Southern Tech, which is now known as Southern Polytechnic State University, and the University Center of Georgia Marietta Center also announced canceled classes.

Over 2,000 extra copies of the MDJ were circulated the evening of the assassination. Circulation showed a record number of 18,538 copies of the paper were distributed.

John Hill, who was the MDJ’s distributor at Lockheed, was the first carrier to hit the streets with the paper. Normally, Hill carried 477 papers daily to the plant. But, that day he came back twice for more and sold about 1,200 paper to employees as they started home.

Monday, Nov. 25, 1963

Work came to a halt at noon at Lockheed as people joined in a memorial service to the late President. In addition to the Marietta plant, the Atlanta, Dawsonville, Clarksburg, W.Va., Charleston, S.C., and Sandusky, Ohio locations also went silent in preparation of the Washington, D.C., memorial. At the Marietta plant, W.A. Pulver, president of Lockheed-Georgia Company, went on the plant-wide public address system to lead the observance.

A flag flying at half staff out of respect was reported stolen from the American Legion Post No. 29 on Gresham Street in Marietta. Commander Doyce Lambert called it “the worst act of vandalism, I have ever encountered” and offered a $50 reward for information leading to the arrest of the vandals.

Another story observed:

  • A wreath of white flowers was reported hanging near the door of the County Courthouse.
  • A young man walking nervously across the Square with red eyes, told a Journal reporter that he hadn’t cried since he was a baby.
  • There was very little automobile traffic on the Square and open parking spaces.
  • Dobbins Air Force Base was virtually closed. Only about 15 men, security and firemen, were on duty.
  • Banks were closed at noon. Savings and loan associations were closed all day.
  • The parking lot at the new Cobb Center, which normally held thousands of cars, only had about 30 in the lot.
  • At Kennestone Hospital, the glass front doors closed at 11 a.m. Patients, visitors and staff paused for a moment of silent prayer before Rev. Joseph T. Walker, rector of St. James Episcopal Church, read from the eighth chapter of the Epistle to the Romans over the speaker system.

About 1,600 people were also reported as having attended the memorial services at First Baptist Church.

Friday, Nov. 29, 1963

Dobbins Air Force Base commander, Brig. Gen. George H. Wilson announced that a tree would be planted at the base in memory of the President on Pearl Harbor Day, Dec. 7, at 10 a.m. Participating in the event would be the Marine Air detachment, Air Force reserve units, the Naval Air Station and the Georgia Air National Guard. The tree was to be planted with a plaque unveiled as an expression of the base’s personal sorrow in the passing of the commander-in-chief.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Nov. 14th
by Damon_Poirier
November 14, 2013 12:40 PM | 817 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Georgia Products Day, buying a plane with trading stamps and developments in the Fred Tokars case.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Nov. 14, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that from scores of cities throughout the state reports were coming into the headquarters of the Georgia Chamber of Commerce that the celebration of Georgia Products Day, on Nov. 18, 1913 in Marietta, would be great advertising for the State of Georgia’s resources. Georgia Products Day, endorsed by Gov. John M. Slaton with a proclamation, had become known in every section of the state and almost every progressive town. Throughout the state, nearly 40 organized commercial bodies were working on the event.

Also that week was a story stating that the Marietta Boy Scouts football team won 18 to zero over the Atlanta Boy Scouts team the week before.

50 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 8, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal, there was a front page story about Cobb legislators agreeing that they would oppose increasing the state sales tax to four percent. The delegation said it would not favor any tax increase unless mandatory local support to education was made statewide. Legislators also said they would favor a teacher merit pay program.

John LeCroy, Cobb Clerk of Court and member of the advisory board since 1939, announced in the Sunday, Nov. 10, 1963 paper his opposition to the proposed three-man commission drawn up in a bill passed by the 1963 General Assembly that county voters were to vote upon in January 1964. The bill, if approved, would abolish the advisory board which was composed of the commission of roads and revenue, clerk of court and ordinary.

Presbyterian women in Marietta were reported in the Monday, Nov. 11, 1963 paper as taking part in an unusual fund raising drive – collecting trading stamps to buy an airplane. The plane, which cost 5,580,000 stamps, would be used by Dr. James Boyce, a medical missionary in Mexico.

In the Tuesday, Nov. 12, 1963 paper, it was reported that the partially-burned body of a 46-year-old Marietta man was found on the dirt floor in the basement of the old Coca-Cola bottling company plant on Husk Street. At the scene were several hair tonic bottles along with evidence of a fire on an old quilt and parts of card board boxes.

