Students develop ideas to promote sustainability for rebuilding of school
by Lindsay Field
September 18, 2013 01:33 AM | 2686 views | 1 1 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Walton High School AP Environmental class students senior Sean Bales, Amanda Skinner, Shannon Ke and Anqing Xiongzou, all sophomores, are a part of the building design team in Sharon Camps’ class. They are preparing final developments to present to Chapman Griffin Lanier Sussenbach Architects Inc. of Atlanta on Oct. 14.  <br>Staff/Kelly J. Huff
Walton High School AP Environmental class students senior Sean Bales, Amanda Skinner, Shannon Ke and Anqing Xiongzou, all sophomores, are a part of the building design team in Sharon Camps’ class. They are preparing final developments to present to Chapman Griffin Lanier Sussenbach Architects Inc. of Atlanta on Oct. 14.
Staff/Kelly J. Huff
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EAST COBB — Students in three science classes at Walton High School are working together to draft environmentally friendly recommendations on the rebuilding of their school.

In March, Cobb voters approved a fourth SPLOST program to benefit schools in the Cobb County School District and Marietta City Schools. A new building for Walton High School was approved at a ticket price of about $40 million.

The date for the rebuild has not been set. However, over the summer the school board approved hiring an architect to begin the design process for the new school.

Sharon Camp, who has taught science at Walton for the last 10 years, decided to involve her 83 AP Environmental Science students in pitching sustainable ideas to the school’s architect, Robert Sussenbach of Chapman Griffin Lanier Sussenbach Architects Inc. of Atlanta.

She has encouraged students to come up with environmentally friendly methods involving air quality, water pollution, energy saving methods, recycling programs and ways to incorporate vegetative waste in the lunchroom.

“The purpose of this project is to give the students the opportunity to apply the information they learn in class to real-world problem solving,” Camps said. “The project gives the students a context whereby the content information is more relevant to them, but most importantly, it gives them a chance to see how they can apply knowledge to solve problems.”

A few examples of what students developed:

 Saving on energy costs by installing windows in every class to allow for natural light

 Saving on water costs by setting up rain barrels around campus for school water usage

 Preserve air quality by planting trees in the school parking lots and building a greenhouse

For the rebuilding, Camps said students are also taking into consideration the budget, land restraints and cost benefit analyses.

“It also gives them practice working together in a group environment,” she said. “Most of all, it gives them an opportunity to impact our environment in a positive way, so that they feel more empowered to make a difference in their community.”

On Oct. 30, students will make their final recommendations to the architect, who Camp said has been very receptive to the idea.

It will consist of a verbal presentation to the architect, school principal and others; a three-dimensional mockup of their final structural design; and an informative brochure.

“It is very exciting to see the students so engaged and enthusiastic,” she also said. “When I told them that the architect was excited about hearing their ideas, they became even more motivated. As we get closer to the deadline, I see the energy level increase dramatically.

“My students have always been capable of accomplishing amazing things, and I am so grateful that I can give them a platform that they can use to show everyone what they can achieve.”

Madison Link, a 10th-grader in Camp’s class, was part of the publicity group, which is responsible for letting the Walton community know what they are trying to do in their class and for the school’s future.

“It’s been amazing to be a part of this project and part of building our new school,” Link said, adding that even though she won’t be a student when the new school is complete, she’s excited about what it will offer for future Walton Raiders.



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Samuel Adams
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September 19, 2013
I suggest we let the AP students from Walton run our school district, completely. Divide Hinojosa's salary among them to pay for their college and allow them to do a cost/benefit analysis of bureaucratic elements at Glover Street.

We have absolutely NOTHING to lose and everything to gain by doing this. And afterwards, let's set them lose on the people at the DOT who planted thousands of dollars of trees in Cobb medians and two years later cut them all down.
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