West Virginia tells company to disclose everything spilled
by Jonathan Mattise, Associated Press
January 22, 2014 12:00 PM | 520 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Freedom Industries President Gary Southern leaves the company’s bankruptcy hearing in Charleston, W.Va., Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014. Southern testified about the company following the chemical spill into the Elk River. The company reached a bankruptcy court deal Tuesday for up to $4 million in credit from a lender to help continue operations, a company attorney said. (AP Photo/The Daily Mail, Craig Cunningham)
Freedom Industries President Gary Southern leaves the company’s bankruptcy hearing in Charleston, W.Va., Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014. Southern testified about the company following the chemical spill into the Elk River. The company reached a bankruptcy court deal Tuesday for up to $4 million in credit from a lender to help continue operations, a company attorney said. (AP Photo/The Daily Mail, Craig Cunningham)
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In this Jan. 13, 2014, photo, workers, left, inspect an area outside a retaining wall around storage tanks where a chemical leaked into the Elk River at Freedom Industries storage facility in Charleston, W.Va. The chemical spill that contaminated water for hundreds of thousands of West Virginians is just the latest and most high-profile case of coal polluting the nation’s waters. An Associated Press analysis of federal environmental data found chemicals and waste from the coal industry have tainted hundreds of waterways and groundwater supplies for decades, spoiling private wells, shutting down fishing and rendering streams virtually lifeless. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
In this Jan. 13, 2014, photo, workers, left, inspect an area outside a retaining wall around storage tanks where a chemical leaked into the Elk River at Freedom Industries storage facility in Charleston, W.Va. The chemical spill that contaminated water for hundreds of thousands of West Virginians is just the latest and most high-profile case of coal polluting the nation’s waters. An Associated Press analysis of federal environmental data found chemicals and waste from the coal industry have tainted hundreds of waterways and groundwater supplies for decades, spoiling private wells, shutting down fishing and rendering streams virtually lifeless. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
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In this photo taken on Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, a truck hauling chemicals from Freedom Industries’ Elk River facility in Charleston, W.Va., backs into a spot at Poca Blending in Nitro, W.Va. Freedom Industries has been hauling 4-methylcyclohexane methanol from their leaking storage tanks in Charleston, to Poca Blending in Nitro. (AP Photo/Charleston Daily Mail, Craig Cunningham)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, a truck hauling chemicals from Freedom Industries’ Elk River facility in Charleston, W.Va., backs into a spot at Poca Blending in Nitro, W.Va. Freedom Industries has been hauling 4-methylcyclohexane methanol from their leaking storage tanks in Charleston, to Poca Blending in Nitro. (AP Photo/Charleston Daily Mail, Craig Cunningham)
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CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia regulators have ordered Freedom Industries to disclose everything that spilled when a storage tank leaked and contaminated the water supply for 300,000 people.

The Department of Environmental Protection says has given the company until 4 p.m. Wednesday to provide the information.

The tank at Freedom's Charleston facility spilled a coal-cleaning chemical, Crude MCHM, on Jan. 9 in the Elk River.

The DEP says the company disclosed Tuesday that the tank also contained about 400 gallons of polglycol ethers, or PPH. The chemical is added to the Crude MCHM mixture.

DEP Secretary Randy Huffman says in a news release that the delay in disclosing the second chemical is unacceptable.

A spokeswoman for Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin said Wednesday that initial tests didn't detect PPH in the water.



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