Senate hopeful: Politics shouldn’t be a career path
by Rachel Gray
December 09, 2013 12:14 AM | 3267 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
David Perdue addresses members of the Cobb County Republican Party at their monthly Saturday breakfast. Perdue supplied a long list of business credentials for why he should fill retiring U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss’ seat.<br>Special to the MDJ/John Delves
David Perdue addresses members of the Cobb County Republican Party at their monthly Saturday breakfast. Perdue supplied a long list of business credentials for why he should fill retiring U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss’ seat.
Special to the MDJ/John Delves
slideshow
State Rep. Ed Lindsey (R-Buckhead) promised Cobb Republicans during Saturday’s monthly breakfast he would lead the party and the nation in the right direction if elected to the 11th Congressional District seat.<br>Special to the MDJ/John Delves
State Rep. Ed Lindsey (R-Buckhead) promised Cobb Republicans during Saturday’s monthly breakfast he would lead the party and the nation in the right direction if elected to the 11th Congressional District seat.
Special to the MDJ/John Delves
slideshow
MARIETTA — A Georgia businessman asked for support from Cobb’s GOP on Saturday, touting his private sector experience and CEO credentials, while framing his lack of time in politics as a benefit.

David Perdue told the Cobb County Republican Party, during their monthly Saturday breakfast at headquarters off Roswell Road, that he has helped to grow some of America’s most recognizable companies, such as Sara Lee, Reebok and Dollar General.

Now, Perdue wants to use his real-world experience to become a U.S. senator, as he hopes to take over retiring Sen. Saxby Chambliss’ seat.

“I never wanted to do this. I never thought about doing this,” said Perdue, who is an industrial engineering graduate from Georgia Tech.

But, Perdue told the crowd of Republicans they cannot keep electing the same representatives and expect different results.

Unlike his opponents, who Perdue said have run for political office a combined 41 times, he has spent 41 years in the business world.

Perdue’s foray into politics should not be viewed as a change in career path, considering Perdue said one of his priorities will be to install term limits for the U.S. Congress.

“I don’t think our Founding Fathers ever envisioned a career politician,” Perdue said.

Bad for business

Perdue said his other big focus will be fighting to balance the budget in order to address the nation’s “full-blown financial crisis,” which he said will be “politically difficult, but not complicated.”

On Saturday morning, Perdue told his fellow Republicans the “bloated” federal government has been expanding by unprecedented numbers, mostly due to “accommodators” that are in appropriations positions. He added that the biggest appropriations group is The House Committee on Appropriations, which has a Republican majority.

Perdue said Congress makes rules that dictate how the economy operates, yet do not understand the ramifications of those regulations on businesses.

“They have no idea what you and me are dealing with out here,” Perdue said.

Perdue said the No. 1 threat to the United States is not Iran or China, but the federal debt.

Small-town banks are not lending the way they should and large financial institutions are not investing, because “the number one product out of Washington is uncertainty,” Perdue said.

A ‘reformer’

Another U.S. Congressional candidate delivered some criticism of the Republican Party during Saturday’s Cobb GOP breakfast.

After being introduced by his wife of nearly 25 years, Elizabeth, State Rep. Ed Lindsey (R-Buckhead) promised he would lead Republicans and the nation in the right direction if elected to the 11th Congressional District seat, soon to be vacated by U.S. Rep. Phil Gingrey (R-Marietta).

Like Perdue, Lindsey began his speech by listing his past employment history, starting with days working on his grandfather’s farm, followed by factory and road construction jobs in high school.

Lindsey told that crowd that now he is responsible for 80 employees at his McGuffey Lindsey & Johnson law firm, which defends individuals, small businesses, corporations, churches and private schools in law suits.

First elected in 2004 to the Georgia House of Representatives, Lindsey said he is known as a conservative reformer, working to change the tax code, enforce a stricter stance on illegal immigration and ensure families have access to charter schools.

Lindsey said the Republican belief in low taxes and a small efficient government is an ideal supported by the majority of Americans.

It is a fundamental difference from Democrats, who think “from cradle to grave, you can’t get by without the government,” Lindsey said.

Yet, Lindsey said, “We are a national party in crisis ... (Americans) agree with what we believe in, but they don’t think we know what we are doing.”

Cobb Republicans

The speeches at Saturday’s breakfast were in front of a packed house, with standing room only.

Cobb GOP Chairman Joe Dendy, who won re-election as the chair in March against Ron Paul supporter Oleg Ivutin of Smyrna, said the local group has 500 members.

Dendy added that Cobb has the largest number of Republican voters of all other counties in Georgia, and fifth in all counties in the United States. The amount is not based on percentage of residents, but by the size of the voting bloc, Dendy said.

Perdue said the great turn out at 8 a.m. on a Saturday tells him Cobb residents are “committed to making change and care about America.”

During his speech, Perdue, who was born in Macon and is the cousin of former Gov. Sonny Perdue, received as many laughs from well-timed jokes as rounds of applause for campaign promises.

Perdue said Cobb residents are very practical and want control of their lives. Not to be regulated by the federal government, he added.

“I want (the government) out of my pocketbook, off my phone and out of my house,” Perdue said.

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