From left, Kristin Shaw, Jennifer Johnson, Beth McClure and Leah Yankus enjoy their Peppermint Martinis and Poinsettias cocktails. The cocktails complete a holiday meal or go well on their own at New Year’s. <br>Special to the MDJ
From left, Kristin Shaw, Jennifer Johnson, Beth McClure and Leah Yankus enjoy their Peppermint Martinis and Poinsettias cocktails. The cocktails complete a holiday meal or go well on their own at New Year’s.
Special to the MDJ
slideshow
Peppermints and poinsettias: New Year's just isn't New Year's without a time-honored cocktail
December 27, 2014 08:07 PM | 95 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
From left, Kristin Shaw, Jennifer Johnson, Beth McClure and Leah Yankus enjoy their Peppermint Martinis and Poinsettias cocktails. The cocktails complete a holiday meal or go well on their own at New Year’s. <br>Special to the MDJ
From left, Kristin Shaw, Jennifer Johnson, Beth McClure and Leah Yankus enjoy their Peppermint Martinis and Poinsettias cocktails. The cocktails complete a holiday meal or go well on their own at New Year’s.
Special to the MDJ
slideshow
Make your holiday gathering more festive with a specialty cocktail. East Cobb resident Kristin Shaw shares recipes for Peppermint Martinis and Poinsettias. “We chose the drinks as part of our holiday themed dinner. The cocktails are perfect for the holiday season and New Years gatherings,” said Shaw, who hosted a holiday gathering at her home along with Beth McClure, Jennifer Johnson, and Leah Yankus. The ladies served Peppermint Martinis, a sweet refreshing concoction, and Poinsettias, a champagne cocktail. “The (Peppermint Martini) drink is festive in nature due to the color, the glass and of course the candy cane,” said Shaw, wife of Glenn Shaw. They have one daughter: 13-year-old Ala and one son, 10-year-old Clark. Both attend the Walker School. “Nothing says ‘the holidays’ like a candy cane in your drink,” she said. The Poinsettias are topped off with a playful pompom swizzle stick, making it a wonderful drink for the holidays. “This is a classic Christmas Day Brunch cocktail with its pinkish glow,” Shaw said. Peppermint Martinis Ingredients: 1 candy cane 2.5 oz Vanilla Vodka 1 oz Peppermint Schnapps 1 squeeze lime 1 sprig fresh mint Ice How to make it: Mix vodka, schnapps, lime and mint. Garnish glass with candy cane. Poinsettias Ingredients: 3 ounces Cranberry Juice 1 ounce Cointreau Champagne How to make it: Mix the cranberry juice and Cointreau. Pour into champagne glass and top off with champagne. Fancy up the cocktail with a red pompom swizzle stick.
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Christmas breakfast brings merriment at The Kells
by Sally Litchfield
December 27, 2014 08:05 PM | 57 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The jingle bells were ringing loud and clear on Dec. 11 as old friends gathered for an annual holiday breakfast at the Marietta home of Carole Kell. She is the wife of the late Coach Corky Kell for whom Kell High School was named. The Kells moved to Marietta in 1965 when Corky took a coaching and teaching job at Wheeler High School. In 1980, he was promoted to county athletic director. Carole served her standard fare of biscuits, gravy, fried pork tenderloin and bacon and cheese grits, all made from “scratch.” Of course, there was also the usual fare of sorghum, honey and homemade jellies and jams. It was a festive time for all the guests including Alice and Glenn Brock, Carolyn and Doug Chaffins, Liz Cole, Sue Hanson, Anna and Johnny Johnson (with Johnny in his authentic Santa attire), and Terri and Earl Reece. ♦ ♦ ♦ Why do a bunch of different women come together during the holidays? Easy — girls just wanna have fun. More than 30 ladies called the DIVAS — Dames in the Village Association (from the Village of Barrett Greene) — gathered for a merry holiday party at the home of Shirley Bachus. Bachus’s home is the Spode capital of the neighborhood. She has dishes and pieces that adorn her lovely home that always make for a very festive evening. Barbara Cobb, Shirley Demarest, Judy DuPre, Nancy Kussela, Janet Nesbit, Patti Normand and Ingrid Olsen provided delicious food and drink. The DIVAS were very competitive this year as they sang Christmas songs and added their own touches. Their interpretation of “Silent Night” (cha-cha-cha) was the hit of the evening. This group of DIVAS meets four times a year as a neighborhood of ladies who are active in their community. ♦ ♦ ♦ E&L Cuisine in Smyrna, a new catering company to the Atlanta area, hosted a Toys for Tots benefit dinner on Dec. 13. The event raised more than $800 in donations alone, not including the toys donated. About 40 children in the area were provided with toys as a result of the event. Kathleen Bergan, Jerome Burley, Ricky Cook, Michelle Corrigan, Timothy Evans, Brandon Foster, Veronica Gustafson, James Hatchel, Sean Jackson, Gretchen Mathis, David Morris, Billy McDaniel, Elise Thompson, JT Thompson, Libby White, and Olivia Woods were among the guests. Sally Litchfield is a longtime Marietta resident. She formerly practiced law in Marietta and now stays home to raise her two children. Send Sally news at sallylit@bellsouth.net.