A $2,250,000 bond issue to finance the proposed Cobb County Junior college was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 13, 1963 paper. The proposal, adopted the day before, called for the Cobb County Board of Education and the City of Marietta to hold referendums on the same day to approve the bonds. A one-half mill tax increase would be required to finance the bond.

20 years ago …

A planned move of the 116th Tactical Fighter Wing from Dobbins Air Reserve Base to Robins Air Force Base near Macon was reported in the Tuesday, Nov. 9, 1993 MDJ as having been put off for at least a year. An amendment by U.S. Rep. George “Buddy” Darden, D-Marietta, forbidding the use of any funds to relocate the Air National Guard wing was included in the final version of the 1994 fiscal defense appropriations bill passed by Congress the day before.

Fred Tokars, a former tax attorney and part-time Atlanta traffic judge, was reported in the Friday, Nov. 12, 1993 paper as being expected to ask Cobb County to pay the legal bill for his death-penalty trial. Jerry Froelich, the lawyer who Tokars paid to represent him on money-laundering charges in U.S. District Court in Atlanta, said that he had not been paid in the Cobb case where his client was facing murder, armed robbery and kidnapping in the November 1993 shotgun slaying of his wife, Sara. Cobb District Attorney Tom Charron scoffed at Froelich’s suggestion that Tokars be declared indigent and told Cobb Superior Court Judge Watson White that he wanted a hearing before a ruling was made.

In the Saturday, Nov. 13, 1993 paper, it was reported that federal officials filed documents saying that Cobb County might have illegally taken evidence from the Tokars home the night his wife, was killed, but Charron said that it would have no effect on his prosecution of Tokars. Federal prosecutor Buddy Parker said he agreed with Froelich that the only evidence Cobb could use in court is evidence found during an initial search of the east Cobb home.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Nov. 7th
by Damon_Poirier
November 07, 2013 01:20 PM | 768 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at cattle, cotton, carbon monoxide and a cougar.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Nov. 7, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that locals won several prizes on cattle at the State Fair. Bob Northcutt won seven first places on Dairy Cattle and J.T. Anderson won seven first places on Herefords.

Also that week was a story stating that J.L. Stephens, the cotton census enumerator for Cobb County, reported officially that the cotton ginned in the county as of Oct. 18 was 9,893 bales compared to the 4,588 bales for the same time in 1912. Another cotton record listed was that three bales of cotton were raised by W.H. Collier on one acre of land four miles north of Acworth. On an adjoining farm, W.S. Collier raised five bales on two acres.

Another story that week reported that Polk Street resident W.J. Pearce found a dozen, small, firm, white clear seed peaches growing on three trees in his back yard.

50 years ago …

In the Monday, Nov. 4, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that two Mableton sandwich catering service owners were found dead in their shop from carbon monoxide poisoning. Cobb deputies said fumes from a circulating heater apparently killed the men. The men were working on plumbing in the building and had set up what appeared to be temporary living quarters at the back of the shop.

Also that day, former Mayor George Kreeger scored a political comeback with a 119-vote victory over Fourth Ward City Councilman Harold Smith in Smyrna’s biennial city election. Kreeger, who had the support of Incumbent Mayor J.B. “Jake” Ables, polled 1,046 votes while Smith drew 927.

The Cobb Advisory Board was reported in the Tuesday, Nov. 5, 1963 paper as having voted to sign a one-year lease with International Business Machines (IBM) for automatic data processing equipment to be used in the transaction of county affairs.

The crash of a single-engine, light plane was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 6, 1963 paper as having killed a Virginia Beach, Va., man, his wife and their unborn child on Brown Road near Powder Springs. A spokesman for the Federal Aviation Agency said the family took off from Fulton County Airport bound for New Orleans in foggy weather with zero visibility.

The Marietta Junior Welfare League was reported in the Thursday, Nov. 7, 1963 paper as having launched a $100,000 fund drive to purchase land and construct a Cobb County Youth Museum. League Publicity Chairman Mrs. Luther Fortson said that members had pledged for than $20,000 and the remaining $80,000 would be sought in public contributions.

20 years ago …

In the Thursday, Nov. 4, 1993 MDJ, it was reported that a Marietta man frustrated with being rejected twice in his attempts to be a police officer, decided to take the law in his own hands. The man, a part-time landscaper, stole a police radar gun, a pair of blue Fulton County Police fatigues and a ticket book from the police car of a Fulton officer who lived in northeast Cobb. The man, clad in a partial uniform, began using the radar gun to stop motorists in Cobb, Cherokee and Fulton counties before being arrested.

