Premiums unveiled for health overhaul
by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press
September 25, 2013 12:21 AM | 552 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
WASHINGTON — With new health insurance markets launching next week, the Obama administration is unveiling premiums and plan choices for 36 states where the federal government is taking the lead to cover uninsured residents.

Before tax credits that work like an upfront discount for most consumers, sticker-price premiums for a mid-range benchmark plan will average $328 a month nationally for an individual, comparable to payments for a new car.

The overview of premiums and plan choices, released Wednesday by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, comes as the White House swings into full campaign mode to promote the benefits of the Affordable Care Act to a skeptical public. Congressional Republicans, meanwhile, refuse to abandon their quest to derail “Obamacare” and flirt with a government shutdown to force the issue.

Sebelius stressed the positive in a preview call with reporters. Consumers will be able to choose from an average of 53 plan options when the new markets open Oct. 1 for people who don’t have health care on the job.

“For millions of Americans, these new options will finally make health insurance work within their budgets,” she said.

A report by her department estimated that about 95 percent of consumers will have two or more insurers to choose from. And the administration says premiums will generally be lower than what congressional budget experts estimated when the legislation was being debated. About one-fourth of the insurers participating are new to the individual coverage market, a sign that could be good for competition.

But averages can be misleading. When it comes to the new health care law, individuals can get dramatically different results based on their particular circumstances.

Where you live, the plan you pick, family size, age, tax credits based on your income and even tobacco use will all impact the bottom line. All those variables could make the system hard to navigate.

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