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Looking ahead by looking back
by Roger Hines
December 27, 2014 07:29 PM | 100 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
William Faulkner, the eminent Southern novelist, once remarked, “The past is not over yet.” William Shakespeare, 350 years earlier in his final play, said the same thing differently: “The past is prologue.” With a New Year facing us, it might be fruitful to consider some things said in the past by those who were not captive to what Cicero called “the tyranny of the present.” Yes, looking only at today’s headlines without ever consulting a history book, we deny ourselves of any context. The truly educated person is one who understands how and by whom things came to be as they are. Actually, formal schooling is not necessary for gaining such an understanding, but a modest amount of reading probably is. Just as importantly, learning the background and context of the issues we face today or knowing something about the build-up to the issues can help us avoid dismay. Screaming headlines can make us think things are falling apart, but a little knowledge of the past can show us that things are actually coming together, that is, coming together just as the reformers who set them in place wished. If we know what led up to present conditions, we are better equipped to cope or to alter them. For instance, are we informed about President Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society with its accompanying War on Poverty and how those initiatives increased the role of government? Are we aware of the fact that President Johnson, raised amongst considerable poverty, was dead serious about abolishing poverty in America and believed only governmental action could do it? The War on Poverty certainly didn’t eliminate poverty. My hunch is it increased it. It most certainly led to an impoverished spirit of dependency. But my chief point is, if he were still around, Johnson would be quite pleased at the pace of government’s growth. Blind to the War on Poverty’s failure, he would still be content with government’s long tentacles simply because he believed in big government. Johnson loved statism, viewing laws and governmental regulation as the instrumental cure for most ills. His perfect protégé is our current president. More than anyone else, even more than FDR, it was Lyndon Johnson who moved our nation and our mindset from a federal government to a national government. Johnson was aided and abetted by Nixon (the EPA), Carter (the Department of Education), Bush (he of the “Read my lips, no more taxes” taxes), Bush (No Child Left Behind), and Obama (Obamacare and a lust for monarchy). As we see, not all these men were Democrats. There are two realities that should show the new Congress that Americans don’t like our shift from a federal government to a national government. One is the emergence of the Tea Party which is still a viable and active movement despite what the old line media says. The other is the November Republican landslide. If Republicans are so foolish as to shun the Tea Party and ignore their own landslide, it will mean they have chosen to ignore, perhaps to discard, one of their classic spokespersons from the past, Arizona’s Barry Goldwater. A champion of justice everywhere, but particularly for Arizona’s Navaho population, Goldwater echoed the philosophy of Cicero, John Locke and Jefferson, and the toughness of Teddy Roosevelt all at once. Here is the GOP’s 1964 standard bearer at his best: “I have little interest in streamlining government or making it more efficient, for I mean to reduce its size. I do not undertake to promote welfare for I propose to extend freedom. My aim is not to pass laws but to repeal them, not to inaugurate new programs but to cancel old ones that do violence to the Constitution. I will not attempt to discover which legislation is ‘needed’ before I have determined whether it is constitutionally permissible. And if I should later be attacked for neglecting my constituents’ ‘interests,’ I shall reply that I was informed that their interest is liberty and that in that cause I am doing the best I can.” Goldwater, the first tea partier, it seems to me, penned these words in 1960 in his little book “The Conscience of a Conservative.” If, after the recent November megaphone, the Republican Party chooses to ignore or to view with disdain Goldwater’s time-honored conservative manifesto, the party’s certain death will be well deserved. If after yet another chance, Republicans fail to reign in government’s power, I have no doubt that Goldwater’s children (we other kids of the ’60s the media didn’t notice) will look elsewhere for leadership. We just don’t like tyranny, even soft tyranny. Roger Hines is a retired high school English teacher and state legislator in Kennesaw.