A Cobb County woman was reported in the Friday, Nov. 5, 1993 paper as being cited in October for illegally owning a three-month-old cougar – which was classified as an endangered species. The woman, who brought the cougar to Cobb from South Carolina, was believed to have endangered a 15-year-old family friend that was bitten by the animal on Oct. 22.

Forced out by the state Board of Regents, U.S. Rep. Newt Gingrich of east Cobb was reported in the Saturday, Nov. 6, 1993 paper as moving his controversial “Renewing American Civilization” course from Kennesaw State College to Reinhardt College, a private institution in Waleska. The House minority whip decided to switch schools after the George Board of Regents said that a full-time public office-holder could not teach in the state university system.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Atherton's Drug Store Explosion
by Damon_Poirier
October 31, 2013 10:00 AM | 1300 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Fifty years ago, Thursday, Oct. 31, 1963, the City of Marietta suffered one of its greatest tragedies – a gas explosion that ripped through the front portion of the Atherton Drug Store on the Marietta Square, killing seven people and injuring over 20 others. At the time of the explosion, Halloween festivities were in full swing with a Y.M.C.A-sponsored parade and a window painting contest on the Square.

A full story about the anniversary of the 1963 tragedy, written by Rachel Gray, can be viewed here. The column below looks at the day by day coverage of events relating to the tragedy.

Sunday, Nov. 3, 1963

Two men – Charles E. Scott, 78, and J.B. Lamer, 22, - remained in critical condition in Kennestone Hospital.

Marietta Mayor Sam Welsch ordered the flags in the park, City Hall and the Marietta Post Office be flown at half-mast throughout the weekend. A drive-in on the Four Lane (U.S. Hwy. 41) also lowered its flag.

Investigators continued searching for the cause of the blast. Capt. Bartow Adair, head of the Fire Prevention Bureau and Fire Inspector, was quoted as saying that it was a low order explosion, which pushes rather than shatters, and could have occurred from many substances – including natural gas. Adair also said some witnesses had testified that they had smelled gas in and around the building beforehand.

The Marietta Fire Department was also reported looking for the person who answered the phone at the drug store immediately after the blast. Three soda fountain girls were said to have heard the phone ring in the pay booth at the end of the counter just before the explosion.

Gene Nesbitt, the merchandise manager at Atherton’s, had placed the call and said someone answered saying, “We’ve just had an explosion.” Adair said whoever stepped into the booth to answer the phone was in the area of the worst destruction and that Nesbitt’s call had saved their life.

Marietta mayor-elect Howard Atherton Jr. was quoted as saying a new drug store would be built on the explosion site. Atherton said plans called for a one-story brick structure with more floor space than before and office space on a mezzanine. Construction of the new store would begin once the insurance companies could determine the amount of damage to the store and the structure was torn down.

Monday, Nov. 4, 1963

Investigators continued to question witnesses about the explosion. Adair was quoted as saying that nothing new had developed in the case and the cause of the blast was still unknown.

Scott and Lamer were still in critical condition at Kennestone Hospital, while policemen W.R. Raines, Wyndall Black and George Kelly, who were injured in the blast, were listed as in good condition. Capt. H.P. Craft also entered the hospital with a back ailment caused by rescue operations during the disaster.

Sightseers from all over Georgia came by to see the shell of the ruined store. Police said at one time that cars were lined up from the light at the railroad crossing on Powder Springs Street all the way across the Marietta Square.

Special prayers for the dead and injured were offered in all of Marietta’s churches. At St. James Episcopal Church, it was noted that more than 60 people took Holy Communion on Sunday night compared to the usual 25 in attendance.

Tuesday, Nov. 5, 1963

Investigators were drawing closer to the end of their inquiries and said that the possible cause of the blast was natural gas. Tuesday’s operations consisted of boring holes in the sidewalk next to the store, testing cracks in the basement and searching the front of the building for evidence of gas leaks.

Witnesses were still being questioned and the Marietta Fire Department had not yet discovered who answered the phone that rang just before the explosion.

Scott and Lamer remained in critical condition at Kennestone Hospital. Raines, Black and Kelly along with teenager Jimmy Smith were listed as in good condition. The three policemen were talking with Smith at the front of the store at the time of the blast. Another injured man, Fred Grant was transferred to Georgia Baptist Hospital in Atlanta.

