Rodeo breeds cowboy competition: Event supports Sheriff’s Mounted Patrol Unit
by Rachel Miller
June 13, 2013 12:08 AM | 1811 views | 0 0 comments | 26 26 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Dick Cory of Rich Springs, S.C., entertains the audience with trick roping during the commencement of the 2008 Cobb Classic Rodeo at Jim R. Miller Park.
Dick Cory of Rich Springs, S.C., entertains the audience with trick roping during the commencement of the 2008 Cobb Classic Rodeo at Jim R. Miller Park.
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For two hours on both Friday and Saturday nights, cowboys will be competing in events at the Cobb County Equestrian Center at Jim Miller Park.

The 16th anniversary of the Cobb Classic Rodeo will begin at 8 p.m. each night at the fairgrounds located on Callaway Road, between Powder Springs and Austell roads.

This weekend’s competition is the International Professional Rodeo Association Southeast Region Finals, which includes bull riding, team roping and barrel racing.

The horse ring will have events in bareback riding, where riders try to hang on for eight seconds, steer wrestling, where the rider drops from the horse and wrestles the steer to the ground, and calf roping, where the rider must lasso the calf and tie three of its legs together.

Admission to the event, which offers food vendors, a petting zoo and mechanical bull, is $15 for adults and $12 for children.

The rodeo is sponsored by the Cobb County Sheriff’s Department, and some of the proceeds will go to the Cobb Sheriff’s Mounted Patrol Unit.

The mounted unit has six members from various divisions, with a couple of deputies that are reserve officers with full-time civilian jobs, said Sgt. Jeffery Rice.

“We get relieved from our posts and go mount-up,” Rice said.

Rice said the officers provide their own privately-owned horses that complete 80 hours of training with exposure to loud sounds and sirens.

Rice said the unit provides security in a unique way by moving people for crowd control and in searches for lost or wanted people.

Rice, who has been training horses since he was 14, said the adrenaline rush is what got him to ride in rodeos during the 1980s.

“I pay for it in my old age. Back then I bounced a lot more than I do now,” Rice said.

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