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Enter maze of days in New Year with boldness
by Nelson Price
December 27, 2014 07:28 PM | 76 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Two cartoons come to mind as we face the New Year. One depicts a group of little fuzzy yellow ducklings walking through tall grass with their necks stuck out above it. The caption reads, “Go forth and conquer.” Even if the condition of the ducklings seems to represent you, courage like they depict can make you a conqueror. The other is a poster picturing a caterpillar looking out of his cocoon at a beautiful butterfly flying overhead. The caption, “You can fly, but that cocoon has got to go.” The dawning of a new year often makes us aware of some things that have “got to go.” It is a grand time to shed some old things in our life that keep us from being our best. This new year places at your disposal 8,756 hours. If you are average, you will sleep 2,920 of them. That leaves you 5,836 hours in which to achieve your best and obtain your heart’s desire. Don’t be like the goof who used this logic. You work one third of a day, 8 hours; that totals 122 days a year. There are 52 Sundays a year; that leaves 70 work days. There are 52 Saturdays a year; that leaves 18 work days a year. You get two weeks, 14 days, vacation. That leaves only four work days a year. The average worker takes three days sick leave; that leaves one work day a year. That is not a fuzzy duckling mentality. There is so much uncertainty in our world that venturing into a new year is a precarious challenge. At a time even more daunting than this King George VI of England, facing the approaching dark hours of World War II, quoted Minnie Louise Haskins in his 1939 Christmas broadcast to the Empire. “I said to the man who stood at the gate of the year, ‘Give me a light that I may tread safely into the unknown.’ He replied, ‘Go out into the darkness and put your hand into the hand of God. That shall be to you better than the light and safer than a known way.’” Though often lamentably overlooked, there is a spiritual dimension to life. When it is properly figured into the equation of life, a new perspective is gained. It affords assurance we are not in this life alone. There is a spiritual resource, as Haskins noted. Twelve months ago, another new year was set before us. It has rolled into eternity, carrying with it broken hearts, shattered dreams, personal losses, and unanticipated anguish. Though itis as much history as 1776, it has also archived accomplishments, achievements, joys, successes and dreams fulfilled. Don’t be so overcome by the former list of negatives you fail to reflect on the positive ones. Accept the council of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow who advised, “Look not mournfully into the past, it comes not back again. Wisely improve the present, it is thine. Go forth to meet the shadowy future without fear and with a manly heart.” Make that the heart of a fuzzy little yellow duckling. With your hand on the doorknob of a new year you can enter the maze of days with boldness. The strength needed is not something, but Someone. That can result in what I wish for you a — Happy New Year! The Rev. Dr. Nelson L. Price is author of “Heaven: Earth’s Ultimate Mystery,” “Plodders, Servants Not Celebrities, The Apostles,” “Prayer: Closet Power,” and “Backstage at the Manger.”
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