Howard Atherton Jr. was quoted as saying that the business office of the drug store would be set up in the old Western Union office on Powder Springs Street next to the First National Bank.

Approximately 3,000 long distance calls were handled by Southern Bell Telephone Company during the “peak” hours of the tragedy. The phone company also took 1,400 calls for information and 600 “assistance” calls. District Manager J.E. Breedlove said the total 3,000 calls did not include local calls, which were not counted due to the automated system. But, Breedlove said it was triple the number of calls they ordinarily carried between 6:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m.

Normally, 15-20 women manned the switchboards during those hours, but that night 60 operators were on duty. Breedlove said that he didn’t have to call a single person in because they all heard about the blast and started streaming into the office on their own.

Wednesday, Nov. 6, 1963

A 30-foot length of gas line along the front of the store had been exposed and an inch-by-inch examination of the line was being made. Marietta Fire Chief Howard Schaffer said they uncovered several lateral holes running from the line to the basement wall of the building, made by old roots, which could have made it possible for gas to penetrate a point near the building.

Scott and Lamer continued to remain in critical condition at Kennestone.

Thursday, Nov. 7, 1963

Scott and Lamer showed slight improvement and all of the other injured were listed in good condition, according to a hospital spokesman.

High winds caused concern at the blast site because the wide open front allowed the wind to sweep inward and put pressure on the weakened walls. Despite the hazard, investigators spooned out particles of roots believed to have caused the leakage in the gas pipe. Also found was what resembled a large railroad tie with an old, square, rusted iron nail in it. Samples of wood and dirt were taken for laboratory testing.

Friday, Nov. 8, 1963

Scott and Lamer continued to remain in critical condition at the hospital.

Gas mains around the drug store were sealed off to further test the cause of the explosion. Valves were installed and gas pressure was taken off the lines around the wrecked building. Temporary service lines were run to the buildings around the drug store location.

Schaffer said excavation was discontinued because the vibrations caused by the air hammers used to tear up the sidewalks threatened to collapse the weakened store walls. Further excavation would continue after merchandise and fixtures were taken from the building and a wrecking crew demolished the walls.

Dr. Howard Jones, head of the Georgia Bureau of Investigation team, sent an official letter of commendation to Mayor Welsch praising Schaffer and his staff, the city police, City Engineer C.C. Davis and his staff, the Marietta Civil Defense workers, the Cobb County Sheriff’s Office, Dr. Webster A. Sherrer – the state medical examiner for Cobb County, and Atlanta Gas Light Company for their help in the investigation.

Sunday, Nov. 10, 1963

Schaffer confirmed discovery of a gas leak in the main running in front of the ruins of the drug store. In a preliminary report to the City Council, he said the leak was caused by “corrosive action” which permitted gas to escape at a rate of 10 cubic feet every 79 seconds. Schaffer also said that the investigation had revealed “spots as big as half-dollars, quarters and dimes showing corrosive action” in addition to the point of the leak.

Scott remained in critical condition at Kennestone. Lamer, however, was downgraded to fair condition. Smith was scheduled to have his leg amputated by surgeons.

Monday, Nov. 11, 1963

Scott remained in critical condition for the 12th day, while Lamer was listed in satisfactory condition.

Tuesday, Nov. 12, 1963

Tentative plans called for the wrecking operation of the shell of the drug store. Davis said that the building would probably be dismantled instead of pulled down, which would take about three weeks.

Scott, who had been critical for two weeks, improved enough for the hospital to list him as in fair condition.

Wednesday, Nov. 13, 1963

A contract with the Continental Wrecking Corporation of Atlanta was signed to dismantle the drug store at a cost of about $6,000. R.H. Isley, superintendent of the wrecking company crew, said it would take three to four weeks to complete.

G.B. Lee, the office supervisor of the Marietta branch of the Atlanta Gas Light Company, said the company had begun its annual check of pipes in Marietta and the Cobb County area. The survey was expected to take two to three weeks to complete.

Scott slipped back onto the critical list, but Lamer, Smith, Raines and Black were all listed in good condition at the hospital.

Thursday, Nov. 14, 1963

Raines was released from the hospital, while Scott remained in critical condition after only one day off the list since the explosion.

The “mystery phone call answerer” still had not been found and the investigation now indicated that both the phones of the prescription side and in the pay booth had rung and were answered.

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