Report says poverty rate stuck at record level
by Hope Yen, Associated Press
September 13, 2012 12:16 AM | 526 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Claudia Pedroza, 39, and her 8-year-old daughter, Karla Osorio, wait at the Jefferson Action Center in Lakewood, Colo., on July 16 to apply for help with food, toiletries and seek a new frying pan. According to a Census Bureau report, roughly 46.2 million people remained below the poverty line last year, unchanged from 2010. That figure was the highest in the more than half a century that records have been kept.
Claudia Pedroza, 39, and her 8-year-old daughter, Karla Osorio, wait at the Jefferson Action Center in Lakewood, Colo., on July 16 to apply for help with food, toiletries and seek a new frying pan. According to a Census Bureau report, roughly 46.2 million people remained below the poverty line last year, unchanged from 2010. That figure was the highest in the more than half a century that records have been kept.
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The nation’s poverty rate remained stuck at a record level last year, while household income dropped and the number of people who don’t have health insurance declined.

A Census Bureau report released Wednesday provided a mixed picture of the economic well-being of U.S. households for 2011 as the nation enters the final phase of a presidential election campaign in which the economy is the No. 1 issue.

The overall poverty rate stood at 15 percent, statistically unchanged from the 15.1 percent rate in the previous year. Experts had expected a rise in the poverty rate for the fourth straight year, but unemployment benefits and modest job gains helped stave that off, the bureau reported. For last year, the official poverty line was an annual income of $23,021 for a family of four.

While unemployment eased slightly from 2010 to 2011, the gap between rich and poor increased. The median, or midpoint, household income was $50,054, 1.5 percent lower than 2010 and a second straight annual decline.

Broken down by state, New Mexico had the highest share of poor people, at 22.2 percent, according to rough calculations by the Census Bureau. It was followed by Louisiana, the District of Columbia, South Carolina, Arkansas and Georgia. On the other end of the scale, New Hampshire had the lowest, at 7.6 percent.

In a blog post, the White House said the latest figures show that government policies can help the poor, middle class and uninsured, while more work remains to be done.
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