Time to follow God’s teachings
July 09, 2014 12:14 AM | 944 views | 8 8 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print
DEAR EDITOR,

   As a brother of six boys and one girl ,in which all boys served our country during the WWII, Korean, Vietnam war times, and as a very concerned citizen of the United States of America and the Kingom of God as a servant of God, I’m very concerned for our country. I’m 76 years of age and have observed many changes in our country — mostly not for the better because we have seen our country come from a government of/for/by the people, to a people for the government. 

I’ve seen the documentary “America” — what would the world do without America?  We are facing an election and for the life of me and my country I cannot vote for an incumbent.

I believe we are in need of those who are and demonstrate a love and concern for the values of our forefathers that founded this great nation under God’s direction, and not for the political party that they are affiliated with.

I believe as the Christian Bible states for citizens, it’s time for all of us to wake up, clean up and follow the teaching of the God who I believe led our forefathers to write the “Declaration of Independence,” and form this Great Nation.

The Rev. John B. Creech Sr.

Smyrna

Comments
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anonymous
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July 10, 2014
Rev Creech,

More has improved in this country than has not. There is no more slavery, women have equal rights, education has improved, medical advancements have increased life spans and eased suffering, health insurance is available to everyone without preexisting conditions, Medicare, Social Security, electricity and indoor plumbing are available to most people, transportation is much better and quicker, and these are just a few of the improvements in the U.S. since the first group came from England.

Please re-read the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and some history concerning our founding fathers. You should they were not imposing their religious beliefs upon the citizens.
Least of These
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July 09, 2014
Rev. Creech - I couldn't agree more. Would you PLEASE contact all the Cobb Christian leaders and ask them to contact the state legislature and beg them to accept Medicaid expansion so 650,000 poor Georgians can access healthcare.

Jesus told us to care for them.
Ben Twomey
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July 10, 2014
Yeah, Foley. But, Jesus told US to take care of them, not give our resources to the government in order that the government can use it to turn them into slaves.

I love it when atheists like you try to quote what the Bible says to shore up one of their lame arguments. They invariably look foolish, as you do here.
Say What???
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July 09, 2014
When you were born, male life expectancy in this country averaged 61 years. It's now 77. Keep your barbaric fairy tales to yourself; they have no place among rational adults.
Ben Twomey
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July 10, 2014
With your hate filled diatribe, it appears you are the one who has no place among rational adults.
Say What???
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July 11, 2014
Ben, on what planet does calling a barbaric fairy tale, a barbaric fairy tale, sound like a "hate-filled diatribe?"

I recommend you actually read the book that contains the characters you worship - then we'll pick up this chat about what's rational to believe and what's not.
Ben Twomey
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July 12, 2014
@Say What??? First of all, belittling or judging someone else's belief is, on any planet, call "hate-filled" diatribe. If I say that you are amoral and a fool for believing in nothing, that would be hate-filled diatribe. You see, you are free to believe what you will, as is the writer of this letter. Neither should be castigated or belittled for their beliefs.

As to your challenge to me, I will pass that off as the remark fo a fool, since you have no idea what or who I "worship" or believe in.
Say What???
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July 13, 2014
Ben, you are wrong. Calling a belief "religious" does not protect it from critique, judgment, or ridicule. We are only a few centuries removed from a time when people like me were literally burned at the stake for criticizing religious beliefs. If the idea can't withstand criticism, then it's the idea that is faulty, not the critic.

In this case, the pessimistic letter writer is suggesting that things are worse now than they were back in the good old days and that we should worship a Middle Eastern war god to make things better. I used data to show that he is wrong. That's not castigation, that's correction.

And contrary to your assumption, I believe in reality - which is very different than saying I believe in "nothing."

Lastly, you referenced the Bible in an earlier post, not me; therefore I assumed - perhaps incorrectly - that it was that particular book which contains the characters you worship.
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